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Full text of "Reports of the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 1898-1911"

No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



or THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital foe Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 

FOR THE 

Five Months ending September 30, 1898. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1899. 



JAN 81 1921 

State house, bo*T©N 



JB 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital foe Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 



WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, 
ALBERT C. GETCHELL, M.D., Secretary 
BURNHAM R. BENNER, M.D 
ADELAIDE A. CALKINS, . 
CHARLES A. CLOUGH, . 
WILLIAM S. HYDE, . 
MABEL W. STEDMAN, . 



BOTON. 

w okcester. 

Lowell. 

Springfield. 

Boston. 

Ware. 

Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



OWEN COPP, M.D., . 
EDGAR J. SPRATLING, M.D., 
LILLIAN M. KINCAID, 
CHARLES F. SIMONDS, . 
GEORGE E. BATES, . 
J. W. WILLIAMS,. 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Clerk. 

Steward and Storekeeper. 

Engineer. 

Farmer. 



TREASURER. 

CHARLES B. FISKE, 

Office at the Hospital. 



Palmer. 



Commonfocaltb of ffltosadrasetts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics was created by the 
Legislature of 1895 (chapter 483, Acts of 1895) for the pur- 
pose of taking care of adult epileptics. It received certain 
State lands and property in the township of Monson, close to 
the railroad station of Palmer on the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road, and a certain sum of money wherewith it was required to 
make provision for the care and treatment of 200 epileptics. 

A report in regard to the use of said money, and describing 
the buildings built and the other work done by the direction of 
the trustees previous to the opening of the hospital, will be 
made separately. 

The Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics was opened on the 
second day of May, 1898, by proclamation of His Excellency 
Governor Wolcott, in accordance with the eighth section of 
chapter 483, Acts of 1895. It was under the charge of Dr. 
Owen Copp, the superintendent, who had been appointed in Sep- 
tember, 1895, and who had had the supervision and direction of 
the building and other work on the property since that time. 

Dr. Edgar J. Spratling was appointed assistant physician in 
March, 1898, in order to be on hand to receive the patients, 
and for such other work as might be required. Mr. Charles 
B. Fiske of Palmer was appointed treasurer, and assumed his 
duties on the 1st of April, 1898. 

Since the opening of the hospital we have received 206 
patients, and we now have 200, the full number that we are 
required to provide for, and the demand for admission is very 
great. We have already been obliged to refuse many worthy 



6 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



persons because we had no room or suitable accommodation to 
receive them. The trustees have, moreover, decided that, for 
the present at least, they can receive no patients whatever from 
outside the State, — there being much too little room for the 
Massachusetts epileptics. 

As this institution is obliged to receive epileptics, both sane 
and insane, male and female, gentle and excited, it is obvious 
that an essential condition of good management is their proper 
classification. This cannot be well accomplished with our pres- 
ent accommodations ; and the trustees therefore recommend the 
erection of a building which shall serve at the same time as 
a place for the reception of new patients until they can be 
properly classified and also where provisions can be made for 
any persons needing special medical and surgical treatment. 
We have at present no accommodation for such persons except 
in the ordinary wards and the general buildings ; consequently, 
any cne sick person is liable to disturb a whole ward at night and 
keep all the patients awake. This, which might be overlooked 
in the case of perfectly well persons, is a serious matter for the 
class for whom we care, as in this way fits may be induced or 
aggravated. Our separate rooms are too few to accommodate 
the sick, and are needed for other purposes. 

It is evident to any person who has had the slightest experi- 
ence with any number of epileptics, that there is the greatest 
difference in the mental condition of such persons. Some are 
said to be of unusual mental endowment and intellect. Many 
are of average capacity and mental development, — essentially 
as healthy people except that they are subject to an occasional 
fit, — while others are mentally enfeebled, this enfeeblement 
being of all degrees, from the slightest possible trace scarcely 
to be detected by the expert to the lowest degrees of dementia, 
where the patient is bedridden, unable to speak or to feed him- 
self, and has to be cared for in every way as a child. In many 
of the demented cases the enfeebled mind, incapable of a full 
and clear understanding of its surroundings and incapable of 
self-control, is extremely excitable and irritable, so that these 
persons have to be watched continually, lest in an outburst of 
violence or temper they injure themselves or others. 

It is obvious that it is impossible that perfectly sane persons, 
healthy except for an occasional fit, should be placed in con- 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



7 



tact with the insane or partially insane already described. 
While we can now make a partial division or classification by 
dividing the patients into different wards, it is necessary that 
we should before long have a building separate from the others 
and possibly at some distance from them, for the reception of 
such sane female epileptics as are essentially healthy except for 
an occasional attack, and are able in most respects to lead a 
natural, normal life. The trustees therefore advise that a 
building be erected for the care and reception of sane female 
epileptics as soon as the Legislature grants the money re- 
quired. 

The trustees desire to call special attention to the treatment 
of epileptics. This consists largely in occupation of a proper 
kind. All sane epileptics and many of those partially de- 
mented or otherwise mentally afflicted are much better both 
physically and mentally when obliged to do some regular work. 
This work often is not of any great money value, but it may be 
considered as a form of treatment necessary for the best mental 
development and health of the patient. Certain epileptics, 
again, can work as well as healthy persons, barring the attacks ; 
but of this class the hospital contains few examples. Since, 
therefore, a primary consideration in the treatment of epilep- 
tics is systematized occupation, and since not all of the men 
and few or none of the women are capable of the rough out-of- 
door work which is best for a certain class, it is very important 
to have workshops where this work can be properly performed. 
These we have to a certain extent provided, but we shall 
probably need more room in the near future. 

The trustees desire to express their satisfaction with the work 
of the superintendent, which has been especially difficult and 
arduous on account of the many problems arising in the build- 
ing and arrangement of such an institution as the State Hospital 
for Epileptics. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, 

For the Trustees. 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Tmstees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

It becomes my duty to present to you the report of the 
superintendent, with that of the treasurer, for the period of 
five months beginning May 2, 1898, and closing with the 
hospital year, September 30. 

By proclamation of Governor Wolcott, the hospital was de- 
clared open for the reception of patients on the former date. 

Although the work previously accomplished will be made 
the subject of a special report by your Board, yet a brief state- 
ment here will add to the clearness of what I am about to say. 

By act of the Legislature of 1895, " all the lands, buildings, 
and personal property " then belonging to the State Primary 
School were assigned to the use of this hospital, and, in addi- 
tion, the sum of $160,000 was appropriated for the construction 
of such new buildings, and for making such repairs, alterations 
and additions to old ones, as should be deemed sufficient to 
accommodate 200 epileptics and the necessary officers and 
employees. 

Thus was acquired a beautiful site, shaded by an old growth 
of elms and maples, on a hillside overlooking one of the most 
picturesque valleys of the Commonwealth. The farm of two 
hundred and thirty acres can be made very productive. 

Most of the old buildings, being unfit for hospital purposes, 
were sold, torn down and removed. The brick power and 
laundry buildings were preserved and renovated for the central 
heating, electric lighting and power plants, machine shop, 
laundry, bakery, store and sewing rooms. An extra story 
was added to the old carpenter and paint shop, thus furnishing 
a large industrial room for male patients in addition to its 
original accommodations. 

The long, one-story wooden hospital building was remodelled 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



into quarters for subordinate officers and general employees. 
The other small hospital at the top of the hill will immediately 
be enlarged and converted into a cottage for twelve epileptic 
men. 

On the west slope, at right angles to the line of the above 
and about five hundred feet away, a group of three new build- 
ings has been constructed of red brick with granite trimmings. 
In the centre stands the administration building, separated by 
a distance of one hundred feet from a hospital cottage on either 
side. It is about fifty by sixty feet and three stories in height. 
The first floor is occupied by offices, waiting room, library, 
dispensary and small laboratory, while the two upper stories 
provide living apartments for the medical staff and other 
officers. 

The hospital cottages are equal in size and identical in form, 
one being designed for women and the other for men. Their 
general shape is a rectangle, fifty by one hundred and twenty- 
five feet with an ell thirty by thirty feet projecting from the 
north side at either end. In the south-east and south-west 
corners of each story are day rooms, between which on the 
south are two large dormitories, and on the north two dining 
rooms separated by a serving room common to both. In each 
ell at the rear of the day room are four bedrooms, in addition 
to bath, toilet and clothes rooms. The incline of the ground 
to the north affords an extra story on that side, which is used 
for the kitchen. Each cottage is divided into four independent 
sections, each accommodating twenty-five patients. 

The sewerage and water systems are especially complete 
and comprehensive. The former converges to a central screen 
chamber, where all obstructive materials are removed ; thence 
empties into a flushing tank of five thousand gallons capacity, 
which at this limit siphons into the main sewer. The latter is 
laid around the crest of the hill just north of the hospital, and 
discharges through laterals at intervals of about one hundred 
feet upon a considerable area of light soil. The rapid outflow 
of so large a quantity of liquid affords wide and even distribu- 
tion, while the arrangement of laterals controlled by valves 
allows its use when and where it is most needed. During a 
portion of the year, as in winter when the ground is frozen, it 
may not be advisable to thus dispose of it. To provide for 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



such contingency, a series of eight filter beds of course gravel 
has been prepared at the terminus of the system at the foot of 
the hill. 

Water is obtained from two independent sources, the old 
local and the new Monson supply. The former consists mainly 
of surface water, which flows from the hills west of the institu- 
tion into a large open reservoir, and to a limited extent of 
ground water from several springs near by. The surface water 
is contaminated by sewage from several barns and houses on 
the hillside above and was condemned for drinking purposes 
by the State Board of Health. It can, however, be used in the 
laundry and boilers and for irrigating the lawns. Aside from 
this objection, it would be insufficient in quantity during the 
summer months, and so full of organic matter, developed in 
the open storage reservoir, that it could not be used. It 
became necessary, therefore, to seek a supplementary supply, 
which should be adequate and satisfactory under all circum- 
stances and also provide good fire protection. These require- 
ments were met by connecting with the Monson water works. 
A terminal reservoir, constructed of solid masonry and covered 
b}' a concrete roof, was built on the high ground south-west of 
the hospital. Into this the Monson water flows by gravity 
through a six-inch cast-iron pipe, and accumulates to one hun- 
dred and seventy-eight thousand gallons. An eight-inch cast- 
iron pipe conveys it to and around the hospital buildings. 
The hydrants, set at each corner of the latter, will furnish at 
any time eight two and one-half inch fire streams under press- 
ure of ninety pounds. The town has contracted to supply 
for twenty-five years six million gallons of water per annum, 
at rates which average about eight cents per thousand gallons, 
and any quantity beyond such limit at five cents per thousand. 
Our present requirements are about eight million gallons for 
the year. 

The first patient was admitted May 16. Altogether, 101 
men, 105 women, total 206, were received ; 4 men and 1 woman 
were discharged ; 1 man died ; leaving at the end of the year 
96 men, 104 women ; total 200. The daily average number of 
patients was 130.83. 

Of the admissions, 83 men, 81 women, total 164, were trans- 
ferred from other institutions, as shown in statistical Table No. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



4; 15 were committed directly by the courts, 5 as insane epilep- 
tics, 10 as epileptic only; 17 were received on the approval of 
a judge, and 10 as private voluntary patients. 

Of the discharges, 1 was much improved, 1 improved, 3 not 
improved. Two men eloped and were not returned. The 
others went to their friends. 

The daily average number of State patients was 45.87, town 
patients 78.27, private patients 6.69. The average rate of 
board paid by private patients was $4'. 21 per week. The 
weekly cost of maintenance per patient was $4.62. About $1 
per week should be added to this in allowance for supplies on 
hand May 2, and consumed prior to October 1. This ap- 
parently high cost will be reduced as the number of patients 
increase, as their labor, which is now inferior in quality, im- 
proves by teaching and development, and as a smaller propor- 
tion of helpless cases is received, more than thirty-five per cent, 
being now helpless, crippled or feeble. 

In the matter of treatment, we aim to put each patient in the 
best physical condition, believing this to be the first step in 
reaching the essential etiological factors in epilepsy, and that 
many auxiliary causes may thus be removed. Naturally, nutri- 
tion first engaged attention, as being vital to the general tis- 
sues and especially to the proper performance of function by 
the nerve cells. There is usually found serious disability in 
the digestive apparatus. The teeth have been lost by neglect 
or are badly decayed ; the stomach disordered by catarrhal 
inflammation and the bowels constipated. This means local 
irritation, septic absorption, indigestion and malnutrition. 

From one hundred and forty mouths examined five hundred 
and forty-one carious teeth have been extracted, numerous 
alveolar abscesses cleaned out and three necrosed jaws treated. 
So many teeth had been previously lost that an average of only 
14.86 to each patient remains. Thus mastication has become 
practically impossible in the majority of cases. The results 
of such investigation present important indications for treat- 
ment, as proper care of remaining teeth, their repair by neces- 
sary dental work, and the preparation of food in such form as 
not to require mastication. 

In the further study of nutrition, a close relation was ob- 
served between the diet and the daily percentage of fits. This 



12 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct, 



pertains to kind, preparation and combination of different 
articles of food. "Without going into greater detail, it suffices 
to say that we intend to study all the physical needs and dis- 
abilities of the epileptic, and to endeavor to supply and correct 
them so far as possible. 

Too much stress cannot be laid upon the value of systematic 
occupation, both mental and physical. The danger of self- 
injury by falling, his irritability and tendency to impulsive 
violence, and the alarm excited by the exhibition of his distress- 
ing malady have usually debarred him from employment, and, 
if early afflicted, have closed against him every avenue of 
acquiring knowledge and skill necessary to fit him for useful- 
ness. Therefore he has become habituated to idleness, isola- 
tion and practices naturally bred under such conditions. These 
must not be allowed to continue, else greater degeneration is 
inevitable, apart from the effects of his disease. The task re- 
quires infinite tact, patience and persistence. It involves risk 
of injury to patient, to teacher and to property. This can be 
minimized in an institution, but not eliminated by any system 
of care. It must be taken for the good of the epileptic, if we 
would avoid such restrictions upon his liberty as would render 
life intolerable, and defeat the end of every effort in his behalf. 
Before reaching the hospital, he has usually lost the inclination 
to do consecutive work, has become deficient in power of atten- 
tion and application, fickle and untrustworthy. What else 
could be expected from the life which he has been compelled 
to lead? He needs, above all else, development, direction 
and control. 

Ten per cent, of our patients are young and teachable. This 
percentage is likely to increase, and would now be much larger 
if the insane were excluded. A school of thirty pupils has just 
been organized to teach these in elementary subjects, and pre- 
pare them for manual training. A large work room for men 
and boys is nearly ready, in which it is proposed to teach shoe- 
making, tailoring, printing, carpentry and such other work as 
patients may be able to do. 

Twenty-four of the more demented men have been employed 
in grading and road building, 13 on the farm, 2 in the laundry, 
6 in and about the kitchens, 1 each in the store and bakery, 1 
doing clerical work in the office and 2 as messenger and bell 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 13 



boys, making 53 per cent, working outside of the wards ; 15 
have assisted on the latter. Thirty-four per cent, are helpless, 
crippled or feeble. 

Of the women, 5 have done general housework at the cottage, 
4 at the administration building ; 2 have worked in the kitchens, 
14 in the laundry and 15 in the sewing room, making a total of 
38 per cent, doing other than ward work ; 17 have helped in the 
latter. Thirty-six per cent, are helpless, crippled or feeble. 

Effort will be made to employ every patient, so far as possi- 
ble, for his own improvement and development. In many cases 
the outgo, at the start, will be greater than the return ; but 
ultimately the improved condition, and consequently greater 
ease in caring for such, together with the better quality of work 
done, will be of distinct advantage to the institution and lessen 
the cost of maintenance. 

The special treatment of epilepsy is largely experimental, 
owing to the lack of accurate data upon which to base it. The 
importance of securing such can hardly be over-estimated, when 
it is considered that probably more than 4,000 epileptics are 
to-day living in Massachusetts, and about 700 are already in- 
mates of charitable institutions, while many others are rapidly 
approaching the almshouse or insane asylum by reason of this 
disease. It would seem to be not only humane, but economical, 
to make every effort for its cure and amelioration and to equip 
this institution to do first-class scientific work in this direction. 

As before stated, 35 per cent, of our patients are helpless, 
crippled or feeble, and require separation from other classes, 
and given infirmary care. 

New admissions should be placed under close observation for 
the first few weeks or months, until the peculiarities of their 
epilepsy can be studied, their habits and propensities learned, 
careful examinations and records made, and the general condi- 
tions under which they ought to live determined. For these 
purposes a hospital building is urgently needed. It should 
provide for 100 patients, with equal accommodation for each 
sex, and should have a strictly hospital organization and equip- 
ment. Here should be gathered all the important medical 
work. 

Thirty sane inmates of the hospital are now unavoidably 
brought into more or less intimate association with the insane. 



14 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



This is to be deplored. Sufficient space should separate the two 
to make them independent. The cottage, now in process of 
remodelling, will effect this for the men. A similar provision 
for the women should be made as soon as possible. 

The piggery, slaughter house and hennery are too small and 
much out of repair, and should be replaced by new buildings. 

The coal shed should be doubled in size to store a year's 
supply of coal and to enable us to buy on the most favorable 
terms. 

The interior walls of the hospital are already becoming soiled, 
and need painting. 

It will be necessary to provide for furnishing the cottage for 
men. This was not included in the appropriation for furnishing 
and equipping the original buildings. 

During the year it would be desirable to establish several 
new industries for patients and to replace old and add new 
machinery in the carpenter and machine shops. 

I would earnestly recommend that careful estimates of the 
cost of the above be made, in order that the next Legislature 
may be petitioned for the means to supply them. 

There is now some confusion as to the age of eligibility for 
admission of patients. The law (Acts of 1895, chapter 483, 
section 8) reads "... and thereafter the trustees may receive 
into said hospital for care and treatment any adult person, not 
a criminal, who is subject to epilepsy, provided such person be 
neither an idiot, an inebriate, or violently insane." The word 
" adult" is variously interpreted by different judges, some de- 
clining to commit any epileptic under twenty-one. 

In as much as about 75 per cent, of cases of epilepsy develop 
before the age of twenty, and early treatment affords the great- 
est hope of recovery, and especially since there is no provision 
for epileptics between fourteen and twenty-one, it is desirable 
to fix the age of admission definitely at fourteen and over. 

Dr. Edgar J. Spratling, formerly second assistant physician 
at the Matteawan State Hospital, Xew York, was appointed 
assistant physician and entered upon his duties March 1. His 
zeal and enthusiasm have been very helpful. Mr. Charles B. 
Fiske, cashier of the Palmer National Bank, was made treas- 
urer, beginning his service April 1. His long experience in 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 15 



financial matters has been of the greatest value in opening our 
accounts. 

The farm has been carried on for the last two seasons, but 
previously had been almost entirely neglected for several years. 
Only necessary work has been attempted, since prior to the 
opening of the hospital all labor was hired. It has been 
well stocked and fairly equipped, and will yield a good return 
in the future. A report of its products for the past year is 
appended. 

We wish to acknowledge gifts of medical books and periodi- 
cals from the Boston Medical Library and the Worcester Medi- 
cal Library Association, through the kindness of Dr. William 
N. Bullard and Dr. Albert C. Getchell, and the contribution 
of medical pamphlets by Mrs. Adelaide A. Calkins. 

The Eastern Hampden Agricultural Association very kindly 
furnished passes which enabled many of our patients to attend 
their annual fair. Such acts afford great pleasure to those who 
would otherwise be deprived of such enjoyments. 

To my associates, officers, nurses and employees I desire to 
express my hearty appreciation of their cordial co-operation 
under many discouragements. To their interest, kindness and 
fidelity the usefulness of an institution must be largely attrib- 
uted. 

The unfailing support and counsel of your Board have been 
strength and guidance to me under all circumstances, for which 
I am profoundly grateful. 

OWEN COPP, 

Superintendent. 



16 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

I respectfully submit herewith the following report of the 
finances of this institution for the five months it has been open, 
ending Sept. 30, 1898 : — 

Assets. 

Real estate, $23,013 00 

New buildings, 84,000 00 

Old buildings, 31,550 00 

Water and sewerage systems, .... 30,200 00 

$168,763 00 

Personal estate : — 

Live stock on the farm, $3,998 50 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 3,731 42 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 2,255 50 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . 18,363 20 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 3,568 74 

Other furniture in inmates 1 department, . . 4,620 32 
Personal property of State in administration 

building and employees 1 cottage, . . . 5,675 35 

Ready-made clothing, 874 25 

Dry goods, 424 08 

Provisions and groceries, 888 83 

Drugs and medicines, 500 00 

Fuel, 2,500 00 

Library, 500 00 

Other supplies undistributed, .... 5,241 84 

$53,142 03 

Receipts. 

Received from State appropriation for present 

year, $10,128 93 

Received from State appropriation for 1897, . 1,170 94 

Received from State appropriation 1895 for 

building, 4,576 41 

Received from State appropriation for furnish- 
ing and equipping, 3,379 45 

Total from appropriations, . . . $19,255 73 

Amount carried forward, $19,255 73 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



Amount brought forward, $19,255 73 

Received from State for board of patients, . $482 42 

from towns for board of patients, . 1,134 31 

from individuals for board of patients, 425 04 

from sales, 549 62 

from patients for safe keeping, . 378 10 

2,969 49 

Total receipts, $22,225 22 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, wages and labor, $5,943 72 

Provisions and supplies : — 

Meat, $690 43 

Fish 65 86 

Fruit and vegetables, 147 61 

Grain and meal, 15 21 

Tea, coffee and chocolate, .... 116 69 

Sugar and molasses, 234 64 

Milk, butter and cheese, .... 349 68 

Salt and other groceries, .... 117 02 

All other provisions, 259 02 

Grain and meal for stock, .... 160 11 

2,156 27 

Clothing, 331 66 

Fuel and lights, 1,206 44 

Medical supplies, 37 80 

Furniture, beds and bedding, 38 56 

Transportation, 108 07 

Ordinary repairs, 59 52 

Expenses of superintendent and trustees, .... 116 00 

Paid account of patients, 132 03 

All other current expenses, . . . . . . . 1,143 98 

Repairs and other extraordinar}' expenses, .... 9,126 80 



Total expenditures, $20,400 85 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1898, 1,824 37 



$22,225 22 



Statement of Appropriations. 



APPROPRIATION". 


Amount. 


Expended 

before 
May 2, 1898. 


Expended 

since 
May 2, 1898. 


Balance 
unexpended. 


Appropriation, 1895, for buildings, . 
Furnishing and equipping, . 
Current expense, 1897, 
Current expense, 1898, 


$160,000 00 
22,750 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 


$143,630 68 
17,130 55 
20,473 35 
4,562 15 


$4,576 41 
3,379 45 
1,170 94 

10,128 93 


$11,792 91 
2,240 00 
3,355 71 
10,308 92 


$232,750 00 


$185,796 73 $19,255 73 


$27,697 54 



18 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. '98. 



Resources. 

Cash on hand, 

Due from Commonwealth for board, 

from cities and towns for board, 

from individuals for board, 
Unexpended appropriations available, 



Salaries and wages due, 
Miscellaneous bills due, 
Patients' money, 



Liabilities. 

$1,566 33 
. 431 82 
. 260 77 



$1,824 37 
2,685 74 
4,530 52 
18 50 

24,341 83 

$33,400 96 



2,258 92 



Balance, 



$31,142 04 



Taking the total expenditures, 

And deducting the extraordinary expenses, 

Also amount paid account of patients, 



$9,126 80 
132 03 



$20,400 85 



9,258 83 



We have the current expenses, ...... 

Adding to this the unpaid salaries and bills due, . 

And dividing the sum by the average number of patients 

(130.83), we have the average cost per patient, . 
Equivalent to an average weekly cost of .... 



$11,142 02 
1,998 15 

100 43 
4 62 



Examined and approved : 



CHAS. B. FISKE . 

Treasurer. 

WILLIAM S. HYDE, 
CHAS. A. CLOUGH, 

Auditing Committee for the Trustees. 



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.1 .-• .«„-„-| Is • 

iaS^^Sif«sS.|| tfg sas3l 

2 o o — " ~ " " ~ 2 " E S o 5. 



22 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



65 
CO 

« 

CO 



CM 



- < 

z ■- 

M O 



o 




CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


co 




CM 


CM 


to 




OS 


CO 


* 




1— 1 




CO 


Ci 




1—1 


T-l 


r— 1 


1-1 




t>. 






co 




iO 


o 


CO 


co 












CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


d 




uO 


t> 


as 


o 













CO 


o 


CS 


CT5 




CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


8 


CO 




CO 










t> 


OS 


OJ 





Totals. 


1 1 1 l-H 1 




i-H I 


Deaths. 


Females. 


1 1 1 1 1 


1 I »?| • i 




| Males. 


1 1 1 1-1 1 


1-1 


1-1 1 




Totals. 


1 TH 


CM 1 


CM 


»o 


»o 1 


Discharges 


Females. 


1 rH I | | 


i-H 


1—1 1 




"3 

3 


1 1 


CM I 


CM 




^ 1 



CO CO I 

o o 

CM CM 



O C5 ^ co >o »o I 

CO CO CM o o 



c 

a, o <x> 

cm «H £ 

» ^ r2 h 

: * . 1 I eS I § 
| 1 £ I * 

4 b <1 02 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 23 

3. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Case; admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 


101 


105 


206 


Total of cases, 


101 


105 


2vo 


Total of persons, .... 


101 


105 


206 


4. — Relations to Hospitals of Cases admitted. 


HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males- 


Females. 


Totals. 


Inmates of this hospital only, 


IS 




42 


Former inmates of other hospitals : — 








WAfifliAfmi rrVi Tncin^ H Ainit-il 


10 


in 




Worcester Lunatic Hospital, . 


i 7 


-1 t 

14 


6 i 


Worcester Insane Asylum, 


4: 


7 


11 


Northampton Lunatic Hospital, 


9 


11 


20 


Massachusetts School for Feeble- 
minded, 


6 




6 


State Almshouse, .... 


17 


16 


33 


Hospital Cottages for Children, 


1 


2 


3 


Danvers Lunatic Hospital, 


7 


11 


13 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital, 


9 


9 


18 


Westborough Insane Hospital and 
Hospital Cottages for Children, . 


1 




1 


Worcester Lunatic Hospital and 
Hospital Cottages for Children, . 


2 




2 


Boston Insane Hospital, . 




1 


1 


Total of cases, 


101 


105 


206 


Total of persons, .... 


101 


105 


206 



24 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



5. — Nativity and Parentage of Persons admitted. 



T>T A/TI?0 /~\T? VATTT71TV 

rLACJiiS <JJ) JsAIlVlix. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patient. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Patient. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Patient. 


Father. 


u 

6 

£ 

£ 


Massachusetts, 


53 


8 


9 


56 


13 


7 


109 


21 


16 


Other States : — 




















Connecticut, 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


1 


Maine, 


2 


1 


2 


3 


- 


2 


5 


1 


4 


Missouri, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


New Hampshire, 


1 


1 


- 


4 


- 


- 


5 


1 


- 


New Jersey, 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


New York, , 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


5 


4 


2 


Pennsylvania, . 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Rhode Island, . 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Vermont, . 


7 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


8 


1 - 


1 


Other countries : — 




















Canada, 


4 


1 


1 


4 


3 


4 


8 


4 


5 


England, . 


3 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1 


7 


2 


2 


Ireland, 


6 


5 


5 


10 


2 


2 


16 


7 


7 


France, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Germany, . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


2 


Italy, . 


1 






1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Poland, 








1 






1 






Portugal, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Russia, 


1 






1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Scotland, . 


1 


1 


1 


1 






2 


1 


1 


Switzerland, 






1 












1 


Unknown, . 


13 


78 


76 


12 


80 


82 


25 


158 


158 


Totals, . 


101 


101 


101 


105 


105 


105 


206 


206 


206 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



25 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 



COUNTIES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total9. 


Barnstable, 










Berkshire, . 





t> 



1 
1 


7 


Bristol, 




/? 



a 



12 


Dukes, 










Essex, 




Q 

O 


lo 


O 1 

21 


Franklin, . 






1 
1 


■i 


Hampden, . 




4 


10 


14 


Hampshire, 




1 


3 


4 


Middlesex, 




26 


24 


50 


Nantucket, 










Norfolk, . 




8 


5 


13 


Plymouth, . 




3 


4 


7 


Suffolk, . 




21 


26 


47 


Worcester, . 




15 


12 


27 


Totals, 




101 


105 


206 



26 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 







CD 


CO 


CO 




•8IBJOX 










CM 


CM 


CM 


no 




iO 


•O 


»o 


< 




o 


o 


o 


H 
O 






















rH 


1— ( 


1—1 






o 


o 


o 




»-H 


l— 1 


1—1 






cm 


CM 


CM 


























t> 




t>. 













M 




















P 
























IO 




iO 




•S31BK 












"1* 










rH 






G 










H 










o 










p 




































CO 


CO 
















o 


o 


o 






CO 


CO 


CO 






QO 


CO 


GO 






rH 






§ 


































CM 


CM 


CM 






rH 


1-H 


rH 








^> 










»o 


*o 









































i 




CI 


Ol 


Ci 


PS 

■< 




CO 


CO 


CO 


M 










z 










p 
















'" H 






•89IBK 


CO 


CO 


CO 










co 




n 
















O 




tr. © 
X « 




V 
co 


m 
f-i 




O 5C 




S3 


<x> 








a 


Ph 




PS - 

w a 




e*H 


«H 








o 


O 








13 


"o3 




g 




© 


o 






<4-> 


H 


H 
















Fir 







1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 52. 

8. — Occupation of Persons admitted. 



21 



MALES. 



Barber, 


1 


Painters, .... 


2 


Book agent, 


1 


Peddler, .... 


1 


Bookkeeper, 


1 


Physician, 


1 


Butcher, . 


1 


Sailor, .... 


1 


Carpenter, 


1 


Salesman, 


1 


Clerks, 


o 


Shoemakers, 


o 


Druggist, . 


1 


Spinner, .... 


1 


Farmers, . 




Student, .... 


1 


Janitor, . 


1 


Tanner, .... 


. ' 1 


Jeweller, ... 


1 


Teamster, 


1 


Laborers, . 


. 15 


Tinner, .... 


I 


Lather, 


1 


Weavers, .... 


2 


Marble worker, 


1 


Unknown, 


4 


Mechanics, 


4 






No occupation, 


. U 


Total, 


. 101 


FEMALES. 


Domestics, 


. 12 


Daughter or wife of — 




Errand girl, 


1 


Architect, .... 




Hairdresser, 


1 


Domestic, .... 




Housewives, 


. 15 


Engineer, 




Laundress, 


1 


Fireman, .... 




Librarian, 


1 


Gardener, 




No occupation, 


. 47 


Laborer, .... 




Stitcher, . 


1 


Liveryman, 




Student, . 


1 


Merchant, 




Vestmaker, 


1 


Sailor, .... 




Waitress, . 


1 


Shoemaker, 




Weaver, . 


3 


Teamster, 




Unknown, 


8 


Totals, 


. 105 



28 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



9. — Probable Causes of Disease in Persons admitted. 







ISSAXE. 






Base. 




Totals 

OTALS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Catarrh of stomach, 


9 


9 


A 
t 


1 

x 


1 
x 


9 


D 


V_11lULJ1L LIJL' I 111?, t • 


1 


3 


4. 


2 




9 




Cong6Dital d6f6cts, • 


7 


1 1 
1 1 


1ft 
xo 








1 ft 


/"^ T-» /-\ 1 r, *-»rj lnfon t" 1 1 1*11 


Q 
o 


9 


K 
O 


1 

X 




1 

X 


D 


v^noicd, • ■ • • 










I 


1 

X 


1 


Diphtherial. • • • 










1 
x 


1 

X 


1 


XjUCcpiltlllLla, i • . 


1 




I 








1 
1 


JO* a UU5U1 Cj • • • 

Family trouble, 


1 




1 








I 






I 




I 


1 

X 


9 


T-T ore Hifr 

l-Ivflroopnhal us 


I 


3 


4 








A 
-± 


1 

* 


1 


2 








2 


iii Qcaiiu, • • • 


9 

it 


Q 


A 




9 • 
— 


9 


7 
1 


TrirlinroctiriTi 

XUUlgcSl-t-MJ, • • • 








2 




9 

_a 


9 


innerucu bj uuiiia, . • 










1 

A 


X 


1 


Tnfnntilp polio 

xiiiautiiv uuiiVj^ « • 








1 




1 




JDiaDlllc pd.1 <Xlj sis, 


4 


K 
«J 


q 








q 
9 


Tninrr tr\ _ipf__i 

XXlJltl > IAJ XlCttU, • • 


5 


2 


7 






1 
X 


a 




j.iii€iiipcrdiJLc, • • 

Tr_ f"__.ct _ riQ 1 r>'ltQ T*r* n 

JLli Lc.M Ilia i V_.IUII.1IJ. • • 


u 




A 

- u 











1 


9 










Q 
O 


1 p-iil nr.. «riniri cr 


2 




2 








2 


ALeningiiis, • • • 












1 


1 

X 


-UClIUIJaUic, . . • 














1 

X 


A I f\ ^tiirha Hon 

-UaolUL UtlLlvU , • • 


9 




9 


1 




1 


10 


onnntic 

._.> t.pnrii-5, • • • 




Q 


4 






1 

X 





it are»i9, • • • 


i 

X 




i 

X 








1 


Pn /in rn nn 5 1 

X 1 1 C Li ill . 'U . . 1 . ■ • • 










1 


1 


I 


UitlnUlh, • • • 


9 




9 








9 


Scarlet- fever, . . ■ 








1 

X 




1 

X 


1 

1 


Septicaemia, . 


1 


1 


2 




— 




2 


Sexual excess, 








1 




1 


1 


Softening of brain, 


1 


3 


4 








4 


Suppression of menses, . 




2 







2 


2 


4 


Sunstroke, 








1 




1 


1 


Spinal disease, 


1 




1 


1 




1 1 


2 


Syphilis, 


2 




2 


1 




1 


3 


Teething, 


1 




1 








1 


Tuberculosis, . 










1 


1 


1 


Unknown, 


29 


44 


73 


2 


3 


5 


78 


Totals, . 


85 


89 


174 


16 


16 


32 : 


206 



30 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



iii ^ — ■ i i i ■ i i i i 



i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 



I I I I TH | | | | | | | | H t- 

CM 



I I I H I I I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I tH I I I I I I I I I 



co <o 
o 

CM 



o ^ 



|(N?CCOO(Nt>NHl> | | H 



(MQOiOCNCiN'ONNH I ^ — • ' — • 
H(D(NH lO 



CO CO 

O *o 

CM 

CM 



IB 9) X Jj IB H ^* 31 Bl G 

t«a>a>cua>a>a>aia>a> £ 

•^oiooiooooooaT* ^ «p 

— CMCMCOCO^iOtOt^COSj tfH fcD 

hOooooooooo" . ° ■ 

„ ci ^ *a — *a +- — *- *J — g 

g ^-HCMCMSOCOr^OCO^g g O « 

bC » G fc, G t~< 1*3 

625 55 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



31 



(Ml I I I -*OCO-f >OM 
rH ^ (M -t CO O 



CD CO CO 

o o ^ 

CM CN 



tH I | | | CO CO iO (N CO (N 



i-H I I I I CO SO OS »C H 



I I I I I | CO CO CO 30 rH 



cn en x 

~ ~ ~ oo ao w oT 



o o 



:3 s3 is S3 

a> a> cj i> 

•S ~ c - ^^^^ 

_ O *h — (M S3 

|7|^coo^h(moo^ I 
be 3 a r "' ^ c 

CD ^ 
> S3 
C^3 



32 



HOSPITAL 



FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Totals. 




CO CO 




"S9f T?U19jJ 


1 tH 




*S8IUJ\[ 


CO <M 




Died. 






l-H H 


*S91BUI9 1 J 


1 1 


1 1 


•B8IBH 




i-H i-H 


Not Epileptic. 




| | 


| | 


*89[BJ\[ 


I I 


1 I 




1 1 


Not Improved. 




i— i CM 


CO CO 


*S91BCQ9jJ 




tH i-i 


*S9[T?J\[ 


T— 1 1—1 


CM CM 


Improved. 






i— < i— 1 


"fc'9[t3tH9 jj 


I | 


1 1 






i—l rH 


Much Improved. 


•8l«lOX 


1 rH 


»—l i— 1 


*89[t3lH9jJ 


1 1 


1 1 


*69lt?J\[ 


1 tH 




Recovered. 


•8IBJ0X 


| | 


| | 




1 1 


1 1 


•89[BH 


1 1 


1 1 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


A. — Insane epileptics : — 
First, 

B. — Sane epileptics : — 
First, 

Total of cases, 
Total of persons, 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — 



No. 62. 



33 




34 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



i 



© 

•<s> 

to 

I 



5» 



Eh 

sa 

OH 
« 2 



is 

o 



i-l OS 



I I 



M ^ 



•S3IBK 



I I 



rH OS 



aT »T «T „ 

' "5 "5 "S W eo to g 
.2. § H ^ O 

^ o b 2 > a 



CP 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 35 



FARM PRODUCTS 

In 1898. 



Milk, 79,213 quarts, $3,163 52 

Eggs, 501 \ dozen 198 75 

Hay, 113£ tons 1,656 00 

Hay, meadow, 12 tons, '. 72 00 

Ensilage, 54 tons, 108 00 

Green fodder, 7 tons, U 00 

Oat fodder, 2 tons, 16 00 

Asparagus, 132 pounds, 13 20 

Radishes, 3 bunches, 30 

Rhubarb, 1,719 pounds, 61 76 

Lettuce, 3,575 heads, 35 75 

Strawberries, 13 boxes, 1 30 

Turnips, 434 bushels, 217 00 

Green peas, 55 £ bushels, 55 50 

Carrots, 250 bushels, 125 00 

Currants, 5f bushels, 14 00 

Cucumbers, 1,799, 35 98 

Cucumbers, 11 bushels, for pickles, 16 50 

Table beets, 416| bushels, 250 00 

Garden beans, 261 bushels, 26 '25 

Sweet corn, 9,477 ears, 94 75 

Tomatoes, 75 bushels, 37 50 

Onions, 50 bushels, 30 00 

Cabbage, 9 barrels, 9 00 

Pumpkins, 377, 18 85 

Pears, 10^ bushels, 15 37 



Amount carried foncard, , $6,191 2$ 



36 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

Amount brought forward, $6,191 28 

Mangolds, 200 bushels, . . . . . . . . 80 00 

Field corn, 180 bushels, 72 00 

Seed sweet corn, 3 bushels, 1 50 

Squashes, 898, 78 10 

Apples, 200 barrels, 400 00 

Quince, 1£ bushels, 1 50 

Potatoes, 1,350 bushels 675 00 

Beans, 3£ bushels, 4 87 

Cider apples, 50 bushels, 7 50 

Calves, 18 256 50 

Pigs, sold, 16, 81 25 

Shoats, 72, 258 00 

Pork, 2,515 pounds, 125 75 

Veal, 520 pounds, 52 10 

Calf skins, 3, 5 00 

Chicken, 18 pounds, 2 70 

Chicken, 56 pounds, 33 60 

Cow hides, 14 58 



$8,441 23 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 37 



AKTICLES MADE IN THE SEWING- ROOM 
AND ON THE WARDS. 



Sheets, .... 


174 


Wrappers, . 


19 


Pillow cases, 


426 


Dresses, 


75 


Table cloths, 


47 


Aprons, 


184 


Napkins, 


120 


Skirts, .... 


108 


Curtains, 


223 


Night dresses, 


124 


Bureau covers, 


56 


Chemises, 


155 


Commode covers, . 


7 


Drawers, 


184 


Towels, 


. 1,731 


Coats, .... 


1 


Dish towels, . 


179 


Bibs, .... 


52 


Clothes bags, 


54 


Suspenders, pairs, 


59 


Clothes-pin bags, . 


3 


Shirts, .... 


57 


Rugs, .... 


10 


Overalls, pairs, . 


2 


Dusters, 


17 


Trousers, pairs, . 


3 


Box linings and covers, 


7 


Vests, .... 


1 


Hammock, . 


1 


Night shirts, . 


17 


Flags, .... 


7 


Rubber caps, 


12 


Oven cloths, . 


8 


Bathing dresses, . 


5 


Holders, 


21 


Pillow ticks, . 


299 



38 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. '98. 



LIST OF PEKSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, '. $2,500 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 1,250 00 

Treasurer, per year, 300 00 

Clerk, per year, 400 00 

Steward and storekeeper, per month, 45 00 

Supervisor (man), per month, 35 00 

Supervisor (woman), per month, 30 00 

Night attendants (men, 2), per month, .... f 23 00-27 00 

Attendants (men, 7), per month, 20 00-25 00 

Night attendants (women, 2), per month, 18 00 

Attendants (women, 8), per month, 14 00-19 00 

Engineer, per year, 800 00 

Assistant engineer, per month, 45 00 

Fireman, per month, 26 00 

Watchman, per month, 30 00 

Baker, per month, 30 00 

Cooks (4), per month, 18 00-22 00 

Assistant cooks (2), per month, 16 00 

Table girls (2), per month, 16 00 

Seamstress, per month, 23 00 

Assistant seamstress, per month, 16 00 

Laundress, per month, 25 00 

Laundryman, per month, 25 00 

Assistant laundresses (2), per month, 16 00 

Farmer, per year 600 00 

Assistant farmers (7), per month, 20 00-26 00 

Handy man, per month, 33 00 

Gardener, per month, 30 00 

Expressman, per month, 28 00 



iPUBLIC DOCUMENT 

\ 



No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

or THIS 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 

FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1899. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 
18 Post Office Square. 
1900. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

or THE 

MASSACHUSETTS ) x Wc^ 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 
FOR THE 

Yeak ending September 30, 1899. 



^ BOSTON: 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1900. 



JAN 31 



3 



OFFICERS 



Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, . . . Boston. 
ALBERT C. GETCHELL, M.D., Secretary, . . . Worcester. 

BURNHAM R. BENNER, M.D., Lowell. 

ADELAIDE A. CALKINS, Springfield. 

CHARLES A. CLOUGH Boston. 

HENRY M. PHILLIPS, Springfield. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., . 
ARTHUR O. MORTON, M.D., . 
MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., 
LILLIAN M. KINCAID, . 
MARGARET M. McCAUGHAN, 
CHARLES F. SIMONDS, . 
GEORGE E. BATES, . 
J. W. WILLLAMS, 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician and 

Pharmacist. 
Clerk. 

Stenographer. 

Steivard and Storekeeper. 

Engineer. 

Farmer. 



TREASURER. 

CHARLES B. FISKE, 

Office at the Hospital. 



Palmer. 



Commottfocaltjj of liassatjwsrits. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To Bis Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics 
present, herewith, their report for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1899. 

This has been the first year during the whole of which the 
hospital has been in active operation ; much, therefore, has 
been necessary in the way of preparation and arrangement of 
detail, as must be the case in any new institution. Moreover, 
this work has been considerably delayed and hindered by the 
untimely resignation of our superintendent. In spite of this, 
the year has been one of marked progress, and the condition 
of the institution seems to us satisfactory, on the whole. 

It is with the deepest regret that the Board recalls its loss 
in the death of one of its members, the Hon. William S. Hyde 
of Ware. He had been a member of the Board almost from its 
creation, and had been associated with all its important work. 
He was a man of broad interests, and of such sound judgment 
in matters of business that the Board was able to place the most 
complete reliance on his opinion. He was always most atten- 
tive to his duties in relation to the hospital, and gave freely 
and ungrudgingly of his time whenever the interests of the 
institution demanded it. 

The following testimonial to his memory was adopted by the 
Board at the meeting in July : — 

Since the last meeting of the Board we have learned with sorrow 
of the death of our friend and associate, William S. Hyde. Some of 
us knew of his illness, but his death was a painful shock to all. Per- 



6 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



sonally, we feel we have lost a friend, and collectively, a valued coun- 
sellor and co-worker. We desire to give expression to our feeling at 
this loss, and our estimate of him as a man. 

Mr. Hyde was held by his fellow trustees in the highest regard for his 
excellent ability as a counsellor, his sound accomplishments and help- 
ful experience in affairs of business. He was ever ready to respond 
to all the obligations of his position, and took a thoughtful and un- 
selfish interest in the working of the hospital. He was of a kindly, 
charitable disposition, and his genial nature inspired a warm attach- 
ment, which, now that he is parted from us, has left a pleasant and 
tender memory. 

We shall miss his friendly presence, and the respectful affection 
which we felt for him quickens our sympathy for his bereaved family. 

It is the vote of the Board that this tribute to the memory of Mr. 
Hyde be written in the records and a copy sent to his family. 

The vacancy in the Board, caused by the death of Mr. Hyde, 
was filled in June by the appointment of Col. Henry M. Phillips 
of Springfield as trustee. 

In April the superintendent, Dr. Owen Copp, presented his 
resignation, in order to accept the position of executive officer 
of the State Board of Insanity. He was the first appointee of 
the institution, had been connected with it from the earliest 
stages, and under his care, supervision and direction it had 
been built, established and brought essentially to its present 
condition. His loss was consequently a very serious one, and 
temporarily crippled and delayed the progress of our work. 
Dr. Copp was a most excellent officer, a man of unusual execu- 
tive ability and administrative skill, and held, personally, the 
most pleasant relations with the Board. As his successor was 
appointed Dr. Everett Flood, who was then superintendent of 
the hospital cottages for children at Baldwinville. He assumed 
the position of superintendent in the latter part of June, on 
the retirement of Dr. Copp. 

In June the assistant physician, Dr. Edgar J. Spratling, 
resigned, as did also the interne, Dr. Leo Tobias. An acting 
assistant physician, Dr. Edmund R. P. Fourtin, assisted the 
new superintendent temporarily. At the present time we have 
two acting internes, Dr. Arthur O. Morton and Dr. Morgan 
B. Hodskins, who are satisfactorily accomplishing the work 
under the direct supervision of the superintendent. 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



: 



During the year the main work of the institution has been 
the care and treatment of the patients, of which the number 
has always taxed and at times exceeded the accommodations 
provided. Much has been done by them in grading the grounds 
about the buildings and improving their general appearance. 

Owing to the change in superintendents, and for other rea- 
sons, it has not been found advisable to hasten in the construc- 
tion of the new buildings, for which money was appropriated 
by the last Legislature. The high price of building materials 
at the present time has furnished one reason for not pressing 
work. Plans for these buildings are now being matured, and 
it is possible that some foundations may be laid this autumn. 

A small wooden cottage, which was on the place at the time 
when the property was transferred to the trustees of this 
institution, has been remodelled and is now nearly ready for 
occupation. It will furnish accommodation for 20 male pa- 
tients, who do not need constant supervision. In memory of 
Mr. Hyde it has been named the Hyde cottage. 

Workshops have been arranged and furnished, and several 
patients now find in them pleasant and profitable occupation in 
woodworking, shoemaking, tailoring, printing and cane-seating. 
The carpenters shop has been provided with suitable machinery. 

Information of much value and interest is gradually being 
collected in relation to the best methods of care, occupation 
and treatment of the class of persons who are admitted to this 
institution, and we hope later to be able to make practical use 
of this for the public benefit. 

Many needs are pressing upon the institution, but under the 
present conditions, when such high prices prevail, we only 
press our request for the following three appropriations ; the 
special need of which is more fully explained in the superin- 
tendent's report : — 

Current expense appropriation, $15,000 

Boiler house and boilers appropriation, .... 25,000 
Stone quarry appropriation, 450 

WILLIAM X. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, 
ALBERT C. GETCHELL, M.D., Secretary, 

For the Board of Trustees. 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

It devolves upon me to make a report of some of the events 
of the last year, not only covering the short time of my own 
residence here, but the nine months of Dr. Copp's superintend- 
ency. This I shall of necessity do somewhat crudely, but I 
hope to bring forward all the essential points, so far as their 
presentation rests with me. 

I offer the following tabulation of admissions, discharges, 
etc. : — 



Number of patients Sept. 30, 1898, ....... 200 

Since admitted : — 

Sane, . 78 

Insane, . . . . 24 

Discharged and on visit : — . 

Sane. — Much improved, 3 

Improved, 16 

Not improved, 6 

Died 1 

On visit, 3 

29 

Insane. — Much improved, 2 

Improved, 5 

Not improved, 31 

Died, 16 

Not epileptic, 1 

On visit, 2 

57 

Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1899, 216 

Daily average of patients, 206.43 

Per capita cost (per week), $4 50 



One transfer of patients has been made from this institution 
to the Worcester Asylum, and conditions are rapidly returning 
when another would seem to be imperative. With the opening 
of Hyde cottage this date will be deferred more or less, but 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— -No. 62. 



9 



admissions are so frequent that occasional transfers will be 
necessary until new buildings are completed. 

An enumeration of some of the work completed or under- 
taken is as follows : — 

Grading has been carried on very successfully, though a 
large amount still remains to be done. 

The completion of Hyde cottage and naming it in memory of 
the late Mr. Hyde are matters of much moment. 

The construction of an industrial room, by adding an extra 
story to the carpenter's shop, furnishes a most useful place for 
the occupation of twelve or more patients. 

The purchase of machinery for the carpenter's shop, provided 
for by an appropriation of last winter, has been completed. 

The laboratory work, now well begun, is going on satisfac- 
torily. The plan for records has been still further carried out, 
and combines the case book and envelopes. 

A small greenhouse for starting early vegetables has been 
constructed. 

The great quantity of farm produce indicates the possibilities 
in this direction. Over 2,500 quarts of canned goods and pre- 
serves have been put up by the several kitchens, and these are 
now all in stock, ready for the winter's use. The following 
partial list will give an idea of the farm's productiveness : — 



Farm Products. 



87,096 quarts milk. 
2,073£ pounds rhubarb. 
5,059 pounds winter squash. 
1,200 bushels potatoes. 
3,458 pounds pork. 
507 quarts strawberries. 



151f bushels tomatoes. 
150 barrels apples. 
327 bushels onions. 
99f pounds asparagus. 
400 bushels turnips. 
139| pounds chickens. 



The year's test of the sewage and water system has proved 
them both to be of remarkable efficiency. We should cer- 
tainly feel that great wisdom and foresight have been exhibited 
in the construction of these fundamentals. 

Since the last report the uncertainty as to the age of patients 
has been removed by an act of the Legislature, and the law 
now prescribes that persons of fourteen years of age or over 
may be admitted. 

Special attention is being given to the dietary in the lines 
already marked out, and good results are observed. 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 

Patients Working. 



[Oct. 



Males. 



Femaies. 



Grading, . 

Industrial building: — 

Chair-seating, . 

Printing, . 

Tailoring, cutting, 

Tailoring, sewing, 

Cobbling, . 

Wood carving, . 

Jobbing, . 
Kitchens, . 
Farm, 
Laundry, . 
With yard man, 
Stone, 
Painting, . 
On roads, . 
Stable, 
Barn, 

Sewing room, . 
Ward work, 

Administration building, 
Laboratory, 
Clerical, . 
Spinning, . 
Weaving, . 

Totals, 



15 

1 

2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
6 

14 

2 

12 
2 
2 
1 

3 

10 

1 

1 



79 



7 
17 



15 

20 
4 



1 
1 

67 



Some oew industries have been established for patients. At 
times a larger group of women is employed in the kitchen for 
an hour or two when there is a large amount of vegetables to 
prepare. Several men work entirely without supervision. 

"While this large number of persons is induced to go to their 
work very regularly, the product of such labor is not in pro- 
portion to the number engaged. Nearly all these workers go 
out to their various places about 8 or 8.30 and return as early 
as 11.30. Some are able to work only half days at a time. 
Those who attend school, on rainy days do not generally do 
any work except their school work. For many such reasons 
the actual returns to us are less than would be indicated by the 
large number employed ; but the result to the patient is what 
we mainly seek, and this is encouraging. 

The plan for the management of Hyde cottage is to model, 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



as far as the conditions are the same, after one of the Bielefeld 
cottages. Patients are to be trusted, and attendance dispensed 
with, as far as possible. They will live under suitable restric- 
tions, just as every law-abiding citizen must, but will be given 
every privilege that their mental state will allow. 

An effort has been made to learn the number of epileptic 
persons in Hampden County. The assistance of the practicing 
physicians in the various communities has been freely afforded 
us, and we hope, also, by personal inquiry to obtain accurate 
facts as to the proportion of persons manifesting these symp- 
toms. Later on a detailed account of special cases, now in the 
community and iu hospitals, will be tabulated, and some useful 
results are expected. 

Gifts to the hospital have been by the following donors : — 

Books : Dr. B. B. Benner, Mrs. Mary Xewcomb, Mrs. Samuel 
Overend, Mr. Sidney George Fisher, Mr. C. A. LeGro, Mrs. George 
Ezekiel. 

Magazines, etc. : Miss Loomis. Missionary Committee Y. P. S. C. 
E. Second Congregational Church, Palmer, Mrs. W. H. Hitchcock, 
Dr. Bryant, Mr. George Ezekiel, Mr. C. A. LeGro, Mrs. Geo. Eze- 
kiel. 

Worsted : Mrs. Mabel W. Stedman. 
Cloth and plants : Mrs. Samuel Overend. 

All building material has advanced in price, but we believe 
that by making extra effort with our own labor and with the 
advantage that owning a stone quarry will bring, we shall be 
able to abide by the conditions of our appropriations. The 
present proposition is to go on with the plans and adapt and 
perfect them, do the excavating, build foundations, and then 
let contracts for buildings. Our expectation is to be able to 
provide the buildings specified by the last Legislature for the 
sum appropriated. We have no disposition to ask a further 
grant for this purpose. 

An appropriation of $20,000 was granted by the last Legis- 
lature for current expense ; of this, only $15,000 will probably 
be expended up to the first of October, and it looks as if we 
may not need to use all of the last $5,000 ; so that, in making 
an estimate of current expense appropriation for next year, we 
must take this into consideration. 



12 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



The stone quarry on the hill, in the rear of our buildings, is 
for sale, and we should secure it, as the building material is 
convenient and suitable and will be very useful. 

The present boiler plant is not adequate to the work, as three 
of the boilers are old and must be renewed. We can use them 
to good advantage for a year or two, but need immediately to 
be able to connect on a new and large boiler to insure good 
results for all weather, and to give us reserve in case of a boiler 
needing repairs. We certainly should take every forethought 
possible to insure our getting a new boiler house under way 
next season, and to provide means for at least one new boiler. 

My view of the appropriations required for the coming year, 
based upon careful personal study of the situation and corrob- 
orated by a competent engineer, is as follows : — 

Estimate for boiler room (two boilers), .... $25,000 

Estimate for current expense, 15,000 

Stone quarry, 450 



EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

I respectfully submit herewith the following report of the 
finances of this institution for the year ending Sept. 30, 1899 ; 

Assets. 

Real estate, $23,013 00 

New buildings, 84,000 00 

Old buildings, 37,470 24 

Water and sewerage systems, .... 30,200 00 

$174,683 24 

Personal estate : — 

Live stock on the farm, $4,870 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 4,804 50 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 2,749 15 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 20,650 78 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 3,446 91 

Other furniture in inmates' department, . . 4,647 89 
Personal property of State in administration 

building and employees' cottage, . . . 6,642 35 

Ready-made clothing, 817 44 

Dry goods, 823 60 

Provisions and groceries, 1,770 87 

Drugs and medicines, 1,140 80 

Fuel 3,332 00 

Library, 575 00 

Other supplies undistributed, .... . 5,324 05 

$61,595 34 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1898, .... $1,824 37 

Received from State appropriation for present 

year, $12,983 27 

Received from State appropriation for 1898, . 10,308 82 

Received from State appropriation 1895 for 

building, 5,872 67 

Received from State appropriation for furnish- 
ing and equipping, 2,230 00 



Amounts carried forward, .... $31,394 76 



$1,824 37 



14 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Amounts brought forward, . . . $31,394 76 $1,824 37 

Received from State appropriation 1899 for 

improvement, inside painting, ... 6 86 

Received from State appropriation 1899 for 

equipping workroom, 54 44 



Total from appropriations, 31,456 06 

Received from State for board of patients, . $10,894 05 
Received from towns for board of patients, . 20,825 25 
Received from individuals for board of pa- 
tients, . . 2,042 21 

Received from farm and farm produce, . . 820 08 

Received from patients for safe keeping, . 294 48 

Received from all other sources, . . . 211 59 

. 35,087 66 

Total receipts, $68,368 09 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, wages and labor, ....... $22,162 94 

Provisions and supplies : — 

Meat, $2,777 22 

Fish , 393 54 

Fruit and vegetables, . . . . 399 68 

Flour 1,789 93 

Grain and meal for table, .... 240 90 

Grain and meal for stock, .... 1,755 30 
Tea, coffee and chocolate, .... 218 28 

Sugar and molasses, 911 49 

Milk, butter and cheese, .... 1,804 69 
Salt and other groceries, .... 558 59 

All other provisions, 1,009 05 

11,858 67 

Clothing, 1,525 62 

Fuel and lights, 3,563 69 

Medicine and medical supplies, 787 71 

Furniture, beds and bedding, 593 71 

Transportation, 610 68 

Ordinary repairs, 1,776 69 

Expenses of superintendent and trustees, .... 385 60 

All other current expenses, 5,186 21 



Total current expenditures, $48,451 52 

Paid to patients, 349 72 

Paid on account of patients, 21 80 

Repairs and other extraordinary expenditures, . . . 8,163 97 



Total expenditures, $56,987 01 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1899, 11,381 08 



$68,368 09 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 15 



Statement of Appropriations. 



A DDD ADDT A ^TTA NT 

Ar rKUr KI A 1 ION . 


Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
this Year. 


Balance 
available. 


A fiTirnnrifltinn ISQ^ "frit* hnil/Hnoa 


<t 1 An 000 00 


4148 207 OQ 


*t 879 ft7 


*«; Q90 94 


Furnishing and equipping, .... 


22,750 00 


20,510 00 


2,230 00 






9t 000 00 


14. RQ1 OS 


10 308 89 




Current expense 1899 


°0 000 00 




12,983 27 


7 016 73 


Appropriation 1899, for furnishing cottage, 


1,100 00 


- 




1,100 00 


1899, for inside painting, 


500 00 




6 86 


493 14 


1899, for machinery, . 


750 00 






750 00 


1899, for equipping work- 
room. 

1899, for infirmary huilding, 


500 00 
75,000 00 




54 44 


445 56 
75,000 00 


1899, for cottage, . 


10,000 00 






10,000 00 




$315,600 00 


$183,408 J 7 


$31,456 06 


$100,725 67 



Resources. 

Cash on hand, $11,381 08 

Bills receivable for board, .... 9,371 43 

Unexpended appropriations available, . . 100,725 67 



$121,478 18 

Liabilities. 
Salaries unpaid, .... $1,950 19 
Miscellaneous bills, .... 649 95 
Money due patients, . . . 205 53 

2,805 67 



Balance, $118,672 51 

Taking the total current expenditures, $48,451 52 

And dividing this by the average number of patients (206.43), 

we have the average annual cost per patient, . . . 234 71 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of ... 4 50 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 

We have examined the foregoing statement, and believe it to be correct. 

CHAS. A. CLOUGH, 
BURNHAM R. BENNER, 

Auditing Committee for the Trustees. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



C(N JJO I^Hh-NCCCtCOO i— | KCNO 

oc:oao cn cc -h HXNr-o o — x> co cn 

NiHOC 04 iH CO i-l . . . . 

•-o l-? — en 

C 52 M 
cn — 



I cn t>- <o "t cs 

o r: so 



tC c: r>- 



«0 I N 'O CO M 



I 

Jo 
1 



C M N -< I HNW I I O I I I CO CN | I I I I 







«C O X 


CN CT5 | i— CN CN I 


i i en 


O 1 1 1 1 1 




• 


H-*«H 


■<* 








* 












s 












a? 


-iCN 


1 CN O — <C CN CO 1 


1 1 *0 


1 1 1 1 1 




5 


CN OS tC 


QQ — y~. 


cs 


CN 




o 






















a 


m 

: 


C5 TT DC CN 


1 | 03« I OHH | 


1 1 CO 


| I I I 1 


< 




CO C5 CN 




C5 
















3 




























(NCNO 


1 <M(NC5nC-N 1 


1 1 CN 


O 1 1 1 1 1 






X CM C OQ 


i-i iH CO 


O 


CN 



























o 23 



o 







. . = • - . 




rf 


Si 




X 

• i—i 






CO 
43 


s s 
§ i 






X — 



> . T3 - 

o a> o 
> — 



x 



,2 
a 

o 



s 

"9 * 



2 1 2 5 5 5 J -/ = 7. 



— > s 



> c c • S s 



II 



0» fe 



PL, P > 



20 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



verage of patients 
the Hospital. 


Totals. 


199.80 
198.43 
201.71 


NOOWWNOOHM 
OOCNO^WOVHCON 

0> CO 00 CM CM """t* sO i - ^ 1 
O-Hi-H—tOOOO — 

(NCN(N(NCNCN(NtNCN 


1 


1 


206.43 


Females. 


101.45 
100.50 
97.97 


O CO CO © O CO 
O 00 IN CN N r-i O O 

CO CM CM CO CO C7> CM CO 
0500000QOO 

i— 1 t— 1 i— 1 l— 1 i— 1 1—1 


1 


1 


100.66 


<» 


m 


iO CO 
CO OS t>. 


COC35h.»iONOCON 
HCONHiQiiOON 


1 


1 


t>- 


< 

a 


Mai 


00 CO 
05 050 


Cx5d»5CO^'(NiC^N 
O^i-ii-iOOOOO 






o 




Totals. 


CO CM 1 


i-l I 1 CM CO H H (N CM 




»—l 


1 


i 

< 

H 


Females. 


1-H 1—1 1 


i-l 1 1 HHH | | | 


CO 


CO 


1 




Males. 


CM i-( | 


1 I I i—l CM 1 l— t CM CM 


i—t 


l-H 


1 




Totals. 


T-l 


I CO CO CO GS QQ I>- 
CM 


co 


CO 


1 


00 

as 

© 
•< 


;males. 


<M »C ^ 


1 1 i-l CM t> CM CM 1 CM 


CM 


CM 


\ & 


t> 


'— 


























Males. 


CO CO 1 


1 1 CM TjH O | i-l CM *0 


CM 


CM 


1 



"OOWOO^COOCO 



- 1 •_ 

u 3 

o g § 

O O CP 



s- cs _r 



o 

s 



c 

tn O 05 

CJ to bfi 

co J- 1 1* 

« s 2 

O O 03 

-2 rs >> 



h-5 Cx< g «< S «-9 >-8 <! CO 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 

3. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



21 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 


65 


35 


100 


Second, 


1 


1 


2 


Total of cases, 


66 


36 


102 


Total of persons, . . . . 


65 


36 


101 



4. — Relations to Hospitals of Cases admitted. 



HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Inmates of this hospital only, 


49 


32 


81 


Former inmates of this hospital only, . 


1 


1 


2 


Former inmates of other hospitals : — 








Boston Insane Hospital, . 


1 




1 


Danvers Insane Hospital, 


1 




1 


Hospital Cottages for Children, 


4 


1 


5 


Northampton Insane Hospital, 


1 




1 


State Almshouse, .... 


2 


1 


3 


Taunton Insane Hospital, 


3 




3 


Worcester Insane Hospital and Hos- 
pital Cottages for Children. 
Worcester Insane Hospital, 


2 

2 




2 

2 


Worcester Insane Asylum, 




1 


1 


Total of cases, .... 


66 


36 


102 


Total of persons, 


65 


36 


101 



22 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



5. — Nativity and Parentage of Persons admitted. 



PLACES OF NATIVITY. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




Patient. 


C 

j> 

s 
Eb 


Mother. 


Patient. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Patient. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Massachusetts, . 


40 


11 


10 


22 


8 


2 


62 


18 


12 


Other States : — 




















Connecticut, . 


2 


2 


2 


4 


1 


1 


6 


3 


3 


Maine, . 


4 


4 


2 


1 


_ 


2 


5 


4 


4 


New Hampshire, . 


3 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


1 


3 


New York, . 


2 


1 


3 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


2 


3 


Rhode Island, 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


2 


_ 


Vermont, 


2 


2 


1 


_ 





_ 


2 


2 


1 


Wisconsin, . 


_ 


- 





2 


_ 




2 


_ 




Other countries : — 




















Australia, 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 





1 


_ 


_ 


Canada, 


2 


1 


1 


3 


4 


2 


5 


5 


3 


England, 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


5 


Germany, 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


2 


4 


4 


5 


Ireland, 


1 


10 


10 


1 


8 


12 


2 


18 


22 


Russia 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Scotland, 




1 


1 




1 






2 


1 


Wales, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Unknown, 


3 


25 


25 




9 


11 


3 


34 


36 


Totals, 


65 


65 


65 


36 


36 


36 


101 


101 


101 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



23 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 





"VI&16S • 








3 


5 


8 




4 


2 


6 




5 


3 


8 






1 


1 




7 


4 


11 




7 


4 


11 




2 


1 


3 




3 


1 


4 




26 


12 


38 




8 


3 


11 




65 


36 


101 



24 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



! 

4! 

ss 



g 

a 



Totals. 




O CM 

o 

1—1 


CM rH 

o o 

rH rH 




VO rH 

CO 


CO CO 
CO CO 




»0 rH 

co 


CO >o 
CO CO 


Unknown. 




CM 1 


CM CM 




1 1 


1 1 




CM 1 


CM CM 


Widowed. 




*o 1 






"<f 1 






rH | 




Marbibd. 




1 

rH 


rH rH 




»o 1 






04 1 




Unhabbibd. 




O CM 
CO 


CM rH 

co co 




CO rH 

CM 


!>• 

CM CM 


•891BPI 


CO rH 


^ CO 


NUMBER OF THE 
ADMISSION. 


First, 

Second, .... 

Total of cases, . 

Total of persons, 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 

8. — Occupation of Persons admitted. 



25 



MALES. 



Advertising agent, . 


1 


Printer, 


1 


Blacksmith, 


'V 1 


Salesmen, 


2 


Cabinet maker, 


1 


School teacher, 


1 


Cigar makers, . 


2 


Upholsterers, . 


2 


Clerks, .... 


2 


Weavers, . 


3 


Cook, .... 


1 


Tailor's cutter, . 


1 


Farmers, .... 


2 


No occupation, . 


. 33 


Janitor, .... 


1 


Unknown, 


4 


Laborers, .... 


7 






Peddler, .... 


1 


Total, 


. 65 



FEMALES. 



Domestics, 


5 


Florist, . 


1 


Dressmakers, . 


2 


Laborer, . 


6 


Housewives, 


8 


Machinist, 


1 


School girl, 


1 


Miner, 


1 


No occupation, . 


. 18 


Musician, . 


1 


Unknown, 


2 


Painter, . 


1 






Peddler, . 


2 


Daughter or wife of — 




School teacher, 


. . 1 


Baker, .... 


1 


Sea captain, 


1 


Blacksmith, 


1 






Carpenter, 


3 


Total, 


. 57 


Carriage maker, 


1 







26 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



9. — Probable Causes of Disease in Persons admitted. 





Insane. 


Sank. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Diphtheria, 


I 




1 








1 


Dog bite. 








1 




i 

1 


1 


Fevers, .... 




i 
1 


1 








1 


Gonorrhoea, . . 










1 


1 


1 


Heredity, . • ■ 










i 

1 


i 
1 


1 


Injury to head, 








2 


a 
Z 


A 

4 


4 


Intemperance, 


1 
1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


Measles, .... 








i 
1 




1 


1 


Menstruation, 










Q 
O 


6 


3 


Overwork, 










1 


1 
1 


1 


Self abuse, 


- 


- 


- 


2 




2 


2 


Sunstroke, 








1 




1 


1 


Tobacco, 








3 




3 


3 


Vaccination, . 








2 




2 


2 


Unknown, 


18 


3 


21 


32 


24 


56 


77 


Totals, . 


20 


4 


24 


45 


32 


77 


101 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



— Xo. 62. 



IN I CM SO QO — 

•s:**ox ' o — 



o "S3njnra j ! «0 I I «© I I ao 

H CO CM 



;?-vx i cn t> »o »-i t-i o« aa i x 



x. — r% 
"C — 



I i— It* 



tH | CO 



-3 

o 

I 



S 



— ^ — C Ch 

p i §, r 2 s > 

£ o o 



*3 Sjo 

_ - 

a o 

< P 



a 



28 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



e 



5- 
so 

o 

t 

CO 



I |H(NHH(N(NCONH(N 



| \ y-< \ | HH | I | H(N I tO tO 



I I I (NH | rH CN CO <M | | | 



CN^CNCN I I I rH CN rH rH rH rH t— l> i-H 

1-H 1-H tJH 



'"H i-H i-H | | I j | I HHH | tO t© 



i-H CO i-H CM | | I H(N I I I rH 



rH i-H O 





(Si 

M 


Totals. 


1 iD-HH*Ot^r-l»OCO-^*OCN | | 
CN i-H i-H i-H rH 


o 

i-H 


rH 

o 

i-H 


30.5 




EN ADMITT 


Females. 


1 Ht*t»00WH«O 1 CO rH | | 


to 

CO 


to 

CO 


31.9 


Persons admitted. 


t 


Males. 


1 »ONOOCJOS^O^CNH | | 
rH 


to 
to 


»o 
to 


29.1 


M 
V 


Totals. | 


OS HiOONCNWHN CO I 
HJ rl H 


1 OS 


CN 

o 

rH 


i-H 

o 

i-H 


16.62 




FIRST ATTA 


Females. 




1 


to 

CO 


to 

CO 


18.5 




Hi 


Males. 


OS r- -HH -HH rH CN I rH CM I 
CN i-H 


I *o 


to 
to 


*o 
to 


14.75 



********* if) 

tecccntBcoGQMGoaj c 

•r-O'COOOOOOO CO * O f^i o 

(N (N CO CO Tii iO CO t> CO ^ <4-| C4_( bO 

rJ*POOOOOOOOO© w ° ° * 

C^rHCNCMCOCOTt<»OtOt>g^ o o ^ 

IM si H H s 

6s£ <5& 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 




HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Totals. 




t>- cj co co 

lO CM 1 00 CO 


•8a[t?raaj 


CM H 
CM rH 


CO CO 

co co 


•83it?re 


»0 QO 
CO rH 


CO CO 


ft 

■ 
Q 


•sibjoj, 


CO tH 


rH rH 




CO 1 


CO CO 


•831BK 


O r- 1 


rH -rH 
rH rH 


Not Epileptic. 




rH I 


rH rH 




1 1 


1 1 


•89IBK 


rH | 


rH rH 


Not Improved. 


■«l»}ox 


i-l CO 

CO 


CO CO 


•S8IB039 j 


CM CM 

rH 


rH rH 


•S3IBK 


rH 


CO CO 
CM CM 


Improved. 


•SIBJOX 


rH 


co co 

CM <M 




^ CO 


CM CM 
rH rH 


•S3IBK 


CO " rH 
1— 1 


rH rH 


Much Improved. 


•81BJOX 


CM CO 


O *0 


•saiBinaj 


1 iH 


rH rH 


•891BK 


CM CM 




A 
H 
— 

O , 

3 


•BIBJOX 


1 1 


1 1 


•saiBraaj 


1 1 


1 1 


•saiBK 


1 1 


1 1 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


A. — Insane epileptics : — 
First, 

B. — Sane epileptics : — 
First, 

Total of cases, 
Total of persons, 



1899.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



1— I 1— < i— I i— I i— I i—l CO i—l i—l i—l CM HHH 



I I l-H 1-1 || I | H | tH I l-H 



I 1—1 1— I I I HCO l-H i—l I CM | 



I I I I I I I II I > ll I 



I I I I I II 1 II I III 



I I I I I II I II I I t-H | 



1—1 l-H l-H T-l 1-1 CO 1-1 1— ll— I 



CS l-H | rH 



I 



1— I | | i—l i—l 



tH I i— I 



I HH | | r-l CO i-l i-H I CM I I CM 



3 £ © 
o ^ — 
.5 © 



w k » c3 C 



"1 



>/3 



■•■§•3 

A © c3 

s c s 

+3 © ■— > 

o o 
£ - 



_ 



CO 

O 

ll 
s-s 



lis 



a 

i ° 

"© 



31e s3 d 



o 
H 



b£ 



a 

© © 



32 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



lg 
PS « 
M - 



O J 
- f-> 



O 

2 

« . 



•sib;ox 



■siBiox 



I HCONtDO I I I I I 



I I HHCOH | | | | | 



I rl(NHCO^ | | | | 1 



I I I I |HN IHHH 



I I I I I I HHTjt^H 



i-H CO 



1-1 CO 

CM 





noN 


•S[B}0I 


I 1 1 1 I HMHICW5W 


i-( 


178.35 




^ « 

D 5 

«H 




1 1 1 1 1 r-l <N | iH rH r-i 


co' 


142.56 








1 1 1 1 1 1 HH^^H 


l-H 


216.14 


o 


DENCE. 




1 HWNWiO 1 1 I 1 1 


t>- 
1-H 


9.47 


< 

H 
H 

E-c 


s 

M 

PS 

hi 




| I i—l i—i CO i—l 1 1 1 I 1 


CO 


8.16 


09 
< 


HOSPIT 




1 HNHW^ I I I I | 


i-H 


9.54 








VTION BEFORE 
LDMISSION. 




1 1 1 1 I CO I »0 »0 <N 




175.8 






1 1 1 1 I i-H (N I i-H i-H i-H 


CO 


134.4 




OS ~" 

D 

P 




1 1 1 1 1 rH tH 1 1-H 


1-H 


206.6 



oo m a 

5 +3 5 m CO (B 05 

a c c b b b b 

° ° ° » B O C 

,c a s a ^t^^h . 

ecococN»(N»o©o £ 
liSooooooo^' 

;;'H H Hw<oHiNioop pt 

.2 0) - i-H CM o 

•gp P OP 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 33 



FARM PRODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1898, to Oct. 1, 1899. 



87,096 quarts milk $3,483 84 

504 dozen eggs, 126 00 

93 tons hay, 1,395 00 

11 tons meadow hay, 88 00 

175 tons ensilage, 525 00 

152 tons green fodder, 304 00 

99| pounds asparagus, 9 96 

2,07 3J pounds rhubarb, 82 93 

507 quarts strawberries, 50 70 

125 quarts currants, 12 50 

304 bunches radishes, 30 40 

4,388 heads lettuce, 43 88 

17| bushels green peas, 17 75 

4,388 cucumbers, 87 75 

8 bushels cucumbers for pickles, 12 00 

10,613 ears sweet corn, 106 13 

15 1| bushels tomatoes, 76 87 

56 bushels beet greens, 28 00 

533 pumpkins, 26 65 

6 bushels pears, 9 00 

5,059 pounds winter squash, 50 59 

200 summer squash, 10 00 

32 bushels garden beans, 32 00 

5 bushels seed sweet corn, 5 00 

1 bushel quinces, 1 00 

2 bushels seed beans, 4 00 

10 bushels carrots, 5 00 

75 pounds horseradish, 1 50 

S\ bushels bell peppers, 4 87 

1,200 bushels potatoes, 600 00 

Amount carried forward, $7,230 32 



34 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

Amount brought forward, $7,230 32 

llf tons cabbages, 117 50 

400 bushels turnips, 200 00 

250 bushels table beets, 156 00 

150 barrels apples, 375 00 

301 pounds grapes, 6 02 

117 water melons, 11 70 

66 musk melons, 6 60 

327 bushels onions, 163 50 

14 bushels crab apples, 14 00 

50 bushels cider apples, 10 00 

400 pounds tobacco, 80 00 

150 pounds wool, 30 00 

324 pounds lamb, 66 61 

3,458 pounds pork, 178 06 

620 pounds beef, 49 60 

237 pounds veal 23 70 

45£ pounds lard, 2 70 

139| pounds chicken, ........ 20 96 

182 pounds fowl, 10 84 

800 pounds salt pork sold, 48 50 

18 calves sold, 28 00 

90 pigs sold, 270 92 

1,723 pounds round hog sold, 86 25 

12 lamb pelts sold, 4 30 

18 pounds cow hides sold, 5 20 

3 pounds calf skins sold, 3 70 

27 pounds tallow sold, 54 

6 dozen tomato plants sold, 60 

2 bushels green tomatoes, 1 00 



Total $9,202 12 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 35 



AETICLES MADE 


IN 


THE SEWING 


ROOM 


AND ON 


THE WARDS. 




Sheets, 


4/0 




. 117 


Pillow cases, .... 


IrkO 




. 309 


Pillow ticks, .... 


70 


PT. * it „ 




Table cloths 




oMgni uresses, . . 


. 117 


Napkins, . . . . 


ZOO 


Chemises, . 


. 72 


Curtains, 




Drawers, pairs, 


. 163 


Bureau covers, 


61 




3 


Commode covers, 


a 




. 13 


Towels, 


000 




. 12 


Clothes bags, .... 


OA 


oubpciiuci s, p<iira, . 


. 55 


Rugs, 


A 4 


Garters, pairs, . . 


. 28 


Dusters, 


61 




. 129 


Oven cloths, .... 





Overalls, pairs, 


. 27 


Camphor bags, 


100 


Trousers, pairs, 


5 


Floor swabs, .... 


215 




3 


Scrub cloths, .... 


86 


Stockings, pairs, 


5 


Holders, 


60 


Night shirts, . 


. 61 


Screen fillings, 


10 




9 


Stretcher, 


1 


Mittens, pairs, . 


. 72 


Carriage covers, 


5 




. 10 


Strainers, 


2 


Bandages, 


. 98 


Tea and coffee bags, 


15 




. 10 


Telephone cover, 


1 


Corset waists, . 


. 15 


Violin case, .... 


1 


Suits for burial, 


8 



36 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN 
INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Shoes, pairs, . 


6 


Checker boards, 


8 


Slippers, pairs, 


30 


Shoe benches, 


2 


Shoes repaired, pairs, . 


. 431 


Shoe rack, .... 


1 


Harnesses repaired, 


4 


Pillows renovated, . 


250 


Blanks printed, 


. 26,925 


Tag holders, .... 


335 


Overalls, pairs, 


. 101 


Whisk brooms, resewed, 


64 


Denim frocks, 


27 


Razor straps, .... 


2 


Suits, .... 


5 


Boxes covered, 


4 


Trousers, pairs, 


7 


Razor straps repaired, . 


10 


Chairs repaired, 


. 511 


Bases for base ball nine, 


3 


Carriage repaired, . 


1 


Curtains repaired, . 


50 


Type rack, 


1 


Weekly paper, copies, . 


1,600 


Tables, .... 


2 


13 weeks, 200 copies printed 




Boxes, .... 


3 


at each issue. 




Crumb scrapers, . 


8 







I 



1899.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 37 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, . $2,500 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 1,250 00 

Treasurer, per year, 300 00 

Clerk, per year, 400 00 

Stenographer, per month, 30 00 

Steward and storekeeper, per month, 50 00 

Pharmacist, per month, ........ 30 00 

Night attendants (men, 2), per month, 27 00 

Attendants (men, 9), per month, $20 00-27 00 

Night attendants (women, 2), per month, 18 00 

Attendants (women, 9), per month, 14 00-22 00 

Engineer, per year, 850 00 

Assistant engineer, per month, 50 00 

Fireman, per month, 28 00 

Helper, per month, 30 00 

Watchman, per month, 30 00 

Baker, per month, 30 00 

Cooks (4), per month, 20 00-25 00 

Assistant cooks (2), per month, 16 00-18 00 

Table girls (2), per month, 16 00-18 00 

Foreman industrial room, per month, 27 00 

Seamstress, per month, 25 00 

Laundress, per month, 20 00 

Laundryman, per month, 25 00 

Assistant laundresses (2), per month, 17 00-18 00 

Farmer, per year, 650 00 

Assistant farmers (9), per month, 20 00-28 00 

Handy man, per month, 33 00 

Gardener, per month, 40 00 

Driver, per month, 28 00 

Carpenter, per day, 2 50 

Painter, per day, [ 1 75 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT . . . . 



. . . . No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



Hospital for Epileptics 




(POST-OFFICE AST) RAILROAD STATION, PALMIER) 



Year ending September 30, 1900. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1901. 



MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... . ... No. 62. 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OP THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 

FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1900. 



^ BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1901. 

Ay 



JAN31 

STATE H0U1 




Hon 
B 

OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, Boston. 

CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary, Boston. 

BURNHAM R. BENNER, M.D., Lowell. 

ADELAIDE A. CALKINS, Springfield. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Boston. 

HENRY M. PHILLIPS, Springfield. 

HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., . - Lenox. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., Superintendent. 

ARTHUR 0. MORTON, M.D., \ Assistant Physician and 

MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., J Pathologist. 

LILLIAN M. K1NCAID, . . Clerk. 

MARY W. WENTWORTH Stenographer. 

CHARLES F. SIMONDS Steioard and Storekeeper. 

GEORGE E. BATES, Engineer. 

J. W. WILLIAMS, Farmer. 



TREASURER. 

CHARLES B. FISKE, Palmbr. 

Office at the Hospital. 



Cnmnurnhttalljjf of Jffcssacljuaetts. 



TEUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics 
respectfully present the following report for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1900. 

The time has been busily employed in the various activities 
pertaining to the work in hand. The most important enter- 
prise of the year has been the erection of the new buildings 
provided for by the legislative appropriation of $85,000 in 
1899. As noted in the preceding report, some delay in this 
work was occasioned by changes in the personnel of the admin- 
istration and by a prudent hesitation in view of the prevailing 
high prices of last year. However, these conditions furnished 
a happy compensation in extending the time for studying the 
scheme and maturing the plans. Finally, ground was broken 
in the early spring, and construction is now in progress and 
fairly well advanced. The new buildings consist of an infirm- 
ary group of one main building and two lesser ones, a cottage 
for women and a kitchen and dining-room building, which in- 
cludes an industrial room on the upper floor. They are all 
severely plain in architectural outline and interior finish, but 
substantial in utility and convenience. 

The infirmary building proper is designed to accommodate 
40 patients of both sexes, selected from those who need extra 
medical care and nursing. On the first floor there is a large 
dispensary, an operating room and another for laboratory work. 
The second floor contains apartments for medical assistants, 
and, also, two spacious rooms which for the present may be 
occupied by nurses, though intended ultimately for the use of 
special cases among the patients, — a separate home for nurses 



6 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



being one of our future needs and hopes. Space left in the 
attic of this building will be convenient for the use of night 
attendants, or other purposes, as required. In the basement 
is a large room for a mortuary, one for a special diet kitchen, 
and a third designed for hydrotherapeutic treatment, which 
will be available for patients from all parts of the hospital. 
The two smaller infirmary buildings are alike in form, one for 
women and the other for men. Each is two stories high and 
the second floors are duplicates of the first, being divided into 
a pleasant dormitory for the care of the bedridden, aged and 
crippled, a bath and clothes room, a room for attendants and 
a section by itself for observation cases and those temporarily 
agitated or noisy. Either building easily and comfortably 
provides for 30 patients. 

The separate or general cottage for women is located some 
distance away from the preceding group, in view of the likeli- 
hood of its being the first of another series. Twenty women 
is the regular number intended for this building, but there 
will be room to spare for supplementary demands. 

The next to be described is the building containing kitchen, 
dining-room and workshop. As there seemed to be no incon- 
gruity in associating these functions, and as their union encour- 
aged constructive economy, it was thought well to include them 
under the same roof. The kitchen and dining-room are on the 
first floor, the industrial room or workshop on the floor above. 
One end of the basement offers a good situation for a bakery 
and the other a place for general work, yet to be considered. 
The kitchen is of ample size and when fully equipped will 
satisfy the wants of 500 patients, an elastic margin having 
been allowed for contingencies which may arise hereafter. The 
dining-room, also, is of generous dimensions. The industrial 
room will measure 100 by 50 feet, and is to be finished into 
the roof and well lighted by windows and skylights. It will 
be capable of various uses, combining, as occasion calls for, 
besides its regular vocations, the purposes of sociability and 
entertainment. This department can hardly fail to be one of 
the most practical and interesting of any on the ground. 

All these buildings are to be supplied with water from the 
excellent general system ; steam heat will be conveyed from 
the central boiler plant through a well-constructed conduit; 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



7 



connection will be made with the sewer mains, in common with 
the older buildings, and electric lighting power will be trans- 
mitted by the most successful methods. It is expected that all 
the buildings will soon be closed in, and finished in the course 
of the coming winter. 

The Legislature of 1900 authorized an expenditure of $25,000 
for the purpose of extending the old boiler plant, which had 
become inadequate to the larger growth of the hospital. With 
this fund a satisfactory building has been constructed, two large 
boilers placed in position — with the necessary pumps and other 
connections — and the foundations laid for four additional 
boilers of the same type. 

The sum of $450 was also allowed by the Legislature of 1900 
for the purchase of the stone quarry on the hill adjoining the 
hospital land on the east. This has proved a clear benefit in 
more ways than one. It is estimated to have already saved 
the hospital $950 on foundation stone, besides the advantage 
of better and heavier material than would otherwise have been 
obtained. The quarry has thus paid a handsome return on its 
cost ; it gives useful employment to patients in breaking the 
stone for grading, or other purposes, and will doubtless supply 
the hospital with all its future requirements. It is, indeed, a 
kind of proprietary mascot and promises a large reserve of 
good fortune. 

During the year the greenhouse has been enlarged and im- 
proved by the hospital force, and considerable inside painting 
has been done from the legislative allowance of 1899, giving 
the walls and ceilings a much-needed covering and adding 
greatly to their general finish and attractiveness. 

It has been considered advisable this year to lease and occupy 
an adjoining farm, on account of the need of more pasturage, 
etc. The property contains 120 acres and includes a set of old 
farm buildings which, with the necessary changes and repairs, 
can be utilized for patients and employees. It also represents 
the main water-shed, from whence comes the flow into the hos- 
pital ice pond, rendering its control very desirable. That an 
extension of the present farming area will become practically 
indispensable in the near-by future, both for its value in return 
products and as an aid in developing plans for employment of 
patients, can scarcely be questioned. The ownership of this 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



farm is therefore believed to be a wise foresight ; and the favor- 
able terms of the present leasehold will enable its purchase at 
the reasonable price of $3,500, which sum it is hoped the Legis- 
lature will approve for that purpose at the next session. 

In the matter of current expense account it seems needful to 
ask for $15,000, the same as last year, though the larger num- 
ber of patients makes the proportionate amount substantially 
less. In addition to this, an appropriation of something over 
$45,000 is desired for special objects (but including the farm 
purchase, as already outlined), which are described more fully 
in the report of the superintendent. 

Within the past year the hospital has received from Mrs. 
Hyde, the widow of our former associate trustee, Wm. S. 
Hyde, the gift of a choice library for the cottage named in his 
memory. The donor is assured of an earnest appreciation of 
her thoughtful interest. 

Dr. Albert C. Getchell, the faithful secretary of the Board, 
resigned early in the year, having been appointed a trustee of 
the Massachusetts State Sanatorium at Rutland. His excellent 
abilities and practical sense gave him a high value among his 
fellow members. The place of secretary was filled by the elec- 
tion of Mr. Charles A. Clough, and the vacancy on the Board 
was made up by the appointment of Dr. Henry P. Jaques. 

Those more directly in touch with the daily affairs of the 
hospital deserve a word of commendation and encouragement. 
The superintendent, Dr. Flood, has proved himself able, pro- 
gressive and resourceful, and in sympathy with humane princi- 
ples of management. Drs. Morton and Hodskins are doing 
good work and gaining in usefulness and experience. The 
others in advanced positions, and those in humbler places have, 
in general, performed their parts with cheerful loyalty and 
faithfulness. 

The work is of a peculiarly harassing and responsible kind. 
The sun never sets on effort completed and is sure to rise on a 
series of new problems and pressing cares. To maintain a 
capable administration in the right spirit is to draw inspiration 
from a high standard of service and not from its depressing 
associations, which are only too obvious and characteristic. 
The altruistic sentiment must be unwavering, kept constantly 
in the foreground and fortified by dutiful resolve. The care 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 9 



of the disabled and dependent classes, to paraphrase a familiar 
modern version, is " the well man's burden;" and, whatever 
reserves the future may have in the way of social reform and 
prevention, the burden is now with us, and must be borne as 
submissively as may be. It can only be removed by a slow 
progress, in obedience to a socio-scientific enlightenment, 
towards which our civilization, perchance, is tending but has 
not yet reached. But, even under present conditions, it may 
be that the reactive influence for good upon the community 
supporting and carrying on this philanthropic work is some- 
thing of an offset to the self-sacrificing outlay. 

BURNHAM R. BENNER, Acting Chairman, 

For the Trustees. 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hosjrital for Epileptics. 
The following report is respectfully submitted : — 



Number of patients Sept. 30, 1899, 216 

Since admitted : — 

Sane (3 from visit), 76 

Insane (1 from visit), 26 

Discharged and on visit : — 

Sane — Much improved, 5 

Improved, 23 

Not improved, . . . . ' . . .9 

Died, 7 

On visit, 9 

53 

Insane. — Much improved, 1 

Improved, 3 

Not improved, 5 

Died, 12 

On visit, 1 

22 

Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1900, .... 243 

Daily average of patients, 225.61 

Per capita cost (per week), $4.52-f- 



New Buildings. 

During the year a large amount of work has been carried on 
apart from the regular routine. The largest portion of this 
extra work has been in connection with the new buildings. 

The entire plant of new buildings is now largely roofed in, 
and so far the locations of the buildings, the interior planning 
and the general design seem to work out in a satisfactory 
manner. The buildings are very plain. As to the substantial 
character and durability I think we should feel well pleased. 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



The plans for these buildings were adopted after careful study 
and the means for classification has been one of the considera- 
tions. 

Classification. 
We shall have in this plant a complete hospital group, with 
facilities for treatment, laid out on a scale large enough for 
greatly increased growth. We have also the elements of other 
groups adapted to the care and treatment of the several con- 
ditions. 

Grading, etc. 

A large amount of work will be required about the grounds 
to properly drain and grade. This we hope to do by our own 
force, but the process will of necessity extend over a long 
period of time. 

Furnishing. 

We expect to have these buildings fully completed during 
the winter months, and an appropriation for the furnishings 
will be a necessity. In this furnishing, provision should be 
made for all who can be housed in the present buildings 
and careful forethought taken for future growth. The kitchen 
and workshop are especially designed to ultimately care for 
a much larger number than can be housed at present. 

Heating. 

The heating system for the new buildings has been put in by 
day work under the direction of an engineer. This method 
was adopted in order to better take advantage of the work of 
patients aud because of diminished cost. 

Conduit. 

The conduit system which has been adopted is one which has 
been well tested in several places and the results have been 
highly satisfactory. This work is done by putting an open 
joint tile drain at the bottom of the trench and covering it with 
broken stone. Upon the broken stone is placed the lower 
half of a large-sized split tile pipe, with the concavity up. At 
intervals of 20 feet a piece of T pipe is placed, with the side 
opening on the stone. This opening is then filled in with 



12 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



cement. A frame is set in holding rollers upon which the 
steam pipes rest. All the joints between sections are thoroughly 
imbedded in cement. After the steam pipes are laid the upper 
half of the tile covering is placed on, section by section, with 
thin cement in the joints, and all the space inside is filled in 
with insulating material consisting of ground cork rolled in 
infusorial earth. Allowance is made for expansion by offsets 
and joints inside the buildings. Steam is carried in all about 
1,700 feet. 

Year's Work. 

The following summary comprises many details of the work 
of the year. Considerable new furniture has been made and 
the machinery which was purchased for the carpenter's shop 
has added very largely to this result. More than 100 pictures 
have been beautifully framed. We can probably manufacture 
furniture for the new buildings to a large extent. 

A large amount of work has been completed in the interior 
of Hyde Cottage, so that the building is now occupied by 20 
patients. Twelve patients are soon to be housed in the Farm 
Cottage and considerable work has been done in renovating 
these buildings and grounds. 

Some stone sheds have been constructed near the quarry and 
twelve summer shelters for pigs built in a distant pasture. 
Old material from discarded buildings was used for all these 
structures. 

A small greenhouse was constructed last year and this year 
we have been able by our own force to add to this, so that we 
now possess a very fair greenhouse outfit. With this we hope 
to be able to supply a moderate amount of winter vegetables 
and flowers for the wards. 

The present room for industrial purposes furnishes occupa- 
tion for 15 patients. Appliances have been added to this 
room so that a large amount of work has been carried on dur- 
ing the entire year. This will be seen by reference to the list 
below. The work has comprised cutting and making suits, 
overalls and jumpers, under garments, mittens, etc., the mak- 
ing and repairing of boots, shoes and slippers, making pillows, 
reseating chairs, printing ; and in the main has resulted in 
occupying a large number of patients and in a large increase 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



iu the work completed. The industrial room in the new build- 
ings will be much larger than the present one. 

In the wards several pursuits have been followed besides 
that of the routine housekeeping. 

The sewing-room has been carried on with, results as shown 
in the table appended. Spinning, weaving and knitting have 
been moderately successful as occupations for some women 
though we plan to do much more in these directions the coming 
season. One of the minor details of the women's work has 
been in making soft bed socks for those who suffer from cold 
feet. They are a source of great comfort to many patients 
with enfeebled circulation. 

The laundry work has been carried on as formerly and has 
furnished occupation for a considerable number of both men 
and women, while the kitchens and offices have supplied their 
usual amount of industries. It has been the effort to keep 
everybody occupied, not so much for the advantage of getting 
the work done as for the benefit derived by the worker. 

The group of men who have worked with the gardener has 
also done considerable in the way of grading around the 
buildings. 

The farm has occupied a large number of men and boys, 
and during the fall apple picking has furnished a light and 
pleasant occupation for a large group of the slightly disabled 
and weaker class of boys. 

In every other department there have been the same industry 
and earnestness exhibited. 

The gas machine which furnished the old institution with its 
light has been remodelled by odd jobs, so that now we have 
a very admirable equipment, with which the irons in the 
laundry and industrial room are heated, a gas jet supplied for 
the boiler room and gas stoves for the night attendants. It is 
also planned to connect this same supply with the new infirm- 
ary, to provide gas for the diet kitchen and laboratory. Alarm 
bells to be used in case of fire have been located in three places. 



14 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Table showing Persons employed and in what Way. 




Grading, 

Industrial building: — 

Chair-seating, 

Printing, 

Tailoring, cutting, 

Tailoring, sewing, 

Cobbling, 

Jobbing, 

Kitchens, 

Laundry, 

With yard man, 

Stone, 

tainting, 

On roads, 

Stable, 

Sewing-room, 

Ward work, 

Administration building, 

Laboratory, 

Clerical, 

Spinning, 

Weaving, 

Farm : — 

Such work as apple picking, barn, vegetable garden, 
clearing land, cutting brush, ditching, teaming, 
tending sheep, tending cows, milking, with gar- 
dener, 



20 

1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
8 
3 
2 
15 
2 
2 
2 

12 

1 
1 



Totals, 



25 



101 



Training School. 
The training school for nurses has been carried on through- 
out the year and we are about to start on our second year's 
course. An instructive prospectus is already in print and we 
expect to realize an increased enthusiasm and efficiency such as 
were foreshadowed by the first term's work. We expect to 
teach nurses not only how to care for the nervous invalid, but 
to a large degree to make them competent to do general nurs- 
ing. An effort is made to instruct the nurses as to the rules 
and customs of the institution, to imbue them with a spirit of 
kindliness and fraternity towards their patients and to help 
them realize the increased value of the services of nurses 
trained to be ladies and gentlemen. The scope of this work 
will be much enlarged when the infirmary is opened. 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 15 



Uniform. 

We shall hope a little later on to introduce for the male 
attendants a suitable uniform. This has already been adopted 
by the women. 

School. 

A school for the younger members of the institution was 
established some years ago aud this we are maintaining as a 
very useful adjunct to our work, though it has seemed wise to 
divide it into two departments, one for boys and one for girls. 

Entert ainments . 
A system of entertainments has been carried out, such as 
dances, readings, concerts, picnics during the summer, ward 
amusements for evenings and Sundays, a masquerade dance, a 
drama and one or two electric car rides for a group of the 
patients. For the last item our thanks are due to Miss Grace 
Pitts of Athol. 

Arrangements are completed for similar entertainments dur- 
ing the coming winter, and in addition to these we hope to 
complete the large tent, which is now one-third done, for out- 
door amusements when the spring weather opens. 

Religious Services. 
Services have been held at regular intervals by clergymen 
of the different denominations. Kindly visitations have also 
been made from time to time by Reverend Father Donoghue. 

Records. 

The system of medical records and the photographing of 
cases have been faithfully carried out. 

Treatment. 

The work with the static machine and the dispensary and 
laboratory work have been industriously followed up and we 
believe that much benefit has been derived thereby. 

The difficulties of treatment in this particular branch of work 
are thoroughly appreciated, and we have no disposition to 
minimize these or to assume a hopefulness which is not 
thoroughly warranted by experience. A personal element 



16 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



must be introduced in individualizing cases and the effort is 
to inspire the patient with the right degree of hope. The 
methods of treatment have been somewhat further elaborated 
this year, though the perfection of methods can only be attained 
when we are able to occupy our new infirmary and to introduce 
a more systematic treatment and several methods not now 
available. 

It has always been the plan to administer medicine where 
needed but to do this rather sparingly, other means seeming 
more efficient. The element of discipline is considered, helping 
a patient to become self-contained and not self-conscious ; and 
as a matter of fact great improvement is noted in nearly all 
cases after they become accustomed to the routine. 

The regularity of life, diet, sleep, work, the baths, massage 
and electric treatment have so far constituted our main reliance. 
We hope to carry out, in addition to this hydrotherapeutic 
treatment, hot-air treatment, Swedish movement and sugges- 
tion, with whatever medical treatment may be found to be 
efficient. 

Per Capita Cost. 
The per capita cost, as evidenced by the treasurer's report, 
shows a slight apparent increase over that of last year, but 
this is not a real increase. We have to take into consideration 
that our farmers have done a large amount of work in connec- 
tion with the new buildings ; that the progress of the work in 
our proximity has made many calls upon us which have really 
been matters of considerable expense ; and that an amount of 
coal has been purchased for warming these new buildings before 
they are occupied by patients. These with other items make 
the cost a few cents larger than last year, though by estimating, 
with proper allowance for these extraordinary expenses, the 
per capita cost is rather less than ever before. 

Illustration. 

The work at this institution is so new and comparatively un- 
known that it has been thought desirable to print an illustration 
giving a bird's-eye view of the whole plant ; this seems to have 
been admirably executed and will give a very faithful record 
of our present condition. 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



Medical Staff, etc. 
There has been no change in the medical staff this year. 
Very satisfactory work has been done and my acknowledg- 
ments are gratefully rendered for faithful and efficient service 
to my assistant physicians and office force, as well as to all 
other helpers in the hospital, to whose conscientious efforts the 
success of the year's work is largely due. 

Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
have been many times inquired about. They are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the in- 
sane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent ; in this case the approval of a judge is 
required in addition to the physicians' certificate and the notifi- 
cation of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be required at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the ad- 
dress for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London & 
Northern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River 
branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in 
Palmer, the other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from 
Boston and the railroad fare is $1.90. 

Lecturers. 

In connection with the training class of last year, our thanks 
are due to the following gentlemen for lectures delivered : Dr. 
Getchell and Dr. Miller of Worcester, Dr. Schneider, Dr. Hen- 
dee and Dr. Holbrook of Palmer, and Dr. Fuller and Dr. Rand 
of Monson. 



18 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Entertainments. 
Our thanks for evening entertainments are hereby rendered 
to Rev. F. S. Hatch and Mrs. Norcross of Monson, Rev. Father 
Donoghue of Palmer and Rev. Mr. Gerrish of Thorndike. 

Donations. 

We also gladly acknowledge donations to the hospital from 
the following persons : Rev. W. H. Hart, Mrs. Hitchcock, 
Miss Mabel W. Sedgwick, Mrs. George Ezekiel, Mr. Frank 
Carpenter, Mr. W. D. Clark, Mr. C. F. Grosvenor, Mr. C. E. 
Fish and Mr. Frank A. Royce of Palmer, Mrs. W. S. Hyde 
of Ware, Rev. Dr. J. S. Lemon and Mrs. A. S. Butler of 
Gardner, and Mrs. Celeste Hulbert of Oakland, Cal. 

Appropriations. 
The details of the appropriations as they appear to be re- 
quired are given below. Each one of these items has been 
made up with care, and with the same eye to economy of ex- 
penditure that we would use in our private business. There 
are many other matters requiring outlay of money, but with 
the purpose of reducing our appropriation to the lowest figure 
consistent with good management, we have eliminated from the 
list all except what are considered pressing and important 
matters. I earnestly recommend making application for these 
detailed sums. 



1. Current expenses, $15,000 00 

2. Furnishings for new buildings, 22,400 00 

3. Special fittings and appliances for infirmary, kitchen, in- 

dustrial room, etc., 2,500 00 

4. Laundry machinery, 3,500 00 

5. Extension of electric light plant, 600 00 

6. Piggery, 2,000 00 

7. Coal shed, 3,200 00 

8. Purchase of farm, 3,500 00 

9. Repair and extension of farm buildings, .... 5,000 00 

10. Purchase of additional land, 1,000 00 

11. Inside painting, 1,100 00 

12. Additional furnishings for present offices, .... 400 00 



f 60,200 00 



EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



19 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

I beg to submit herewith the following report of the finances 
of this institution for the year ending Sept. 30, 1900 : — 



Assets. 



Real estate, 
Xew buildings, . 
Old buildings, . . 
Water and sewerage systems, 



Personal estate : — 
Live stock on the farm, .... 
Produce of the farm on hand, . 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding in inmates' department 
Other furniture in inmates" department, . 
Personal property of State in administration 

building and employees' cottage, 
Ready-made clothing, 
Dry goods, 

Provisions aud groceries, . 
Drugs and medicines, 

Fuel 

Library, .... 
Other supplies undistributed, 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1899, 

Received from State appropriations : — 

Appropriation 1895 for building, 

Cottage for patients, 1899, 

Infirmary building, 1899, . 

Amounts carried forward, . 



$23,013 00 
85,000 00 
37,770 00 

30,200 00 



$4,941 50 

5,486 80 
2,879 30 
20,906 16 
3,743 90 
5,264 02 



7,026 54 

765 98 

1,801 73 

2,075 01 

890 07 

5,844 00 

560 00 

5,986 73 



£5,920 24 
6,076 40 
21,183 69 



$175,983 00 



168,171 74 



$11,381 08 



$33,180 33 $11,381 08 



20 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Amounts brought forward. 

Received from State appropriations — Con. 
Furnishing men's cottage, 1899, 
Inside painting, 1899, 
Equipping workroom, 1899, 
Machinery for shops, 1899, 
For current expenses, 1899, 
For current expenses, 1900, 
Boiler plant, 1900, . 
Stone quarry, 1900, . 



Total from appropriations, 
Received from State for board of patients, 
Received from towns for board of patients 
Received from individuals for board of pa 

tients, 

Received from farm and farm products, . 
Received from sale of old junk, barrels, etc., 
Received from patients for safe keeping 
Received from store, 
Received from interest, . . 
Received from sundries, . 



$33,180 33 $11,381 

1,100 00 

493 14 

363 15 

750 00 
3,977 65 
6,287 63 
10,804 61 

450 00 



$11,334 22 
23,983 11 

2,592 11 
990 36 
140 27 
321 54 
243 61 
144 71 
100 94 



57,406 51 



39,850 87 



Total receipts, $108,638 46 



Expenditures 

Salaries, wages and labor, 
Provisions and supplies : — 

Meat, . . . . 

Fish, . . . ... 

Fruit and vegetables, 

Flour, 

Grain and meal for table, . 

Hay, grain and meal for stock, 

Tea, coffee and chocolate, . 

Sugar, syrup and molasses, 

Milk, butter and cheese, . 

Salt and other groceries, . 

All other provisions, . 



$2,565 33 
514 95 
663 63 

1,396 54 
370 13 

1,278 41 
367 56 

1,123 93 

2,226 47 
773 64 

1,529 67 



$24,034 78 



12,810 26 



Amount carried forward, 



$36,845 04 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 21 



Amount brought forward^ $36,845 04 

Clothing, 1,540 51 

Fuel and lights, 3,321 96 

Water, 600 00 

Medicine and medical supplies, 1,715 52 

Furniture, beds and bedding, 914 85 

Transportation, 684 73 

Expenses of superintendent and trustees, .... 351 14 

Ordinary repairs, . . . . . . . — . . 2,220 86 

All other current expenses, ....... 5,045 50 



Total current expenses, $53,240 11 

Paid to patients, ......... 273 60 

Paid expenses account of patients, 19 16 

Other extraordinary expenditures, ...... 47,141 23 



Total expenditures, $100,674 10 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1900, 7,964 36 

$108,638 46 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, $7,964 36 

Bills receivable for board, .... 11,028 66 
Unexpended appropriations available, . . 80,730 08 

$99,723 10 

Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, ...... $2,244 67 

Miscellaneous bills, 2,082 33 

Money belonging to patients, .... 253 47 

Maintenance paid in advance, .... 657 11 

Construction bills, 12,437 91 

17,675 49 

$82,047 61 

Dividing the total current expenditures ($53,240.11) by the 
average number of patients (225.61) shows an average 
annual cost per patient of $235 98-)- 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of ... 4 52-f- 



22 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1900. 



Statement of Appropriations. 



Ar JrrCUlrKIA 1 1UW o. 


Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
this Year. 


Balance 
available. 


Appropriation, 1895, buildings, 


$160,000 


00 


$154,079 76 


$5,920 24 




Current expenses, 1899, 


20,000 


00 


12,983 27 


3,977 65 


_* 


Cottage for patients 


10,000 


00 




6,076 40 


$3,923 60 


Infirmary building, .... 


75,000 


00 




21,183 69 


53,816 31 


Furnishing men's cottage, T 


1,100 


00 




1,100 00 




Inside painting, 


500 


00 


6 86 


493 14 


- 


Equipping workroom, 


500 


00 


54 44 


363 15 


82 41 


Machinery for shops, .... 


750 


00 




750 00 




Current expenses, 1900, 


15,000 


00 




6,287 63 


8,712 37 


Boiler plant, 


25,000 


00 




10,804 61 


14,195 39 


Stone quarry 


450 


00 




450 00 






$308,300 


00 


$167,124 33 


$57,406 51 


$80,730 08 



* Lapsed. 

CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 



The undersigned hereby certifies that he has compared the amount received for board 
and care of patients for the year ending Oct. 1, 1900 ($37,909.44), with the estimated earn- 
ings of the hospital for the year, and finds them to agree. He finds vouchers on file at 
the hospital for disbursements for current expenses to the amount of $53,240.11. The 
treasurer's account is correctly cast, and shows a balance in his hands of $7,964.36. 

GEO. L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 

Approved: Chas. A. Clotjgh, 

Henry M. Phillips, 

Auditing Committee. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



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26 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 





•bibiox 


<N(NN 


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TOTAL, 




HH(N 


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TOTAL. 




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i— I i— 1 l— 1 i— 1 


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ej £ o <d 



. - 

"co 3 
- 3 CD 



H-5 [si ^ < ^ ^ C« 



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o 

(V 

o 

o 
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g 



1900 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 









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^H OS CM t>» OS CO *0 CO 


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t>- GO CO 


GOGOCOI>-GOCOaOOsC5 


CO 


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OS CO 




CO 


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a 




CN CM »0 




o 




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COt^COCOOOiOCOOS 


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CO CO CO 






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H H 


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iO CM CO 


COCOt^HCOCOCOt^CM 




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^ ^ ^ 


NHOOWHOniNo' 


CO 


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CO OS iO *0 CO CO CM OS 


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OS CO -tf 


COGOCOi-HOSr-lOSCOO. 


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t>- CO GO 


t^t^OOh-OOHO 










CO CO CO 


COCO'^l^CO^-^TjH'stl 


s 








HHH 


j— t i—i r- It- 1 r li— 1 H H »— 1 


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O N CO 


OCO»OCMI>.COCOOGO 


CO 




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O CO to 


coosiococococoot^ 


CO 




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1 1 




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H H O 


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t>- 1~ t~ 




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CO N 


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OS CM t>. 


OOSCOCOOCO»OCOOS 












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CD N N 


l^COCOCOt^CO-H/i-^CM 


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CO CO CO 


COCOOCOCOCOCOCOCO 


CO 



•8IBJ0X 



•89IBK 



t-H t-h CO CO CM I CM CM CM 



rH | HHH | H | | j t- 



I H CM CM H I t— i CM CM 



| Sh h 



I I CM H | | | H H I t> 



I I I I I I I I I I rH rH 



•83[«H 



HHHHCM I CM H CM 



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H | H | H | H | H 



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| H I H H | H H H 



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a> 

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Ha S <5 1-5 ^ <J 72 



-3 ^3 



28 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

3. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



Cases admitted. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


INSANE. 


SANE. 


TOTALS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First, 


6 


13 


19 


39 


25 


64 


45 


38 


83 


Second, 


3 


3 


6 


5 


3 


8 


8 


6 


14 










1 




1 


1 




1 


Total of cases, . 


9 


16 


25 


45 


28 


73 


54 


44 


98 


Total of persons, 


8 


16 


24 


42 


28 


70 


50 


44 


94 



4. — Relations to Hospitals of Cases admitted. 





Insane 




Sane. 


1 Totals 




HOSPITAL RELATIONS. 




CO 






CO 






CO 






Males. 


FemaL 


Totals. 


Males. 


FemaL 


Totals 


J 

03 

S 


Femal 


Totals 


Inmates of this hospital only, . 


6 


10 


16 


29 


23 


52 


35 


33 


68 


Former inmates of this hospital 




















only, 


2 


2 


4 


6 


3 


9 


8 


5 


13 


Former inmates of other hos- 




















pitals : — 




















Danvers Insane Hospital 




















and Hospital Cottages 




















for Children, 




1 


1 










1 




Danvers Insane Hospital, 








1 




1 


1 






Hospital Cottages for 




















Children, 




1 


1 


6 




6 


6 


1 




Northampton Insane Hos- 






























1 


1 




1 




State Almshouse, 








1 




1 


1 






Taunton Insane Hospital, 




1 


1 










1 




Westborough Insane Hos- 




















pital, .... 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Worcester Insane Hos- 




















pital, .... 




1 


1 


2 




2 


2 


1 


3 


Total of cases, . 


9 


16 


25 


45 


28 


73 


54 


44 


98 


Total of persons, 


8 


16 


24 


42 


28 


70 


50 


44 


94 



1900.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 

















CO 




■)TAL 


•Bjaqi«£ 


CN 




















I :: i— -r — ?! — 1 


f O CO CO 1 Ht rH rH CN 1 


3 


■ 


n 


•sjaqjojv 










hS 


OTAI 


a 


•sjaqiBtf 








rH CO h} 1 CO 1 iO rH CN rH t*. 


H* 


Eh 


a 




©5 






1 >C CN SN 1 CO rH rH CN 1 






00 


•sjaqjoj^ 








1 00 rH | t— | | | IQ 


o 




9 

< 


•sjaqiB^ 


S 








g 






'SJOaptfJ 


CO 

co 


rH 1 


1 CN 1 4HH 1 1 


1 lOHH 1 rH 1 | 1 | 


o 






•Bjaqjoj^ 






1 CO 1 CN 1 i-t 1 rH 




o 
g 




| TOTAL 


•BiaqiBjj 


s 






rH — t t— i ^ rH CN 1 'O 








CO 


1-H 1 


1 MH^HN 1 1 


1 00 CO CN 1 rH rH I 1 


o 




CD 
Eel 


•saaqiOT^ 








t —.—j.^.^m | CO rH 1 | CN 


00 
CN 


H 
*4 


MAL] 


'siaqjB^ 








rH CO CO CN 1 CN rH rH ] CO 


3 | 


a 


•sjaaiiBjj 


CO 


1 1 




1 Tf 1 CO rH rH | | 


00 
<N 






'sjaqioj^ 






1 CN 1 CN 1 CO 1 rH 


1 t"" CN rH | CO 1 1 1 CO 


CN 

H, 




9 


•siaqjB^ 








| oo CN CN rH t 1 rH 1 CN 


CN 








to 

<M 


i-l 1 


IN I^Hrt 1 1 


|hihh in i | | | 


CN 




CO 


•saaqioj^ 










CN 




)TAL 


•BjaqjBji 










CN 




E- 








1 1 1 1 1 1 l—< 1 


1 CN 1 rH | | I I CN 1 




a 


Ea 


•sjaqioj^ 










CO 


fSAN 


MAL] 


•saaqiBjl 










CO 




» 






| | 


1 1 1 1 1 1 |H | 


1 rH | rH | | | I CN 1 


CO 






•saaqiojn 


CN 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 rH CN 1 1 rH 1 1 1 CN 


00 




ALE: 


•sjaq^ 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 rH 1 1 I rH 1 1 1 CN 


CO 




S 






1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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CD 



"a S » u « *r « £ „ 

c >> t> :> s. i a CS ea — e _s 



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a ~ -o a 

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<3OH0rCrH--iaQaDr3 



30 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


COUNTIES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, .... 


_ 


— 


- 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


Berkshire, .... 


- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


2 


4 


6 


Bristol, 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


2 


4 


6 


Essex, 








3 


3 


6 


3 


. 3 


6 


Hampden, .... 


2 


2 


4 


4 




4 


6 


2 


8 


Hampshire, .... 










3 


3 




3 


3 


Middlesex, .... 


2 




2 


11 


4 


15 


13 


4 


17 


Norfolk, . . . 




1 


1 


2 




2 


2 


1 


3 


Plymouth, .... 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Suffolk, 


3 


10 


13 


9 


10 


19 


12 


20 


32 


Worcester, .... 




1 


1 


9 


1 


10 


9 


2 


11 


Totals, .... 


8 


16 


24 


42 


28 


70 


50 


44 


94 



1900.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No 



62. 



31 



m r< 
c3 £ 
o — 

Sh'W 

o o 

. 03*03 
-» S'O Lib 



goo-. 


t— t- 


r 1 


oo oo 

(M CM 


CI lOH 


*a en 


rH 1 1 




1 1 1 


1 I 


rH 1 1 




~ ' > 




rH , | 




1 1 1 


I I 


SO 1 1 


so so 


<M 1 1 


cm cm 


■* 1 1 


— — 


SO 00 rH 


iO CM 

so so 


geo . 


CM CM 


eo"^ 


Oh 







gas 


oo so i 






-<*■ s 
in in 


M 1 1 


tM CM 


H 1 1 





rH 1 1 


' 


eo<M i 


»o o 


eo tM i 




1 1 1 


1 1 


os i i 




lO 1 1 


Hi o 


1 1 




OS CM rH 
COrH 


CM CO 
CO 


OS-* 1 

<M 


M eo 
eo eo 


O X rH 


a> ta 


Total of persons 



32 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

8. — Occupations of Persons admitted. 

MALES. 



Insane. 


» 

8 
si 

03 


Totals. 




Insane. 


a 

81 

00 


Totals. 


Book agent, 




1 


1 


Laborer, . 




1 


1 


Cabinet maker, . 




1 


1 


Machinists, 




3 


3 


Carpenters, 




3 


3 


Mason, 




1 


1 


Clerk, 




1 


1 


Merchant, 




1 


1 


Coachmen, 




2 


2 


Weavers, . 




2 


2 


Errand boy, 


1 




1 


Unknown, 


7 


24 


31 


Farmers, . 




2 


2 




8 


42 


50 


FEMALES. 


Clerk, 




1 


1 


Weavers, . 




3 


3 


Domestics, . 


1 


6 


7 


Wood carving, 




1 


1 


Errand girl, 




1 


1 


Unknown, 


13 


15 


28 


Housewives, 


2 


1 


3 











DAUGHTER OR WIFE OF — 



Brewer, 


1 




1 


Machinist, 


1 


1 


2 


Conductor, 




1 


1 


Peddler, . 




1 


1 


Engineer, . 




1 


1 


Printer, . 




1 


1 


Farmer, 


1 


2 


3 


Teamster, 


2 




2 


Laborer, 


8 


6 


14 


Shoemaker, 




1 


1 


Liveryman, 




1 


1 




29 


43 


72 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 33 



9. — Probable Causes of Disease in Persons admitted. 





Insane. 




Sane. 








Males. 


| Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


■ Totals. 


| Totals. 


Alcoholism, 


— 




— 


1 




1 


1 


Blow over stomach, . 








1 




1 


1 


Congenital, 


2 




2 




1 


1 


3 


Excitement, 




— 


- 




1 


1 


1 


Fright, 




1 


1 




2 


2 


3 


Grief, .... 


- 


1 


1 








1 


Heredity, . 


— 


— 


— 


2 




9 


2 


Injury to head, . 


2 




2 


7 


4 


11 


13 


Masturbation, 


— 


— 


— 




1 


1 


1 


Menopause, 


— 


— 


- 




1 


1 


1 


Menstruation, . 


- 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


Overwork, . 


— 


— 




2 


1 




3 


Puberty, 


— 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


Scarlatina, . 




2 


2 








2 


Sunstroke, . 








1 






1 


Syphilis, 








1 




1 


1 


Teething, . 








3 


1 




4 


Tobacco, . 








1 




! 


1 


Typhoid fever, . 








1 






1 


Whooping-cough, 










1 




1 


Unknown, . 


4 


10 


14 


22 


13 


35 


49 


Totals, 


8 


16 


24 


42 


28 


70 

1 


94 



34 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 





•8Ib;ox 


CO 


1 CM 




tO 


I CM 






rH 


s 

55 
«< 


•sapjraej; 


CO 
CM 


1 1 


CO 


1 


1 1 




1 

<M 


o 

rH 


as 


























1 CM 


OS 


tO 


1 CM 


CO 


CO rH 

CM 





•8TO0X 



oo IcotNco | cm ^ o> th t> 

C5 r-J tO i-l 



| I CO CM I I t— I CO | r-t 

CO H 



6 
8 

I 



CO I I I CM t I I rH I iH 



OS I rH I ! I I I CO I r-t 



03 

o 
o 
<x> 
J- 

£ .2 



CD 

2 

Oh 

a 

• rH 

rC 

o 
S3 

a 



Oh 

a 



© .2 

O Oh 

rl CO 

Oh a 

a o< 

.5 CD 



Oh 

CD 

go 

.2 

[3 

a 

CD 

03 



o 

HH 

cd 

a 



1900.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



I IH | | I (NiOMH | | | 



I I I I I I HCON I | I I 



CD CO 

o 



I I H | | I H N H H | | | 



I CO I I | | I I I I I I CO CO CO iO 



I l— I i-H I I I i— I I i— < I I I CM 



CO CO CM 





a 

H 


Totals. 


1 >o CO CO 


1 CO CM CM CM CM I 


1 1 


iO 
CM 


CM 


28.5 




EN ADMITT 


Females. 




1 i— 1 i— 1 CM CM CM 1 


1 1 


CO 


co 
i— < 


31.87 


ADMITTED. 


K 
fc 


Males. 


1 H^H 


1 CM i— 1 ! | | | 


1 1 


as 


CO 


22.5 


















Persons 


M 

O 


Totals. 


^ CO CM 1 


1 1 i-H | l-H .-1 1 


1 CO 


iO 
CM 


CM 


13.18 




ATTA 




co co i I 


1 |H |HH | 


1 CM 


CO 
rH 


CO 

T-i 


CO 

*o 




FIRST 


Fem 












iO 
1— ( 




H 
<1 


Males. 


HiO(N | 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 i-H 


Oi 


CO 


9.06 



• • CO »1 !B CO (B IB tC CO 02* • • 
. g t>» f>» ^ t>» t»» >"» ^ . 

^o»oo«oooooo aT 

r^j CN CO CO "O CO N 00 
'-fflOOOOOOOOOcu „ 

rt t-i-iCMCMCOCO'^iOCOC^g g 



CD 03 _ 



OD 



p. 



CP 

a 

03 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



o 

2 
3 

§ 

o 

a> 
M 
■ 


AT TIMR OF DBATII. 


Totals. 


I |H«iHH |H < I 1 I 1 


h. t« 

CM 


■ 

3 

a 

5 


m h m i u i i m 


CM 


"3 


1 1 HNHH | I | I | | 


O CC rH 
OS 

CM 


AT FIRST ATTACK. 


o 
H 


i-HCQC*||i-f||||||| 


t> <o 
cm 


■ 

• 

a 

9 

6s. 


1 t - — • t 1 1 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 


t> 


3 


•HeOflH | | *-4 I 4 1 I | 1 | 


SO CO CO 

o 


Q 
M 

H 

a 

00 

z 

O 
as 

n 

ss 


a 

a 

E4 
g 

5 
< 

ss 
£ 


■ 

5 

o 
r- 


i «cceo(ON»H(N I I I 


CO O 

t«» t»» »o 


00 

e 

1 


1 1 OOCCCOH^ 1 (N 1 1 1 


» 00 H 

00 

cm 


■ 

a 
S 


1 :C !C ^ O M rH (N - i | | | 

1—1 1—1 


»0 CM O 

DC 
CM 


AT FIRST ATTACK 


30 

I 


ODIOHIO0 |H |H I 1 1 CO 


CO O *- 
t"» fc""» CO 


■ 

= 

■ 


CN iQ ^ <N <M 1 i~l 1 i-H 1 1 1 *H 


co go ao 

CO 
I— 1 


1 


(OONCO^ 1 I 1 1 1 1 |iO 
CM 


»C <N iO 

. yft CM 


OB 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, .... 
From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years, 

70 to 80 years, 
Over 80 years, .... 
Unknown, 

Total of cases, .... 

Total of persons, 

Mean ages, .... 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 37 



| | | | | 


S S oo 

00 
CO 


j I I i—i 1 I tH CO <N I I | | 


t*. »o 

00 

CM 
<* 


1 | (NfNHHHCOHH | | | 


CM CM t*< 
rH rH © 

CO 

CO 


— t-COl 1 l^|i"H| 1 1 O 


as Oi 

rH t-H O 

CO 
i—l 


1 CO 1-4 I I I I 1 1 I t I GO 


t> t> o 

o 

o 

rH 


i-i (N 1 | |(M|r-l| | | CM 


CM CM lO 
rH i—l 

CO 
1— 1 


lao^coacci^GOCo^ 1 1 I 


as os © 

CO 

CM 


1 ^ i-i 00 CO "cH CM CO CM 1 1 I 


Tj< TfH 1— 1 

-j. — 

d 

CO 


1 ^ O C O iO O) IM H | | | | 
CM t— 


© CO 
»Q »0 OS 

CM 
CM 


NXMiO'O 1 N 1 (NH | 1 C5 


ao rh CO 

CM 
i-l 


IN |NH | 1 CO 


^ ^ O 
rH 


t>- '-O CS CO rJH 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 CO 

CM 


^ O 

o *o iO 

d 
i—i 


Congenital, . . . 

16 years and less, .... 

From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years, 

70 to 80 years, 
Over 80 years, .... 
Unknown, 

Total of cases, .... 

Total of persons, 

Mean ages, .... 



38 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



•8ITJ10X 



a as 



a * 



OK** 



•SlB}OX 



H T» 00 



•si^ox 



•sap?rc 



i— I CM (M 00 o 



- oQ 

° 3 cc 



i i —i 



S « 5 u 



•saitfinaj 



cs 



•si^ox 



•991BK 



I IS S 51 O H 



a as 

S ^ 



•sibjox 



•safBinaj 



« S3 



en ~ r < 

M SD •< g 



•8Tt??ox 



•S91BOI9J 



S 5 5 a 

= fl fl h 

o © o £ 

g s 1 £ 



a « « 
o 

goo 

i-t i-H eo 

P Eh 



3 2 5 5 



o P 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Totals. 




O r-l CM CM 
CM 


CO CO 




OJ rH rH 1 
rH 


GN CM 




tH 1 T-l CM 

t— 1 CO 


^ CO 

"H 


Died. 




CM 1 t>- 1 

tH 


Ci 35 




CO 1 rH | 






CO 1 CO 1 


CM CM 
rH rH 


Not Epileptic. 


•sit?;ox 


II II 


1 1 




II II 


1 1 




II II 


1 1 


Not Improved. 




rH CO i—l 




•saiBcna^ 


GN T-l || 


CO CO 


*s9iBj\[ 




rH r-l 


Improved. 




CO 1 CN rH 

CM 


CO CO 
CM CM 




r— 1 1 h*. | 


GO GO 


•S9JBJ\[ 


CM 1 »0 rH 
rH 


CO 00 


Much Improved. 




rH | lO 1 


CO CO 




1 1 CO 1 




•89XBJ\[ 


rH | CM 1 


CO CO 


Recovered. 


•81BJOX 


II II 


1 1 


•89IBra9,i 


II II 


1 1 . 


•89IBH 


II II 


1 1 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


A. — Insane epileptics : — 
First, .... 
Second, .... 

B. — Sane epileptics : — 
First, .... 
Second, .... 

Total of cases, . 
Total of persons, 



40 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



15, — Causes of Death. 





Insane. 




Sane. 




TOTAI.8. 


CAUSES. 


Males. 
Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


3 
"5 

1 
fa 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 


















Epilepsy,. 


5 2 


7 


4 




4 


9 


2 


11 


Status epilepticus, . 


- 1 


1 


- 


- 






1 


1 


Circulatory system : — 


















Pneumonia, 


- 1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Pulmonary cedema, . 


- 1 


1 










1 


1 


Genito-urinary system : — 


















Chronic parenchymatous 
nephritis, 






1 




1 


1 




1 


General : — 




J 














Asthenia senilis, 


- 1 


1 










1 


1 


Exhaustion, . . . , 


1 - 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Totals, .... 


6 6 


~12~ 


6 


1 


7 


12 


7 


19 



1900.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



O J 
3 K 



I I I I H | OCONH | 



I I I I I I CONH I I CO I 



I I I I r-i | N H H H | 



o « 

n s 



•S31BCQ9J; 



I I I I I I I I I CO CO 



I I I I I I i-l rH CNJ 



I I I I I I HHHTjflO 



I I I I I I I I I CO CO 



I I I I I I i-H tH t— I i— I 



I I I I I co I I I I I <o co 



I I I I i—l CO CM I I I I 



3 » 

25 



•S8IBI\[ 



I | | | I I i-l H <M CO iO 



I I I I I I I I I coco 



I t I I I I Hrlff) I CM 



w m » 

fl fl b 

O O O C3 CI C3 W 
S 2 S © * <D « 

^-dSd^t^^^.. 

W(CN(NU500 £ 
H (N ci 

• ••2hhco(oh(niooo ^ ,22 
.2 § u H(N o ^ 

^ a - a ° 



- o 

•^gooooooo 



® S a R > a M 



o « s 



d 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



All Attacks. 


WHOLE KNOWN PERIOD OF 
HOSPITAL RESIDENCE. 




1 I ' _j ro rvi 1 I I 1 I 
1 | i-H rH vj GN I I I I | 


^ C5 

os 




1 1 1 1 1 rH | | | | | 


rH CO 




1 I HHCOH | | | | | 


CO CO 
CO 


WHOLE KNOWN PERIOD OF 
DISEASE. 


•81BJ0X 


rH | | | | | | <NtH 1 1 


7 

174.85 


•saiBinaj 


r it it ii «—* ii i 


rH O 
OS 


•saiBH 


r-l | | | | | | tH^ 1 | 


CO O 
CO 


Last Attack. 


WHOLE DURATION OF 
ATTACK. 


•sibiox 


rH 1 1 1 1 1 I C* J I 


7 

174.85 


•sajBinaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t-H 1 1 1 


rH O 

Ci 


•881UJ\[ 


r-4 | | | I I | i-*"* | | 


CO OS 
CO 
rH 


HOSPITAL RESIDENCE. 


•81B50J, 


I 1 HHWN 1 1 1 1 1 


t> CM 
O 

OS 


•saiBcaaj 


1 1 1 1 1 rH | | | | | 


rH CO 
rH 


•S3IBJ\[ 


1 | rH r-l CO t-H 1 I | I 1 


CO CO 

CO 


DURATION BEFORE 
ADMISSION. 


"8[BJOX 


rH I 1 1 1 I <N 1 tH | 1 


7 

161.14 


•saiBtaaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 rH | | | | 


rH CN 


•S9IBK 


r-4 | | | | | rH | | | 


CO r-i 
CO 


Q 
c 

5 


Epileptic : — r 

Congenital, . . : 

Under 1 month, 

From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 
Over 20 years, 
Unknown, 

Totals, 

Average in months, . 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



43 



1 1 *— < «m rvi »A ro ryi .—4 I 
I | r-n ^g 1 v»^4 | 


19 
98.24 


1 1 | 1 I HCONH | | 


7 

154.26 


| | rHrH-H/l,— iCMrHi— ItH | 


12 

65.54 


t-i I i i i i hcoo^io 


19 
218.7 


I I I 1 I I IH ICOCQ 


t>. CM 

CO 
CO 


tH | | | | 1 H (M iO H (N 


12 
173.4 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH I CO CO 


t» CM 
CO 
CO 


r-l | | | | I H (M O H (M 


12 
173.4 


I | HHT?H(N 1 I I 1 
rH 


19 
17.63 


1 1 1 1 I t- 1 1 1 1 1 


CO 

rH 


| | HH^^CI | | | | 


12 
16.58 


rH | | | | | CO rH CO CO tO 


19 

200.57 


1 1 1 1 1 1 tH | | COCO 


tO 

o 

CO 


rH | | | | | NHO | (N 


12 
157.8 



1 3 a 



CQ GO «! 

r£3 Jfl J3 - - - - 
.^+3 1! !B 03 CO 03 . 

a a a % % % % 

O O O W S3 TO 03 

5 5 g a) cp cp cd 

^COcOCMCNiOOO U 
. O 1-1 rH CM 03 

©ooooootL 

t-> +3 +3 +3 -m P% ; 



•grHrHCOCOrHCMlOOO^ ^ 



.J5 CP S-i 

nil 



H(N 

cp M 
> S3 
OP 



CP* 

2 

CP 



44 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



FARM PRODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1899, to Oct. 1, 1900. 



Milk, 121,074 quarts, $4,842 96 

Eggs, 131£ dozen, 82 87 

Hay, 156 tons, 2,808 00 

Meadow hay, 13 tons, 130 00 

Ensilage, 225 tons, 675 00 

Green fodder, 124 tons, 372 00 

Asparagus, 27 pounds, 270 

Rhubarb, 1,439 pounds, 57 56 

Strawberries, 289 quarts, 34 68 

Blackberries, 65 quarts, 7 80 

Currants, 357 quarts, . . . . ' 35 90 

Celery, 400 bunches, 40 00 

Parsley, 100 bunches, 10 00 

Lettuce, 7,309 heads 73 09 

Green peas, 95 bushels, 95 00 

Cucumbers, 5,568, 126 38 

Cucumbers for pickles, 3 T ^ bushels, 4 60 

Sweet corn, 11,658 ears, 116 58 

Tomatoes, 77 bushels, . 38 50 

Beet greens, 85| bushels, 42 85 

Pumpkins, 320, 16 00 

Winter squash, 2,757 pounds, 27 57 

Summer squash, 56, 2 80 

Garden beans, 36| bushels, 36 75 

Peaches, 1 bushel 2 00 

Pears, 17f bushels, 26 62 

Quinces, \ bushel, 50 

Apples, 350 barrels, 525 00 

Cider apples, 600 bushels, 60 00 

Crab apples, 31^ bushels, 31 50 

Watermelons, 42, 4 20 



Amount carried forward^ $10,329 41 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



— No. 62. 



45 



Amount brought forward, $10,329 41 

Plums, \\ bushels, 1 25 

Grapes, 712£ pounds, 14 25 

Radishes, 100 bunches, 1 00 

Horseradish, 80 pounds, 1 60 

Peppers, 3^ bushels, 1 75 

Potatoes, 1,452 bushels 943 80 

Cabbage, 1\ tons, 150 00 

Turnips, 255 bushels, 127 50 

Table beets, 455 bushels, 273 00 

Carrots, 3641 bushels, 182 75 

Onions, 110i bushels, 71 82 

Parsnips, 314 bushels, 185 40 

Tobacco, 400 pounds, 80 00 

Broom corn, \ acre, 25 00 

Wool, 339 pounds, 67 80 

Lamb, 562£ pounds, 98 16 

Pork, 3,487 pounds, 213 75 

Beef, 1,724 pounds, 100 68 

Lard, 45i pounds, 2 73 

Chicken, 9^ pounds, 1 52 

Fowl, 178 pounds, 24 92 

Mutton, 384| pounds, 30 78 

Pigs sold, 68, 257 62 

Calves sold, 21, 93 50 

Beef sold • 243 00 

Hides sold, 290 pounds, 19 06 

Tallow sold, 126 pounds, 3 78 

Wool sold, 528 pounds, 105 60 

Pork sold, 1,780 pounds 106 80 

Onions sold, 55^ bushels, 24 55 

Cabbage sold, 220 heads, 10 52 

Hogs' heads sold, 255 pounds, 5 28 

Sheep pelts sold, 22, 13 75 

Strawberry plants sold, 30 

Bell peppers sold, 50 

Cabbage plants sold, 775, 1 70 



Total, 



$13,814 83 



46 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



ARTICLES MADE IN THE SEWING-ROOM. 



Sheets, .... 


37 


Night dresses, 


8 


Pillow cases, 


503 


Chemise, .... 


1 


Pillow ticks, . 


212 


Drawers, pairs, 


32 


Table cloths, 


24 


Night shirts, .... 


2 


Napkins, 


293 


Shirts, 


215 


Curtains, 


31 


Overalls, pairs, 


2 


Bureau covers, 


18 


Suspenders, pairs, 


26 


Commode covers, 


5 


Garters, pairs, 


16 


Towels, 


794 


Stockings, pairs, . 


6 


Holders, 


17 


Mittens, pairs, 


25 


Oven cloths, . 


4 


Caps, 


5 


Strainers, 


4 


Bibs, 


43 


Dusters, 


44 


Sleeve linings, 


3 


Floor swabs, . 


36 


Screen fillings, 


32 


Rugs, .... 


43 


Pipe covering, yards, . 


92 


Clothes bags, 


on 

ou 


Sola pillow, .... 


1 


Clothes-pin bags, . 


7 


Awnings, .... 


8 


Tea and coffee bags, 


28 


Mattress, .... 


1 


Aprons, .... 


92 






. ARTICLES 


MADE 


IN THE WARDS. 




Sheets, .... 


59 


Night dresses, 


52 


Pillow cases, 


54 


Chemises, .... 


63 


Napkins, 


, 44 


Drawers, pairs, 


35 


Curtains, 


17 


Night shirt, .... 


1 


Towels, 


160 


Mittens, pairs, 


35 


Dusters, 


2 


Bed socks, pairs, . 


18 


Scrub cloths, 


36 


Dresses, .... 


112 


Sawdust bags, 


20 


Dress skirts, .... 


2 


Ice bag covers, 


\ ' 2 


Shirt waists, .... 


4 


Aprons, 


54 


Bandages, .... 


493 



1900.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 47 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED 1ST THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Shoes made, pairs, 


4 


Ball gloves rej^aired, . 


2 


Boots made, pairs, 


6 


Screens made, 


48 


Boots and shoes repaired, . 


664 


Screens repaired, . 


1 


Slippers made, pairs, . 


66 


Coat hangers made, 


468 


Shoes marked, pairs, . 


164 


Corn crackers made, . 


3 


Suits made, 


49 


Hammer handles made, 


14 


Coats made, .... 


94 


Bases made for base ball 




Vests made, .... 


12 


nine, 


3 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


139 


Medicine cases made, . 


4 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


177 


Pipe rack made, . 


1 


Denim frocks made, 


22 


Bill boards made, 


8 


Shirts made, 


32 


Rolling pin made, 


1 


Mittens made, pairs, 


197 


Blacking box made, 


1 


Garments repaired, 


16 


Clothes stick made, 


1 


Rubber aprons made, . 


2 


Glove made, .... 


1 


Belts made, .... 


3 


Tables repaired, . 


1 


Harnesses repaired, 


51 


Drawer repaired, . 


1 


Baseballs sewed, . 


10 


Blanks printed, 


42,222 


Pillows made, 


301 


Weekly paper printed, copies, 


10,200 



48 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1900. 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, $2,500 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 1,250 00 

Treasurer, per year, 300 00 

Clerk, per year, 480 00 

Stenographer, per month, 25 00 

Steward and storekeeper, per month, 55 00 

Drag clerk, per month, 25 00 

Night attendants (men, 2), per month, .... $25 00-27 00 

Attendants (men, 8), per month, 18 00-30 00 

Night attendants (women, 2), per month, .... 16 00-18 00 

Attendants (women, 10), per month, 14 00-22 00 

Engineer, per year, 900 00 

Assistant engineer, per month, 50 00 

Helper, per month, 35 00 

Fireman, per month, 30 00 

Watchman, per month, 27 00 

Baker, per month, 30 00 

Cooks (4), per month, 20 00-25 00 

Assistant cooks (2), per month, 14 00-18 00 

Table girls (2), per month, 14 00-18 00 

Foreman industrial room, per month, 35 00 

Seamstress, per month, 25 00 

Assistant seamstress, per month, 18 00 

Laundress, per month, 25 00 

Laundry mau, per month, 18 00 

Assistant laundresses (2), per month, 14 00-17 00 

Farmer, per year, 700 00 

Assistant farmers (6), per month, 20 00-30 00 

Handy man, per month, 33 00 

Gardener, per month, 25 00 

Driver, per month, 30 00 

Carpenter, per day, 2 50 

Painter, per day, 1 76 

Mason, per day, 2 50 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 62, 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 



Year ending September 30, 1901. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1902. 



mi 
3 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



. ... No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS: to**** , 



Hospital for Epileptics ) u 



WUu>\ 



(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 



Year ending September 30, 1901, 




&w BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1902. 

\ 



JAN 31 1921 



STATE HOUI& BOtl 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, Boston. 

CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary Boston. 

ADELAIDE A. CALKINS, . . Springfield. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Boston. 

HENRY M. PHILLIPS, Springfield. 

HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., Lenox. 

WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D Dalton. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

EVERETT FLOOD, M.D Superintendent. 

ARTHUR O. MORTON, MD, I Assistant Physician and 

MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., > Pathologist. 

LILLIAN M. KINCAID, Clerk. 

MARY W. WENTWORTH, Stenographer. 

CHARLES F. SIMONDS, Steward and Storekeeper. 

GEORGE E. BATES, Engineer. 

J. W. WILLIAMS Farmer. 



TREASURER. 

CHARLES B. FISKE Palmer. 

Office at the Hospital. 



Commoitfomltjj of iiassatjjitsdts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics 
respectfully present the following report for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1901. 

To the great regret of the Board, Dr. Burnham R. Benner, 
who had been trustee since the creation of the institution, felt 
compelled, for personal reasons, to decline a renomination, his 
time having expired. Dr. Walter W. Scofield of Dalton was 
appoiuted in his place. 

The institution has gone on in a satisfactory manner during 
the past year. The new buildings which were in process of 
construction at the time of the last report have been essentially 
completed, and their furnishing is now well under way. These 
buildings are five in number, — an infirmary proper, a cottage 
for infirm males, a cottage for infirm females, a dining room 
building and a cottage for special female patients corresponding 
to the Hyde cottage for men. 

In April the contractor who was constructing these buildings 
failed, and his business was placed in the hands of an assignee. 
The hospital, however, was fully secured, and found it to its 
advantage to continue the work itself, which was done under 
agreement with the persons interested. 

In June, 1901, the hospital bought the Northrop estate of 
one hundred and twenty acres, which adjoined its property on 
the west, at a price of $3,500. This estate had been leased to 
us previously for two years, and it seemed advisable to secure 
it permanently. Belonging to it was an old farm house and 
sundry farm buildings, the latter of no special value. The 



6 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



farm house itself, an old wooden structure, serves for the pres- 
ent to accommodate about 20 male patients, who can do farm 
work on this part of the property. 

The appropriations granted the institution this year were : 
current expenses, $15,000 ; furnishing the new buildings, 
$20,000; laundry building and machinery, $9,500; purchase 
of Northrop estate, $3,500; painting, $1,000. 

The laundry building is now in process of erection. A site 
was chosen to the north of the employees' cottage and in the 
neighborhood of the power house, so that steam could be 
readily furnished, and it would not be in the way of the present 
buildings, while conveniently near them. The foundations 
have now been carefully laid, and the walls are being built. A 
considerable amount of excavation and of filling-in was neces- 
sary for this building, and this has been done almost entirely 
by inmates. 

In order to properly dry our new buildings and the lumber 
to be used in them it has been necessary to use an amount of 
coal much greater than that required for the ordinary heating 
of the buildings. This excess has been charged to extraordi- 
nary expenses, and does not enter into the ordinary current 
expense account. 

In such an institution as this there are always many needs. 
Among the most pressing, we may mention: (1) a nurses' 
home; (2) power plant; (3) proper accommodations for the 
farm employees and for those patients who do farm work. 

(1) The importance of a separate building for the nurses in 
an institution of this character should be apparent to any one 
who knows the conditions. It is not advisable that the ward 
attendants or nurses, whose duties when they are on service 
may be so arduous and responsible, should be required to sleep 
at night or by day in the same buildings with the patients, 
where they are constantly subjected to more or less unavoid- 
able disturbances, and where they cannot ever be really free ; 
where their rooms open into public wards, and privacy is only 
partial. We believe that the principle of erecting a separate 
building for nurses in such institutions as this is generally 
admitted and adopted. We can now partially provide for our 
nurses, but the time will soon come when a separate building 
will be required. 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



7 



(2) A power plant is badly needed. To furnish electricity 
for the new buildings, with our present plant, it will be 
necessary to cut down the number of lights in the old build- 
ings beyond what is convenient or wise. We also need 
power (motor) for the laundry, machine shop and industrial 
rooms. This is absolutely necessary to carry on our work 
properly. 

(3) We have now reached a stage in this hospital where 
the need of a group of farm buildings is apparent. At present 
the special requirements are : a building for the farm and the 
farm employees ; a building for those patients who are doing 
farm work. More space is also needed for our cows. We now 
have fifty head of stock, thirty milking cows ; and this number 
should be increased to furnish milk for the increased number 
of inmates which we shall receive when the new buildings are 
completed. 

The subject of overcrowding of patients is a most important 
one. This institution, which is only required by law to pro- 
vide for 200 inmates (patients), has at the present time 270. 
We believe that such overcrowding should never be permitted, 
and a stronger protest would be made, were it not that by the 
opening of the new buildings, which will occur very soon, we 
shall be fitted to properly accommodate those we have, and 
more. 

Care and Treatment of Patients. 

Experience has thoroughly proved to us that one of the most 
important factors in the health of the ordinary epileptic is 
occupation, or work. This is admitted to a very large extent 
even by the patients themselves. It is of course necessary that 
the amount and character of the work should be such as is 
suited to each individual ; one can do, say, fifty units ; another, 
a hundred ; while a third can not do more than ten. In the 
determination and arrangement of this consists a portion of the 
medical work. In the general treatment of the epileptic we 
find it best to use comparatively little medicine. Static elec- 
tricity as a composer and palliative is used to advantage. 

In addition to the actual physical benefit of work to the 
epileptic, we find a great benefit to many cases in the mental 
discipline entailed thereby, and in the mental training. The 
fact of being obliged to employ their minds to the extent 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



required in the work arouses and exercises their mental facul- 
ties, and also gives some of them, at least, greater powers of 
self-control. 

The Medical Profession. 

It has been unfortunate that for many years past the medical 
officers of the hospitals for the insane in this State and indeed 
all over the United States have gradually separated themselves 
and drifted away from the other members of the medical pro- 
fession. This has resulted in an almost total lack of interest in 
the one class in the work done by the other. Practically, how- 
ever, the medical work done in our hospital is an integral part 
of medical work as a whole, and as such should arouse the 
attention and interest of the whole profession. The trustees 
desire to obtain the sympathy and interest of the general medi- 
cal profession in this work, and to offer to them any proper 
facilities for the study and observation of such cases as are 
intrusted to their care. 

But it is not only the interest of the medical profession in 
our work which we wish to awaken. We desire, as far as may 
be, that all interested in the proper care of a seriously crippled 
class should feel that we are anxious and desirous to forward 
whatever is for the advantage and improvement of these per- 
sons, so far as we can. 



W. N. BULLARD, 

Chairman for the Board of Trustees. 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 
The following report is respectfully submitted : — 



Number of patients Sept. 30, 1900, 243 

Since admitted : — 

Sane (4 from visit), 65 

Insane, 29 

Discharged and on visit : — 

Sane. — Much improved, 3 

Improved, 19 

Not improved, 8 

Died 6 

On visit, 10 

46 

Insane. — Improved, 5 

Not improved, 3 

Died, 11 

On visit, ....... 2 

21 

Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1901, . . . 270 
Daily average of patients, . . . . . . 261.40 

Per capita cost (per week), ....... $4.49 



Summary of Year's Work. 

As touching some of the events of the year, I have sum- 
marized the work as follows : — 

Much clearing of brush from land on the hill has been done, 
mainly by patients. 

The repairing of the buildings inside and outside has been 
kept up, each workman having a few patients under his direc- 
tion. 

Putting piazzas on three buildings has been partly com- 
pleted by the hospital forces. 

Cutting openings into basements of buildings has been also 
attended to by the same means, very much to the advantage of 
the property. 



10 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



The wiring of the new buildings has been partly completed. 

Cutting over two hundred tons of hay and storing of three 
silos, with the usual farm work carried on without interruption. 

Sodding around the walks, taking sod from points where 
other walks are in prospect. 

A shelter for liquid manure cart now in process of construc- 
tion promises an advantage in fertilizer, and will also help to 
better house some of the farm tools. 

The routine of the medical work has been faithfully carried 
on by the efficient assistant physicians. 

Medical work on dietary has formed an appreciable item in 
this line. 

The work for shedding water on our steep hillsides has com- 
prised the digging of diagonal ditches and the roughest of the 
grading on the upper sides of the new buildings, merely to 
carry water away during the coming winter, and leaving an 
unlimited amount of work for the future. 

Much stone for roads has been broken, and some of it 
used. 

A good deal of teaming has been done by farm teams, in 
connection with the new buildings. 

An amount of lumber for a coal trestle has been taken from 
our new purchase, and the sawing and preparation of these 
heavy chestnut logs has been done by a portable mill, located 
on the farm. 

Two fountains have been built up in the court yards of the 
hospital buildings, and connected with a water supply from an 
otherwise unused reservoir. 

The extra work of caring for an excess of patients, keeping 
up the enthusiasm in work where there is great liability of this 
dropping off, and seeing that each person had comfortable and 
acceptable accommodations, have been matters of moment. 

The gardening has been carried on in about the same manner 
as last year. Setting out trees is being attended to from time 
to time. This fall the gardener is getting some small trees from 
the roadsides near us. During the spring a fair number of 
fruit trees were planted, and it is hoped that we can thus carry 
on this kind of work as means and time will allow. 

The vaccination of all the hospital residents has been at- 
tended to. 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 11 



The relaying of steam runs in tile in four places, varying 
from one hundred to two hundred feet in length, has been 
found a necessity, owing to the decay of the old plank conduits. 

Getting furnishings into the new buildings, including pur- 
chase of goods, furniture, beds, bedding, etc., has been a work 
of many months, requiring constant oversight and many trips 
to manufacturers. 

The making of shoes, boots, slippers, suits, etc., in the in- 
dustrial room, has now progressed so that nearly all of these 
goods are furnished from our own work rooms. 

Repairs of furniture and mending clothing has kept a good 
number of one class of workers steadily busy. 

The purchase of the farm on the hill has been completed, and 
now offers the most hopeful outlook for improvement and 
extension in many directions. 

Work. 

A great deal of effort has been put forth to get each patient 
to attempt regular daily work. We measure the result by the 
hours that such a patient has been making a willing effort to do 
some kind of manual labor, involving more or less mental con- 
centration, rather than by the amount of work accomplished. 
The former has been satisfactory in result, while the latter has 
not been great in quantity. There are many advantages to the 
patient if he persists in his effort to keep himself at the labor 
assigned. He is encouraged to persist, even if not feeling like 
it. Patients generally come here unaccustomed to working, 
and often have been taught that they are invalids, and will be 
harmed by work. The excuses given for not working are 
mainly sickness of one type or another. 

Schools. 

One school for the younger males and one for the younger 
females have given instruction to a daily average of 18 patients 
in elementary school work. This has comprised some work in 
arithmetic, geography, writing and spelling, history, reading, 
drawing on blackboards, etc. The results in this line have not 
been altogether encouraging, as many patients soon lose the 
facts learned, and require extra patience in repetition, and do 



12 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



not make the advance that can be seen in younger defectives. 
On the whole, however, the schools are of advantage, and will 
be continued with earnest endeavor. 



Records. 

A regular system is now in use for records, and this requires 
not only a careful physical examination of each patient and a 
psychological study of them from time to time, but daily 
entries, taking time and care for the observations and perma- 
nent preservation of the facts obtained. The home conditions 
vary so much with each patient that studies in heredity and 
psychology often involve a careful scrutiny of parents and of 
as much of the patient's home life as can be apprehended. 

Entertainments . 
The entertainments have been kept up, as shown in table, 
usually two a week, and Sunday services held every week. 
During the summer, excursions, car rides, etc., have been sub- 
stituted for some of the entertainments. 



Table showing Persons employed, and in what Way. 



Females. 



Grading, . 

Industrial building : — 
Chair seating, . 
Printing, . 
Tailoring, cutting, 
Tailoring, sewing, 
Cobbling, . 
Jobbing, 
Carving, 
Hair picking, 
Shoe sewing, 

Kitchens* . 
Laundry, . 
With yard man, 
Stone, 
Painting, . 
On roads, . 
Stable, 

Sewing room, . 
Ward work, 

Administration building, 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 13 



Table showing Persons employed, and in what Way — Concluded. 





Males. 


Females. 




1 

2 
1 


1 


Farm : — 

Such work as apple picking, barn, vegetable garden, 
clearing land, cutting brush, ditching, teaming, 
tending sheep, tending cows, milking, with gar- 


30 






122 


110 



Training School. 

The training school for nurses, established two years ago, 
has been continued during the past year. Last year a class of 
five was graduated, the members of which will remain at the 
hospital the coming year, filling various positions. One, after 
a post-graduate course in the Springfield city hospital, will take 
up the duties of superintendent of nurses, another has been 
appointed supervisor, and the three remaining will have charge 
of wards, as head nurses. There will be seven members in 
this year's graduating class. 

During the coming year it is proposed to enlarge the scope 
of the school's work to a considerable degree. Besides the 
regular instruction received from text books, lectures and ward 
work, special attention will be given to hydropathy, electricity 
and massage. Beginning with the next term, the class will 
occupy a spacious room, which has been specially fitted for 
this purpose in the new infirmary, where they will meet for 
recitations, demonstrations and lectures. 

Uniforms. 

The plan proposed last year, for a uniform suit for the wo- 
men nurses, was early carried out ; and now the men nurses 
are provided with a handsome suit, and cap of gray with the 
letters " M. H." in gold. The head female nurses are further 
distinguished by the color of band on their caps, and the super- 
visor and superintendent of nurses will adopt some suitable and 
not conspicuous insignia. 



14 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



List of Graduates, Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics Training 
School for Nurses, 1901. 



Bagley, Edith E. 
Cronin, Fannie C. 
Kilduff, Mary E. 



O'Brien, Julia A. 
McKeever, Emma S. M. 



Medical Lectures. 



DATE. 


Name. 


Subject. 


1900. 






Dec. 28, . 


Dr. L. H. Hendee, 


Scarlet-fever. 


1901. 






Jan. 22, . 


Dr. Albert C. Getchell, 


Treatment of pulmonary 
tuberculosis. 


Feb. 5, . 


Dr. Leslie C. Miller, . 


Toxemia. 


Feb. 15, . 


Dr. M. B. Hodskins, . 


Hydrotherapy. 


March 12, . 


Dr. L. H. Hendee, 


Anesthesia. 


March 26, . 


Dr. J. P. Schneider, . 


Points of observation. 


April 5, . 


Dr. A. O. Morton, 


Epilepsy. 



Methods of Admission and General Information. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
have been many times inquired about. They are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent ; in this case the approval of a judge is 
required in addition to the physician's certificate and the notifi- 
cation of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Every patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
They are not allowed to go to town alone, and are expected to 
live on plain diet and to go to bed early. These restrictions 
are not irksome when they are fully understood and complied 
with. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be required at home. 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the ad- 
dress for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London & 
Northern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River 
branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in 
Palmer, the other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from 
Boston, and the railroad fare is $1.90. 

Condition of Patients. 

One suicide has occurred during the year, and one former 
patient probably suicided at home, but a disposition to self- 
destruction is not common among epileptics. 

It is found to be more difficult to deal with epileptics than 
with the insane, and that in many ways our class of adult per- 
sons possess to a large degree the mental and emotional traits 
of children. A liability to homicide is always present, and 
many threats are made. In such cases the parties implicated 
are always talked with, and made to see the disadvantage in 
yielding to bad temper. The discipline derived from such per- 
sons as these living together, rather than where their weakness 
is not understood, is notable. 

The freedom allowed is necessary, but liable to be misused. 
In many cases to deny a certain amount of discretion about 
methods of living would be to throw the patient into a condi- 
tion of rebellion and possibly status or frenzy. 

The high mortality among epileptics as a rule is a fairly well- 
established fact, though our experience this year and last has 
not been much different from that of the insane hospitals. The 
liability to injury and carelessness of danger are matters re- 
quiring constant oversight. 

Some of the Plans for the Future. 
Our needs as they now present themselves are recorded 
below : need of asylum building ; need of nurses' home ; need 
of cold storage ; need of farm group ; need of power and light 



16 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



plant ; need of cottages ; need of more land ; need of colony 
group ; need of stable ; need of piggery, etc. ; need of coal 
trestle. 

Among all the apparent and urgent needs, it seems to me we 
must select the most evident, and the ones which are the most 
to aid in carrying on our important work. With this in mind, 
I have selected from the many three as most desirable ; they are 
the power and light plant, the nurses' home and the beginning 
of the farm group. Many other pressing needs are allowed to 
go over. 

The power and light plant recommended is designed to 
consist of a building located near our present boiler house, 
about forty by sixty feet, and one story high, built with a 
monitor roof, on the general plan of the laundry and boiler 
house. 

The nurses' home should be for the accommodation of not 
less than 35 or 40 women, so arranged as to allow each nurse 
to occupy a room by herself, and so placed that it may be near 
to their places of work, and yet retired enough for complete 
quiet. 

The farm group recommended should consist, when the time 
comes : (1) Of a house for the farmer and his men, and another 
for the patients and attendants working on the farm ; these two 
should house not less than 40 persons. (2) Of a cow barn 
and a good shelter near, to house a certain amount of hay and 
utensils. (3) Of a small building to house a boiler near 
the greenhouse. One of the old boilers now out of use will be 
adequate to the work required. 

The kind of buildings erected should be determined by care- 
ful consideration. I believe wooden buildings for the farm 
purposes indicated would be in every way satisfactory. 

Our policy as to the old barns and outhouses I consider 
should be to use them as long as it is found economy to do so, 
just as we have done with the old boilers. The time will come 
within a few years when all the oldest barns and outhouses 
may profitably be dispensed with, and what lumber there is 
left in them used on the construction of others. The present 
year ought to see the dismantling of two or more of these 
oldest structures. 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 17 



Use of Appropriations. 
The description of the new buildings, as given in the trus- 
tees' report of last year and this, is so accurate and complete 
that no further account seems necessary. The buildings have 
been completed as described, and are now nearly ready for 
occupancy. The manner in which the other appropriations 
have been used is also sufficiently clear without further expla- 
nation. 

Contractor delayed. 

The delay in the completion of the buildings has been caused 
by the assignment of the contractor. This failure on his part 
has not been in any way due to his contract here, but to un- 
favorable conditions connected with his other contracts ; but 
the fact has, nevertheless, thrown considerable extra work on 
the home forces. This has been, however, very satisfactorily 
attended to, without serious loss. 

Classification will be much improved by the increased space, 
and with the addition of the nurses' home, farm group and other 
cottages will be fairly satisfactory. 

Extraordinary Expense. 

The expense of coal during the year, which has been classed 
as an extraordinary outlay, needs some explanation, and will, 
of course, ultimately be figured in with the cost of plant. 

We have heated five buildings more than a year, while they 
were unoccupied. Almost as much steam has been necessary 
during the summer as during the winter, in order that all 
lumber and partly finished parts should be properly protected. 
There is also a certain amount of coal, for the continuation 
into another year of this same service, now on hand. This, all 
summed up, makes a large item, and it seems to me proper, 
with the concurrence of your Board, that the outlay should be 
classed as an extraordinary one. 

Medical Staff. 
No changes have occurred during the year either in the 
medical staff or in the office force, — a condition which is espe- 
cially gratifying. The present workers in those several lines 
are competent, and eminently satisfactory in all ways. 



18 



HOSPITAL FOK EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



The regular study hours of the doctors will be continued, 
during which examinations of cases will be made, observations 
compared and diagnoses confirmed. 

Amusements. 



Form of Amusement. 



1900. 

Oct. 10, 
24, 
29, 
2, 
7, 
10, 
12, 
18, 



Nov. 



Dec. 



28, 
14, 
19, 

20, 
25, 



1901. 

Jan. 1, 
8, 

14, 
18, 
24, 
30, 

Feb. 7, 
12, 
21, 

28, 

March 4, 

7, 
15, 
18, 
21, 
29, 

April 3, 

4, 
10, 

16, 

23, 

26, 



F. G. Reynolds, 

Walter Eccles, 

Arthur E. Fitch, 

F. G. Reynolds, 

F. O. Munger (pianist), 

F. O. M., . 

John F. Kyes, . 

Ada M. Crow, . 

Nelson's Orchestra, 
F. O. M., . 
F. O. M., . 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Lawrence 
F. O. M., . 



F. O. M., . 
Ada M. Crow, . 

Rev. F. S. Hatch, . 
F. O. M., . 
F. O. M, . 

F. O. M 

F. O. M 

F. O. M 

F. O. M., . 
F. O. M., . 
Class 1901, Palmer high 

school, . 
F. O. M., . 

Employees and patients 

F. O. M., . 

Harry Bryant, . 

A. A. Moulton (violinist) 

Jennie Bray (pianist) , 

A. A. M., . 

J. B., 

F. G. Reynolds, 
A. A. M, . 

J. B 

A. A. M 

J. B 



Ada M. Crow, 

A. A. M., . 
J. B., 



Readings and impersonations. 
Readings and impersonations. 
Lecture (characteristics) . 
Readings and impersonations. 
Dance. 
Dance. 

Sketching and lecture (Holland). 
Illustrated lecture (Paris Exposi- 
tion) . 
Masquerade ball. 
Dance. 
Dance. 

Readings and impersonations. 
Dance. 



Dance. 

Illustrated lecture (Rocky Moun- 
tains). 
Lecture (India). 
Dance. 
Dance. 
Dance. 
Dance. 
Dance. 
Dance. 
Dance, 

Play. 
Dance. 
Whist party. 
Dance. 

Ventriloquist. 
Dance. 

Dance. 

Readings and impersonations. 
Dance. 



Dance. 

Illustrated 
Play). 

Dance. 



lecture (the Passion 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 19 



Amusements — Concluded. 



DATE. 


Name. 


Form of Amusement. 


1901. 






May 1, 


A. A. M 

J. B., 


> Dance. 


8, 


A. A. M., . 


> Dance. 


J. B., 


16, 


F. G. Reynolds, 


Readings and impersonations. 


22, 


A. A. M, .... 

T R 

o . r>., .... 


> Dance. 
> 


30, 


A. A. M., . 
J. B., 


^ Dance. 


June 4, 


A. A. M., . 
J. B., 


^ Dance. 


10, 


C. R.Taggart,. 


Readings and impersonations. 


13, 


A. A. M., .... 
J. B., 


| Dance. 


Sept 16, 


F. G. Reynolds, 


Readings and impersonations. 



Picnics, etc. 



Number. 



Place. 



13 patients, 

1 patient, 

6 patients, 

2 patients, 

3 patients, 

3 patients, 

4 patients, 
2 patients, 

22 patients, 
13 patients, 
100 patients, 
1 patient, 
1 patient, 
22 patients, 
18 patients, 

5 patients, 
8 patients, 

1 patient, 

2 patients, 
4 patients, 

2 patients, 

3 patients, 

4 patients, 

7 patients, 
61 patients, 
43 patients, 
78 patients, 



Picnic dinner, hospital grounds. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Picnic dinner, hospital grounds. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

For electric car ride. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

For electric car ride. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

For electric car ride. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Forest Lake, Palmer, Mass. 

Eastern Hampden County Fair, Palmer, Mass. 

Eastern Hampden County Fair, Palmer, Mass. 

Eastern Hampden County Fair, Palmer, Mass. 



20 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Acknowledgment is made of the following donations : — 

Gifts. 



NAME. 



Residence. 



Gift. 



Mrs. C. A. Brown, . 
Mrs. A. H. Hitchcock, . 
Rev. Fr. W. H. Hart, 

C.L.Bent, 

Business and Sociai Club, 

Mr. Thaddeus Cushman, . 
Mrs. Wm. S. Hyde, . 
Mrs. W. D. Clark, . 
The Cheer Up Society, . 
8. Bent and Bro., 



Palmer, 
Palmer, 
Palmer, 

Gardner, 
Palmer, 

Monson, 
Ware, 
Palmer, 
Palmer, 
South Gardner, 



Books, magazines and papers. 

" Ladies' Home Journal " and magazines. 

One year's numbers of "North American Re- 
view," " Review of Reviews," " Home Com- 
panion," 11 Literary Digest," and miscellaneous 
papers, etc. 

" Harper's Weekly," " Frank Leslie's " and 
games. 

One year's numbers of " Review of Reviews," 
" Munsey's Magazine," " McClure's Magazine " 
and "Scribner's Magazine." 

"Harper's Weekly," "The Bookman," "Mun- 
sey's Magazine " and " Scribner's." 

Three volumes " Harper's Monthly Magazine." 

Magazines and papers. 

" Youth's Companion " and magazines. 

Eleven chairs and one settee. 



EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 21 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

I respectfully submit herewith the following report of the 
finances of this hospital for the year ending Sept. 30, 1901 : — 



Assets. 

Real estate : — 

Cultivated land (acres) 113, . . . $17,31100 

Woodland (acres) 21 1,465 00 

Pasturage (acres) 92, .... 4,237 00 
Farm (under appropriation 1901) (acres) 

120 3,000 00 

Water and sewerage systems, . . . 30,200 00 

Additions to water and sewerage systems, 3,013 00 

Quarry, 450 00 

Buildings : — 

Original buildings, $37,770 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1895), . 84,000 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . 85,000 00 

Greenhouse, 1,100 00 

Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), 4,600 00 

Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), 500 00 

Personal estate : — 



Live stock on the farm, .... 


f4,974 


00 


Produce of the farm on hand, . 


6,422 


95 


Carriages and agricultural implements, . 


3,051 


20 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 


31,104 


35 


Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 


6,102 


38 


Other furniture in inmates 1 department, . 


6,580 


79 


Personal property of State in administra- 






tion building and employees' cottage, . 


7,113 


03 


Ready-made clothing, .... 


945 


50 


Dry goods, 


1,826 


79 


Provisions and groceries, .... 


1,845 


73 


Drugs and medicines, .... 


1,681 


84 




7,132 


50 




600 


00 


Other supplies undistributed, . 


6,617 


80 



$59,676 00 



212,970 00 



85,998 86 



$358,644 86 



22 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



$7,964 36 

$2,854 74 
44,942 43 
82 41 
13,641 76 

1,855 32 

2,406 57 
106 00 

3,500 00 

8,712 37 
12,080 04 



Total from appropriations, 90,181 64 

Received from State for board of patients, . $11,972 52 
Received from towns for board of patients, . 28,150 92 
Received from individuals for board of pa- 
tients, 2,994 38 

Received from farm and farm products, . . 1,054 49 

Received from sale of barrels, junk, etc., . 104 65 

Received from store, 287 78 

Received from interest, 211 21 

Received from sundries, 136 83 

Received from patients for safe keeping, . 408 72 

45,321 50 

Total receipts, f 143,467 50 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, wages and labor, $27,916 81 

Provisions and supplies : — 

Meat, ' $2,864 34 

Fish, 478 52 

Fruit and vegetables, .... 874 65 

Flour, 569 25 

Grain and meal for table, .... 403 80 

Hay, grain and meal for stock,. . . 2,011 62 
Tea, coffee and chocolate, .... 381 41 

Sugar, syrup and molasses, . . . 1,465 12 
Milk, butter and cheese, .... 2,353 89 
Salt and other groceries, .... 949 42 

All other provisions, 1,590 34 

13,942 36 

Clothing 2,032 56 

Fuel, 5,159 06 

Water 611 64 



Amount carried forward, $49,662 43 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1900, . 
Received from State appropriations : — 

Cottage for patients, 1899, 

Infirmary building, 1899, . 

Equipping workroom, 1899, 

Boiler plant, 1900, 

Laundry building and machinery, 1901, . 

Furnishing new buildings, 1901, 

Painting, 1901 

Farm and buildings, 1901, . . . . 

For current expenses, 1900, 

For current expenses, 1901, 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



23 



Amount brought forward, $49,662 43 

Medicine and medical supplies, 1,400 77 

Furniture, beds and bedding, 988 89 

Transportation, 718 07 

Expenses of trustees and superintendent, .... 522 59 

Ordinary repairs, 2,155 17 

All other current expenses, 5,827 14 



Total current expenses, $61,275 06 

Other extraordinary expenses, 75,889 23 

Paid to patients, 309 36 

Total expenditures, $137,473 65 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1901, 5,993 85 



$143,467 50 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, . . .... $5,993 85 

Bills receivable for board, .... 12,414 35 

Other bills receivable, 54 58 

Unexpended appropriations available, . . 39,548 44 

$58,011 22 

Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, $2,514 37 

Miscellaneous bills, 2,290 23 

Construction bills, etc., 3,282 67 

Money belonging to patients, .... 352 83 

8,440 10 



$49,571 12 

Dividing the total current expenditures ($61,275.06) by the 
average number of patients (261.40) shows an annual cost 
per patient of $234 41-f- 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of ... 4 49-f- 



24 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1901. 



Statement of Appropriations. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 


Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
this Year. 


Balance 
Available. 




$10,000 


00 


$6,076 40 


$2,854 74 


$1,068 86 




75,000 


00 


21,183 69 


44,942 43 


8,873 88 


Equipping workroom, 


500 


00 


417 59 


82 41 




Current expenses, 1900, 


15,000 


00 


6,287 63 


8,712 37 






25,000 


00 


10,804 61 


13,641 76 


553 63 


Current expenses, 1901, 


15,000 


00 




12,080 04 


2,919 96 


Laundry building and machinery, . 


9,500 


00 




1,855 32 


7,644 68 


Furnishing new buildings, . 


20,000 


00 




2,406 57 


17,593 43 


Farm and buildings 


3,500 


00 




3,500 00 






1,000 


00 




106 00 


894 00 




$174,500 


00 


$44,769 92 


$90,181 64 


$39,548 44 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 

The undersigned hereby certifies that he has compared the amount received for board 
and care of patients for the year ending Sept. 30, 1901 ($43,117.82), with the estimated 
earnings of the hospital for the year, and finds them to agree. He finds vouchers on file 
at the hospital for disbursements for current expenses to the amount of $67,775.06. The 
footings of the cash book have been verified, and show a balance in the hands of the 
treasurer on Sept. 30, 1901, of $5,993.85, as follows : — 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $4,454 90 

Cash vouchers, payments not entered, 1,400 84 

Cash in safe at hospital 138 11 

$5,993 85 



GEO. L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



w 

g 

OB 

a 

I 





Totals. 


HH^«5OWO00«0OOO<0^-* 
© t© tOCO rH rH CM CO r~ rH CO 
1— I i— 1 rH tH 


OS AO N C5 (N 
uO CO c© © OS 

© rH c© CM 




00 


H50<MC5COH05!ONeO^^(NiOCO 




S 




IO CM t~ rH OHtJI o. 




5 


"3 






•< 


a 




CO CO ^t 1 


CO 


u 




K5HW 




fa 








Males. 


OONNNNOiO^NC5»Tl<OitO 
»0 CO O0H rH iO rH CO 00 


lO CO TtH 00 



WO^NQOCO^HNtNOOW^Tt* 
OS CO CO (NHHHN^OOHW 
CM CO CM rH CO 



rH rH -rji >0 
CM rH 



N(NO^00 
CO lO l> tO rH 



i0(N(N05H(N(N^05C0^OHON r-OONOOM 
HlO CO CM rH CO CO OS rH CO 00000500 



CM OS 
CM 



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t>- rH iQTfO t> 



OS CM O CO OS 
IMt^HiOO 

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iC ^ © 



CM | OlH( ICOrHCOrHOOtOOCMOS CM O. CO 05 
rH GO t>- CM iO 00 rH OS OS CM 



HtJH»OH 
00 CM iO 



CM TfH 
OO 



INNOHCMtCNHH t^CO-rfl^iO 
t>HiO 00 HNCOiOCC 




28 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



C$5 

e 
e 



I 

(SI 







•SIBJOX 




lO *~J" tH CO T 1 | £\j 


CO 
CO 


CO 1 




fOTALS 


'S9IBIII9j[ 


03 GN i— I 


CO CM i— i CM CM CM 1 1 I 




t>» | 






•S9IVK 


«-> I CM CM 


CM CM 1 i— i CM CM tJ< i— l CM 


CM 


1 


CD 
H 








lO i~ ' CM CO CO CO 


CO 


O 1 
CO 


3CHARC 


SANK. 




CM r-t | 


CO CM i— 1 CM i— 1 i— I 1 I I 


CO 
1— I 


CO 1 


Pt 




"S9JBJV[ 


H (N H 


CM CM I I CM CM CO t-i i— ( 


o. 


t» 1 








1 i—l CM 




QO 


00 1 




NSANE 


"891BIH9 




| | | 1 1— 1 f-H | | | 




"tfl 1 






*S9JBJ^[ 


1 1 »— 1 


> 1 1 1 [ — ' — 




1 










CO *— ' CO t>* 00 


<^> 
OS 


CO 1 

00 




TOTALS 


•89JBCCI9 > J 


CM t— ( »0 


t-'^T^CM'— ICOCO-H/ICM 


CO 
CO 


1 

CO 




*S91BJ\[ 


CO ^ 


(n. 05 CO CO CO 


CM 
iO 


o 1 


03 
55 




•8IBJ0X 


cq 


C75 iO *o ^ co co to ^ 


CD 


C5 I 


MISSIO 


SANE. 


'S91BUI9 j[ 


HHTj< 


CO H CO I i-H CO CM CO i— • 


CO 
CM 


>o 1 

CM 


a 
< 




'89^BJV 


CO CM i— < 


COCOCM»OCOCO-^COCO 


CO 


1 

CO 








i— ( CM -+< 


CM "^f CO CO | I i-H CM ' 


C7i 
CM 


C5 1 

CM 




NSANE 


•S9IBra9J 


H I i-l 


H CO i-i CM 1 I HHH 




CM I 






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1 CM CO 


HHIQ^ 1 1 1 — H | 




t— 1 



C t>- 

a o a> 

0£Q 



o 

l-j fen g <J g t-2 «< QQ 



^ 



1901.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



29 









55 


^OQOOCOOCONN 


o 








CO GO CO 


CO O *0 *0 CO '^f CM CO t— i 










— * — (3 


CO CO CM OS CM 1—1 CO "H* 


1 1 








^ 




co 








CM CM CM 


CMGMCMGMCMGMGMGMCM 


CM 








t>- O j^Ji 


CO t>- t>» O O CO t— < CM O 


CM 










CO 0> OS t>- t>» C^- CM 


1 1 ^ 




H 




CO CO CO 


, + N?OOON'Ot>C < l<M 






O 




<N(N(N 


COCOCOCOCOCOCO-^'H/i 


3 




H 




H rH rH 


t— It-It— It- It-It— It— It— It— 1 










CS ^ CO 


COCOt— IOCOt>-CM'Ct>» 


CO 








T-H CO T— 1 




CO 






•S8iuj\[ 




OCMiOO-^uOOCM — 


1 1 . 

uo 










T-CMCMCOCOCOCOCOCO 


2 


s 






1— 1 T-H T-l 


T-H ,-( ,— 1 ,— I 1— 't— It— 1 r— 1 .— 1 




iTl 
H 






t>- CO CM 


O t— ' O t$H O ""f t^- Oi 


CO 


a 






CO CM T-l 


0<-iOC<)XI>C>NO 


1 1 ^ 








(N CN N 




1 1 © 


55 






O O C5 


0>— iOt— 1 t-H i-H i-< iCMGM 




<n 












|J 
W 






CM CO CO 


COOONCOONiOCO 


CO 


H 


g 




»o t>- CO 


coooococococo'^ 








1 1 2 


Oh 


CO 




t>- t>. co 


TfliOTjuocOlNiCOO 




h 

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■^f '•H* 


>o »o >c »o iO »o >o O CO 




© 






iOOO> 


(N r-i CO H O (N N CO 


»o 


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CO iO CM 


COth©hiOh©hCN 




— 








1 1 • 










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10 *o »o 


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co o> os <o os co t^- 


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, 1 5 


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T-l CM CO 


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1 1 o 








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a 


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OS 










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OS 




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1 1 








o o ai 


OCMCMCO-*COGMCMt-i 










COQDt> 


QOCOCOCOQOQOCOCOCO 


CO 








"# t*h 


Tji(3>ONiCMNOCO'* 


CO 








CO CO CO 














. 1 ^ 








O T-l CO 


CONO(NCOCOt^ — © 


CO 








CO CO CO 


cocot»c^t>-t>.t>-t^t>. 


CO 



cOt-it-it-icnicocmgm 



| | T-l CO H | 



T— I | H I T-l T-l | | 



T— I | T-H | | 



I I I I HH I I 



•8IBJ0X 



CM rH I T-i t-h CM CM CM 



»-H t-H i 



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CM I I I I CM t-h I 



1 £ 8 



|||| £l£B>| 



=3 © 



«fH «fH > 

O O & 
n *2 >> 



£ 05 « £}<o3 3 3 s 



30 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. ' [Oct. 



3. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


< 

INSANE. 


2ASK8 ADMITTED 
SANE. 


TOTALS. 
























CO 






00 






GO 






Males. 


Fcraah 


Totals. 


Males. 


Femah 


Totals. 


Males. 


FemaU 


Totals. 




16 


11 


27 


34 


23 


57 


50 


34 


84 




1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


2 


4 


6 




17 


12 


29 


35 


26 


61 


52 


38 


90 




17 


12 


29 


34 


25 


59 


51 


37 


88 



4. — Relations to Hospitals of Cases admitted. 





IVSANB. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


HOSPITAL RELATIONS.. 




CO 






OB 






80 






CO 


o 

"3 






3 


go 


GO 


V 

"5 






"5 


1 

CD 

fa 


2 

o 

Eh 


"3 
S 


S 

Ctf 

fa 


o 
Eh 


CD 

*3 

a 


a 

o 

fa 


O 
H 


Inmates of this hospital only, 


6 


5 


11 


34 


22 


56 


40 


27 


67 


Former inmates of this hospital only, . 




1 


1 


1 


3 


4 


1 


4 


5 


Former inmates of other hospitals : — 




















Boston Insane Hospital, .... 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Hospital Cottages for Children, 


6 




6 








6 




6 


Hospital Cottages for Children and State 




3 


3 










3 


3 


Hospital. 




















Hospital Cottages for Children and Taun- 




1 


1 










1 


1 


ton Insane Hospital. 




















Hospital for Insane Criminals, 






1 








1 




1 


School for the Feeble-minded, 






1 








1 




1 






1 


2 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 






1 


2 








1 


1 


2 




17 


12 


29 


35 


26 


61 


52 


38 


90 


Total of persons, .... 


17 


12 


29 


34 


25 


59 


51 


37 


88 



1901.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 







X 


•sjaqioj^ 


04 








00 






< 












X 






? 




o 

«a 


t ih co i coo 


1 04 1 


O i-H 04 r-c 04 1 f- 04 


00 
00 




00 


x 


•sjaqioj^ 








^- 71 — — — — *j — ICO 


CO 




o 


< 
s 


•saaqiBjj 








— — — 'C — 71— 1 DQ 


CO 






_ 




O 


1 1 04 1 04 1-1 


1 04 1 


CO — — i-i 04 h 1 1 1 n 


r~ 

CO 








•eaaqioj^ 


o 


i 04 I 




CO i-H 1 04 04 1 04 1 ! CO 


3 






X 
< 


•Bjaqjs^ 








04 1 1 CO 00 1 SO 1 1 iC5 


3 






a 


' tn naTip x 


o 

CO 


1 pH iH 1 iH — 


1 1 1 


t- 1 1 i-l 04 1 04 1 w* |H 


3 






X 


•ej3qioj\ 










8 






- 






















CO 


1 HN 1 SO ^ 




t- r- i-l 04 04 i-H rH 1 i— i-l 


i-O 


mitt 




j -KU'IVW 


•saaqioj^ 












uO 
0} 


i ad, 


Sank 


•sjaqiB^j 




I _ | — 


1 <— l 1 




o5 


ions 








1 1 H | flH 


1 1-H | 




l0 
04 








•8i8qioj£ 








— — 1 c-i c i — i C4 


-, 

CO 


c 




X 
< 


•sjaqiBj 










CO 


w 
c 








oc 








co 


e 




x! 


•8J3qjOJ^ 








CO 1 1 1 CO 1 04 1 1 O 


04 


Pa) 




< 




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8 






■BiuaiiBj 


a 






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04 


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tivi 


< 

on 


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1 1 04 1 i-H | 




CO 1 IHN IH 1 1 t* 












04 











c - o 



□ os or: 

CJ - 



~ - - o si 



-^^ 2 = 5 o *. 



32 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 



COUNTIES. 


Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


00 

1 
5 
h 


Totals. 


Barnstable, .... 


i 
l 




1 
1 








i 
i 




1 
1 


Berkshire, .... 




- 




- 


1 


1 




1 


1 


Bristol, 








4 


2 


6 


4 


2 


6 


Essex, 








1 


4 


5 


1 


4 


5 


Hampden, .... 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


Hampshire, .... 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 


Middlesex, .... 


4 


3 


7 


9 


3 


12 


13 


6 


19 


Norfolk, 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 


4 


2 


6 


Plymouth, .... 




1 


1 




2 


2 




3 


3 


Suffolk, 


4 


4 


8 


11 


8 


19 


15 


12 


27 


Worcester, .... 


5 


3 


8 


4 


2 


6 


9 


5 


14 


Totals, .... 


17 


12 


29 


34 


25 


59 


51 


37 


88 



1901.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



33 









C<1 


0) 

IS 


o> 
d 


00 

3 
-< 
H 


•ani'm-i t 






■M 


(M 










t- 


Q 






1 1 


i 

o 

o 
> 






1 1 






1 1 


t 1 


n 










IDOWK 














1 1 


P 




CO 1 


CO 


eo 


s 

5 
b; 

•< 


•831^1119^: 


<M 1 




<M 












Q 
63 




co 




>o 

(M 


cm 


MAUHI 






o» 


OS 










to 


CO 



~ o o 



— o 

— X 



00 

O 

H CM I H 



co 


00 

CO CO 


© «* 








1 1 


1 1 


l~t 1 




CO 1 


CO CO 


eo 1 


CO CO 


1 1 


1 1 


CS) I 


cm 


•«# 1 




00 1 


00 00 


CO SO 
SO 


CM 




s ° 




CO Cg 



- a 

2. o 

— » 



o o 
Eh Eh 



5 e. 
o o 



« § Eh Eh 



fe CD 



34 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

8. — Occupations of Persons admitted. 

MALES. 





Insane. 


c 

ej 

m 


Totals. 




Insane. 


s 

02 


Totals. 


Carpenter, . 


- 


1 


1 


Furniture finisher, . 


- 


1 


1 


Clerks, 




3 


o 
6 


Moulder, . 




1 


i 
1 


Druggist, . 




1 


1 


Physician, 




1 


1 


Errand boys, 




2 


2 


Teamster, 




1 


1 


Farmers, . 




3 


3 


Weavers, . 




3 


3 


Foundry, . 




1 


1 


Unknown, 


17 


14 


31 


Gilder, 




1 


1 


Totals, 


17 


34 


51 


Grocery delivery, 




1 


1 











FEMALES. 



Domestics, . 


3 


6 


9 


Teacher, . 




1 


1 


Housewife, 


1 




1 


Unknown, 


7 


17 


24 


Mill operatives, . 


1 




1 


Totals, 


12 


25 


37 


Student, 




1 


1 










DAUGHTER OR WIFE OF — 


Butcher, 




1 


1 


Manufacturer, . 




1 


1 


Brush maker, . 




1 


1 


Mason, 


1 




1 


Coopers, 




2 


2 


Mill operative, 




1 


1 


Gas works employee, 




1 


1 


Sailor, 


1 




1 


Farmers, . 


1 


7 


8 


Weavers, . 




2 


2 


Laborers, . 




6 


6 


Totals, 


15 


48 


63 


Machinist, . 




1 


1 











1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 35 



9. — Probable Causes of Disease in Persons admitted.* 





Insane. 


Sank. 


Totals. 




I? 6H1&16S. 




Males. 




Totals. 


Alcoholism, 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


2 


Anger, 


— 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


1 


Blow over stomach, . 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


i 
1 


Cerebral hemorrhage, 


1 


1 


2 


1 


- 


1 


o 

o 


Fright, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


3 


Grief, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Heredity, . 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


4 


7 


Injury to head, . 


- 


2 


2 


5 


2 


7 


9 


Masturbation, 


- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


2 


n 

3 


Meningitis, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Menstruation, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


3 


Overwork, . 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


1 


Puberty, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


i 
1 


Scarlatina, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


3 


Stomach trouble, 








1 


1 


2 


2 


Sunstroke, . 




1 


1 


4 




4 


c 



Syphilis, 


1 




1 








1 


Teething, . 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


Typhoid fever, . 








1 




1 


1 


Unknown, . 


13 


2 


15 


13 


10 


23 


38 


Totals, . 


17 


12 


29 


34 


25 


59 


88 



* Assigned causes. 



36 



HOSPITAL FOB, EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



8 

i 





■ 
























co 


CM 


CO 


CO 


I co 




© 


CO 










CO 
























■ 
















Ed 

S5 


ale 


CO 


CM 


CO 


1 




o 


1 CO 


•< 


a 


CM 










CM 




00 


o 


















n 




















iO 


tr- 


CO 


CM 


*o 


qo 


1 lO 




"3 


CO 
















S 




































3 


o> 


ee 




CM 




CM 


1 CM 




o 


CM 










CM 
























■ 
















a 


S 


















"3 


CM 


i— i 




1 


1 


o 


1 1 


< 

CO 


a 
















55 


e 




































■ 




















l> 


CM 


1 


CM 


1— 1 


CM 


1 CM 






T-H 










i—i 























rs 

SP 

O 



'53 



fc C s 2 



1901.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 





ATH. 


Totals. 


1 CM CM CO »— • I 1 CM I i—i I I 






24.54 




IME OF DE 


Females. 


| | 1— 1 CO | ( | T— 1 | 1— I | | 


?© 


?o 


32.5 


S DIED. 


H 
< 


Males. 


| CMrH 1 rH | 1 iH I 1 I I 






i—( 

CM 


Person 


M 
o 


Totals. 


1 CO CM 1 1 1 1 1 ? 1 


1 iH 




T— 1 


*o 

OS 




FIRST ATTA 


Females. 


1 CO CM I 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 iH 






11.5 




H 
< 


Males. 


1 «s I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 


10 


»o 






ft 

a 


Totals. 


1 iCOH^CN^CfJH | | { 

■ 


Oi 
<M 


CM 


25.25 




EN ADMITT 


Females. 


1 CM CO I (NfHCOH 1 1 | | 


CM 
i-H 


CM 


25.41 


ADMITTED. 


S 


Males. 








24.70 


Persons . 


9 


Totals. 


NCftWH I H I H | | 
i—l 


1 CM 


CM 


CM 


10.92 




FIRST ATTA 


Females. 


NQOH | | H I I | I I 1 


CM 


(M 






H 

■4 


Males. 


1 t— i CM i— 1 1 1 1 i-t 1 1 
i—( 


1 CM 




i— ( 


12.33 



" ,2 o *o o »o o o o o o 6 ft o> 

^. CM GN CO CO O ?0 CO ^ ^ 5u 

_Tcooooooooo c ° 03 

.ti a i»OOiOO'00000>: * 03 

C ^rHWCNCOCO^nOCON E> o 03 

O 03 O r~ r~ «^ 

bijo S S3 tr-i tr-i i«=s 

S2£ £ 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 





A.TH. 


Totals. 


I | rH rH CM 1 rH | I H | I 




eo 


CS 

CM 
CO 




» 
O 

o 

1 


Females. 


1 1 1 rH | | | | | rH | | 


CM 


CM 


43.75 


a 

ti 
Q 


H 


Males. 


1 1 rH | CM 1 rH | 1 1 1 1 






27.5 


S5 
O 

00 

* 

Oh 


M 

o 


Totals. 


1 CM CN rH | | | 1 rH 1 | I 


eo 


eo 


21.25 




FIRST ATTJI 


Females. 


1 1 r-t | | | | | rH | | | 


CM 


CM 


36.25 




E-< 
<< 


Males. 


1 «H tH | | | | | | | | 










Q 

a 


to 

3 

o 


i-H rH 


eo 


cs 
>c 


27.21 




EN ADMITT 


Females. 


1 HtDOHH I iKNH I | 


eo 
CM 


•O 
CM 


28.94 


Persons admitted. 


WH 


Males. 




iO 
CO 


CO 


25.92 


M 
o 


Totals. 


CM -+ 1 CM 1 COH | I H 
CO 


eo 


OS 


15.52 




FIRST ATTA 


Females. 


! CO CM rH CM 1 1 CM rH | | | 
rH 


eo 
CM 


CM 


cs 
o 

«o 




H 
-< 


Males. 


CM O iO O CM CM 1 rH | | | H 


CO 


CO 


15.85 


AGES. 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, .... 
From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years, 

70 to 80 years, 
Unknown, 


Total of cases, .... 


Total of persons, 


Mean ages, .... 



t 

1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No." 62. 



39 



< 



1 (NMTf JJ | H(N 1 IN 1 1 


£h ^ OS 

CO 
CO 


1 Ir-.^| I |H |(N I 1 


QO 00 iH 

CO 

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1 N(N 1 CO 1 HH | | | | 


as ci co 

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CO 
CO 


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t>- co 


1 CO CO 1 I 1 I 1 — < 1 1 i — 1 


oo co o 

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1 NHrt | | 1 | | | 1 | 


o cs 

CO 

o 


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CO 
CO 


I MOJO WINOOtQlNH | | 

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co co o 

CO 
CO 


1 CO -+ 30 O) >C CC' O (M 1 1 | 


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$3 


-4-> 




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To 


To 








a 













•3 -3 s 



40 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Totals. 


TOTALS. 


•epnox 


CM | li-IIMCM^JJHjJiftOOeM 


CO 

© CO 

OS 00 rn 




1 CO 

rH 1 | l | •— ^ O CO O rH I OO t — CO 
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ALL OTHER 

AD- 
MISSIONS. 


•eiB.ox 


i CO 

rH 1 | | ir-it*-»H<aoeoeN COco r- 

r N 2 


"BSJBtOO^ 


rH | | | 1 .HrHCMCOCMrHlrHrH ^ 




1 1 1 1 1 1 CO CM i-H i-H j CM CM CO 


FIRST 
ADMISSION 

TO ANT 
HOSPITAL. 


•SIBJOJ, 


1 OO 

i-H | I — M r- — o t- tO lit— »fS CO 
r- i-H CM rH CO CO ^ 




1 CO 

1 1 1 1 1 ICOCOCOCO 1 1 t— CD OS 
i-h 1 CM CM ^« 


•B91B^ 


i-h i i rH cm r-i t~ t- ^ t- tjoes cm 

I-H -* CO ^ 


Sane. 


DO 
r] 

< 
Eh 

o 

tX 


•S[B}OJ, 


1 -? 

rH 1 1 rH CM CM OS O CO i— II— OS CO 
CM i-H CO lO 

co 




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1 1 1 1 1 l-H <M <M t~ 1 1 iO t— 

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ALL OTHER 

AD- 
MISSIONS. 


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© 


'BSJBCCOjJ 


1 1 1 1 1 rH | rH rH rH 1 i "* H< L- 




1 1 . . , 1 , , 1 1 |»H rH ^ 


FIRST 
ADMISSION 

TO ANT 
HOSPITAL. 


SIBJOJ, 


rH 1 1 i-H CM rH 00 00 lO © IICOHJl CO 
CM rH irt O 

CO 


•sajBixiajj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CN CO — CO 1 j <M rH ^ 

rH 1 <M CM ^ 




i as 

rH 1 IrHCMrHCOtOHjiHji 1 j jt CO t~ 


Insane. 


ED 
rl 

O 
Eh 


•BIBJOJ, 


i CO 

rH i i i i i in io a> t- cm i a. a. oo 

CO 




1 CM 

I-H | | | | ICMrHTjlCOrH CMCM 00 

j 1-1 00 


•B9[BK 


1 CM 

1 1 1 1 1 1 CO HJ< O -* H j t- t— CO 

1-1 1-1 CO 


ALL OTHER 

AD- 
MISSIONS. 


•BJBJOX 


rH | | | | 1 CO CO CM -M 1 OO CO 00 

1-1 CM 


•sajBaia^ 




•safBH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CM CM O rH rn 1 rH rH ^ 


FIRST 
ADMISSION 

TO ANT 
HOSPITAL. 


•bibioj, 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CM CM CM iO 1 j r- ,h CM 

CM 


•saiBraaji 


1 CO 
1 1 1 1 1 1 rH 1 CM CM I 1 US iG> 

CM 


•bsibj^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 rH CM 1 CO 1 1 CO CO •* 

00 


PREVIOUS 
DURATION. 


Congenital, . 
Under 1 month, . 
From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 6 years, . 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 

Over 20 years, 

Unknown, . 

Total of cases, 

Total of persons, . 

Average duration in 
years, . 



1901.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



41 



•O I I 



iO I y-> 



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CO I *H 



■S3IBK 



CO I I 



^ r-t | 



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<M I I 



c/2 



23 



5 5 



.a © 



42 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



15. — Causes of Death. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


CAUSES. 




■ 


00 




■ 

V 


00 




» 






■ 

"3 


a 

a 

£ 


"3 

1 


■ 

"3 

a 


"3 

a 

a 

V 


3 

o 
H 


■ 

QS 


3 

S 

S 
h 


3 

o 


Nervous system : — 




















Exhaustion from epilepsy, 


1 
1 


o 
O 


A 

4 


2 




o 

z 


3 


3 


6 


Status epilepticus, . . 


3 




3 


1 




1 


4 




4 


Cerebral thrombosis, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Circulatory system : — 




















Angina pectoris, . . 








1 




1 


1 




1 


Respiratory system : — 




















Acute miliary tuberculo- 
sis, .... 




2 


2 










2 


2 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Pneumonia, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


General : — 




















Suicide by strangulation, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Totals, 


5 


6 


11 


4 


2 


6 


9 


8 


17 



1901.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



43 



as a 
o J 

25 < 



O O 

a a 



•S3IBK 



1 1 r-l | 


1 r— 1 CO iH -I 


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40.22 


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o 


to 


1 1 r-l | 


1 1 <M I 1 


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28.66 



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5 

a ■ 



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I I I I I I th >o i I I i to 



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44 



HOSPITAL 



FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



I I CM I I (N(N I I I I 



I I I I H H I I I I 



55 < 



I I CM I I HH I I I I 



I I I I I | HHMH I 



I | | | I I H | CM i~< | 



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I I I I I I I <M I I I 



I I I I I I rH I (N i— i I 



Ja js J3 ■»•»_• 

. 73 +3 +3 w cq m en 

a c c h h h h 

(~i O (~> W Ci TO C3 

§ 2 2 © a; © © 

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i-fflOOOOOOO 3 ? 

..•-HHW(OH«lOOO t> 

.2 § h ^ ^ o 

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1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



45 



1 1 CO 1 1 CO GO rH ! 1 CM 


i-i CM 

CO 


1 1 1 1 1 NiQH | i | 


CO CM 


1 1 CO 1 1 H CO 1 1 1 CM 


CM 

OS 

iH 

CM 


1 1 1 1 1 1 H^COCO 1 


17 

231.41 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO CM CO 1 


8 

260.25 


1 1 1 1 1 1 HH CO 1 


9 

213.33 


1 1 1 1 1 1 HTftOtO 1 


17 

235.44 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO CN CO 1 


8 

260.25 


1 1 1 1 1 1 HHTf(W 1 


9 

213.33 


1 1 CO I tH CM CO 00 1 1 1 


17 

22.88 


1 1 1 1 1 HNO I 1 1 


oo «o 

CO 
CM 


1 I CO 1 HHHCO I | | 


CO 

OJ CO 

CM 
CM 


1 l 1 I ] |motf5<o 1 


17 

228.82 


1 H I I 1 HrtW I 


GO O 
CM 


1 1 1 1 1 1 HHTjiM | 


9 

218.88 


Epileptic : — 
Congenital, . 
Under 1 month, . 
From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, 
Unknown, 

Totals, 

Average in months, . 



46 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



AETICLES MADE IN THE SEWING ROOM. 



Sheets, .... 


329 


Aprons, .... 


117 


Pillow cases, 


607 


Skirts, . . . 


3 


Pillow ticks, . 


43 


Nightdresses, ... 


4 


Bed ticks, 


16 


Drawers, pairs, 


5 


Table cloths, 


32 


Coats, ..... 


2 


Napkins, 


204 


Bibs, 


21 


Curtains, 


88 


Screen filling, 


1 


Bureau covers, 


21 


Suspenders, pairs, 


26 


Towels,. 


. 1,473 


Garters, pairs, 


68 


Clothes bags, 


42 


Shirts, 


228 


Clothes-pin bag, . 


1 


Bandages, .... 


8 


Tea and coffee bags, . 


33 




11 


Vanilla bean bags, 


4 


Hats trimmed, 


13 


Rugs, .... 


52 


Blankets hemmed, 


29 


Dusters, 


66 


Pads, 


12 


Oven cloths, . 


o 

y 


Mattress protectors, 


a 
2 


Floor swabs, . 


16 


Chest protector, . . . 


1 


Holders, 


4U 


Awnings, .... 


4 


Dress skirt, . 


1 


Trousers shortened, pairs, . 


4U 


oacK, .... 


1 


Sleeves shortened, pairs, 


A 

4 


ARTICLES 


MADE 


IN THE WARDS. 




Shirt waists, . 


13 


Sheets, 


97 


Dresses, 


181 


Dish towels, .... 


161 


Dress skirts, 


7 


Napkins, .... 


51 


Corset covers, 


14 


Holders, .... 


97 


Chemises, 


97 


Scrub cloth, 


1 


Drawers, pairs, . 


107 


Rug 


1 


Petticoats, . 


66 


Aprons, .... 


215 


Nightdresses, 


187 


Rubber aprons, 


4 


Bibs, .... 
Bandages, 


32 
134 


Canvas aprons, 


3 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 47 



AKTICLBS MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Boots made, pairs, 


1 c 


Pillows renovated, . , 


no a 

2o0 


Shoes made, pairs, 


VO 


Pillows made, . . . 


11 


Slippers made, pairs, . 


A O 

4© 


Harnesses repaired, 


21 


Boots, shoes and slippers re- 




Suspenders made, pairs, 


7 


paired, pairs, . ... 


QAK 

oUo 


Wristers made, 


o 

3 


Boots, shoes and slippers 




Shoulder brace made, . . 


1 


marked, .... 




Carriage robes made, . 


3 


Cfoi-v lorlrlovc madp 




l/ltl\> t L LllilHL, ... 


i 

i 


Clothes racks made, 


2 


Garden hoes made, 


2 


Mops made, .... 


28 


Base balls made, . 


4 


Milk stool made, . 


1 


Baskets made, 


12 


Blanket box covers made, . 


8 


Base ball mittens made, 


2 


Tent poles made, . 


30 


Face protector made, . 


1 


Clothes hangers made, . 


126 


Garden rakes made, 


5 


Ice cart covering made, 


1 


Stands made, 


4 


Coats made, .... 


261 


Screens made, 


2 


Vests made, .... 


62 


Hair picked, pounds, . 


75 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


112 


Blankets eyeleted, 


19 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


20 


Chairs reseated, . 


27 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


24 


Electric poles peeled, . 


12 


Undershirts made, 


36 


Piazza floor wedged, . 


1 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


24 


Cigar box made, . 


1 


Match holders made, . 


30 


Blanks printed, 


10,865 


Sawdust bags made, 


12 


Weekly paper printed, copies, 


2,530 



48 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



FAEM PRODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1900, to Oct. 1, 1901. 



Milk, 124,565 quarts, $4,982 60 

Eggs, 164^ dozen, 41 08 

Hay, 188 tons, 3,384 00 

Meadow hay, 17 tons, 170 00 

Oat hay, 7 tons, 84 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons 900 00 

Green fodder, 16 tons . . . 48 00 

Rhubarb, 2,090 pounds, 83 60 

Strawberries, 555 quarts, . . 83 25 

Currants, 273 quarts, 27 30 

Lettuce, 4,243 heads, 84 86 

Green peas, 69f bushels, 87 17 

Cucumbers, 4,492, 89 84 

Cucumbers for pickles, 3^ bushels, 5 62 

Sweet corn, 5,222 ears, 52 22 

Tomatoes, ripe, 148 bushels, $88.80 ; green, 100 bushels, S50.00, 138 80 

Beet greens, 12 bushels, 6 00 

Winter squash, 1,700 pounds, 17 00 

Garden beans, 34 bushels, 34 00 

Peaches, U bushels, 300 

Pears, 13 bushels, 26 00 

Quinces, 1£ bushels 1 50 

Apples, 250 barrels, 750 00 

Cider apples, 75 bushels, 11 25 

Crab apples, 7£ bushels, 7 50 

Plums, i bushel 50 

Radishes, 206 bunches, 10 30 

Horseradish, 15 barrels, 15 00 

Peppers, f bushel, 75 

Potatoes, 650 bushels, 650 00 

Cabbage, If tons 52 50 

Turnips, 125 bushels, 50 00 

Table beets, 53 bushels, 39 75 

Carrots, 64£ bushels, 38 70 

Onions, 188* bushels 188 50 



Amount carried forward, $12,164 59 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 49 

Amount brought forward, f 12,164 59 

Cherries, 15 quarts, . 1 50 

Beans, 6 bushels, 15 00 

Broom corn, £ acre, 25 00 

Field corn, 185 bushels, 138 75 

Mangel beets, 50 bushels, 15 00 

Summer squash, 500, 25 00 

Pigs sold, 68, 164 75 

Calves sold, 21, 61 65 

Hides sold, 482 pounds, 28 56 

Tallow sold, 41£ pounds, 91 

Wool sold, 264£ pounds, 47 36 

Beef sold, 479 79 

Pork sold, 137 55 

Onions sold, 4 bushels, 2 90 

Cabbage sold, 1,414 pounds, . . . . . . . 14 14 

Apples sold, 5 barrels, 6 35 

Cabbage plants sold, 93 

Peas sold, \ bushel, 20 

Strawberries, 1 quart, 15 

Parsnips sold, 1 bushel, 60 

Sheep and lamb pelts sold, 8 85 

Horseradish sold, 10 barrels, 10 00 

Pork, 2,890 pounds 194 19 

Lard, 40 pounds, 3 20 

Fowl, 20 pounds 2 80 

Chickens, 17£ pounds, 3 68 

Mutton, 314 pounds, 28 26 

Lamb, 524£ pounds, 81 58 

Beef, 1,855 pounds, 127 65 

Vegetables from greenhouse : — 

Spinach, 5 bushels, 6 25 

Lettuce, 120 heads, 6 00 

Tomatoes, 11 bushels, 11 00 

Parsley, £ bushel, 50 

Asparagus, 4 bushels, 8 00 

Celery, 12 bunches, 14 00 

Radishes, 4 bushels, 9 00 

Peas, 8 bushels, 10 00 

Beans, 9 bushels, 9 00 

Grapes, 1 bushel, 50 

Tomato plants, 700, 10 50 



Total, $13,875 64 



50 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, $2,500 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 1,250 00 

Treasurer, per year, 300 00 

Clerk, per year, 500 00 

Stenographer, per month, 25 00 

Steward, per month, 55 00 

Drug clerk, per month, 25 00 

Night nurses (men, 2), per month, 20 00 

Nurses (men, 11), per month, ...... $20 00-30 00 

Night nurses (women, 2), per month, 18 00 

Nurses (women, 13), per month, 14 00-22 00 

Engineer, per year, 900 00 

Assistant engineer, per month, 45 00 

Helper, per month, 35 00 

Firemen (2), per month, 25 00-28 00 

Watchman, per month, 25 00 

Baker, per month, 40 00 

Cooks (4), per month, 22 00-25 00 

Assistant cooks (2), per month, 14 00 

Table girls (3), per month, . . 18 00 

Foreman industrial room, per month, 40 00 

Seamstress, per month, 25 00 

Assistant seamstress, per month, 18 00 

Laundress, per month, 25 00 

Laundrymen (2), per month, 20 00 

Assistant laundresses (3), per month, .... 14 00-18 00 

Farmer, per year, 700 00 

Assistant farmers (6), per month, 20 00-30 00 

Handy man, per month, 33 00 

Gardener, per month, 35 00 

Driver, per month, 32 00 

Head carpenter, per day, 2 50 

Assistant carpenters (2), per day, 2 25 

Painter, per day, 2 00 

Mason, per day, 2 50 



1901.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 51 



Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



NAMES. 


Residence. 


When ap- 
pointed. 


Service ended. 


William N. Bullard, M.D., . 


Boston, . 


1895 


Still in office. 


Albert C. Getchell, M.D., 


Worcester, 


1895 


1900. Resigned. 


Bnrnham R. Benner, M.D., . 


Lowell, . 


1895 


1901. Resigned. 


Adelaide A Calkins, 


Springfield, 


1895 


Still in office. 


Charles A. Clough, .... 


Boston, . 


1895 


Still in office. 


William S. Hyde,* .... 


Ware, . 


1895 


Died in office. 


Mabel W. Stedman, 


Brook line, 


1895 


Still in office. 


Henry M. Phillips, . . 


Springfield, . 


1899 


Still in office. 


Henry P. Jaques, M.D., . 


Lenox, . 


1900 


Still in office. 


Walter W. Schofield, M.D., . 


Dalton, . 


1901 


Still in office. 



* Deceased. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OP THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 

FOB THE 

Year ending September 30, 1902. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1903. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS : M™><™ 

Hospital for Epileptics r 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 

FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1902. 




^ BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1903. 



**NSI 1921 

STATE HOUSE, BOSlXMi 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



3 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

List of Officers, 5 

Trustees' Report, 7 

Report of Superintendent,' 10 

Admissions and Discharges, 10 

Training School, 11 

Papers written, 12 

Observations under Way, 13 

I Gifts 13 

Patients employed, 14 

Amusements, 15 

Schools, 15 

Articles made and repaired in Sewing Room, 16 

Articles made and repaired in the Wards, s 17 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Rooms 18 

Farm Products, 20 

List of Persons regularly employed, 22 

General Information, 23 

Treasurer's Report, 24 

Statistical Tables, 29 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

I 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, . . . Boston. 

CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary, Groton. 

ADELAIDE A. CALKINS, Springfield. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Brookline. 

HEXRY P. JAQTJES, M.D., Lenox. 

WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D., Dalton. 

WINFORD N. CALDWELL, Springfield. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., Superintendent. 

ARTHUR 0. MORTON, M.D., } Assistant Physician and 

MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., ) Pathologist. 

LILLIAN M. KINCAID, Clerk. 

MARY W. WENTWORTH, Stenographer. 

CHARLES F. SIMONDS, Steward and Storekeeper* 

GEORGE E. BATES, Engineer. 

J. W. WILLIAMS, Farmer. 



TREASURER. 

CHAS. B. FISKE, Palmer. 

Office at the Hospital. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and Honorable Council. 

We have to report the following appropriations, and dispo- 
sition made of them. 

The only unexpended appropriation of 1900 is one of $9,500 
for a laundry building and machinery. This building is 120 
feet long, 60 feet wide, constructed with a monitor roof. It 
has a granolithic floor over one half and a wooden floor with a 
large basement room in the other half. The basement room 
will be available for the use of steam fitters' supplies and appa- 
ratus, and will make a convenient work room for steam fitting 
and other such work. 

The construction of this building has gone on very slowly, 
because we have tried to have as much of the work as possible 
done by the labor of the patients and of the regular hospital 
employees ; it is now, however, practically completed, and 
some of the machinery has already been put in place. It is 
likely that the transfer of the rest of the machines from the 
old laundry and the purchase of such new machines as our 
means will allow will be completed within the next few months. 
We now feel that we have a thoroughly convenient and com- 
modious laundry. 

The treasurer's statement renders an account of all other 
appropriations in full for the year 1900. 

The buildings erected with these funds have now been fully 
completed and furnished. 

Appropriations for the construction and furnishing of a 
nurses' home and for an electric building and its equipment 
were granted us by the last Legislature, and the work on 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



these buildings has been begun. An immense amount of re- 
search has been necessary relative to the electric outfit ; but 
we hope to install a plant that will be both economical and 
capable of being modified to such a degree that it will not soon 
become out of date. By the application of this power, light 
and heat, we shall be able to carry on our work much more 
satisfactorily and with greater economy. 

The home for nurses, women only, provides a small single 
room for each nurse. We have made this building plain, and 
reduced its size and the price for its construction to a very low 
limit. The furnishing will also have to be most economically 
managed ; but we expect it to provide for the women nurses 
more satisfactory and comfortable quarters than they now have, 
as well as to diminish somewhat the crowded condition of the 
wards by making available for patients some rooms now used 
for nurses. 

We have already submitted to the State Board a statement 
covering in a general way our plans for the future. We trust 
that we may accomplish our part in filling in the general plan 
of the State Board in caring for the insane and epileptic. We 
expect to provide for a few more patients this year and for 
others in the succeeding years as means are granted us, and to 
do this, a pretty definite plan has been reached, — one which 
will, in our opinion, best further the interests of the several 
grades of patients to be cared for here. 

For the coming year our plans have been practically matured, 
though we have had to select from among a number of very 
pressing needs those most immediately pressing. We have de- 
cided our most urgent requirement to be a farm group to care 
for our farm workers, both patients and employees, and to give 
increased space jfor stock and produce. The removal of this 
group of patients from our present buildings will enable us to 
classify our patients to better advantage than before, since we 
can thus separate our farm working patients from the other 
patients, giving them greater liberties and privileges, while at 
the same time rendering them more efficient for our work ; 
removing the farm employees somewhat from the general em- 
ployees of the hospital, and providing for a certain number of 
additional patients. We also consider that it is wise to increase 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



9 



our facilities for producing milk and farm produce. These re- 
sults may be accomplished by the construction of entirely new 
buildings for the farm group, or it may come about from the 
purchase of land upon which certain buildings already exist, 
modifying these buildings to meet our needs and constructing 
new ones. The cost will be practically the same in either case. 

The estimate for this, being reduced to the lowest economical 
limit, has been set at $50,000. Accurate figures and details 
will, according to custom, be furnished to the State Board. 
For this sum we expect to add buildings for the accommodation 
of about 40 patients who can do farm work, a suitable home 
for our farmer and his helpers and to furnish facilities for the 
care of additional stock ; and we hereby petition the Legis- 
lature for an appropriation of that sum, to be expended, or so 
much of it as shall be necessary, for such purposes. 

To our great regret, Col. H. M. Phillips declined reappoint- 
ment last July. He has been a valuable member of the Board, 
and from his special knowledge has been able to furnish us 
with information which we could have obtained only with great 
difficulty elsewhere. Mr. W. N. Caldwell of Springfield has 
been appointed his successor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD. 
CHARLES A. CLOUGH. 
ADELAIDE A. CALKINS. 
MABEL W. STEDMAN. 
HENRY P. JAQUES. 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD. 
WINFORD N. CALDWELL. 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 
The following report is respectfully submitted : — 



Number of patients Sept. 30, 1901, 270 

Since admitted : — 

Sane (4 from visit), 69 

Insane, 115 

Discharged and on visit : — 

Sane. — Much improved, 1 

Improved, 18 

Not improved, 9 

Died, 7 

On visit, 11 

Escaped, 1 

47 

Insane. — Improved, 11 

Not improved, 3 

Died 14 

On visit, 2 

30 

Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1902 377 

Daily average of patients, 322.63 

Per capita cost (per week), $4.31 



I have attempted to render such a statement as, taken in 
conjunction with the reports of previous years, will make a 
connected account of all the main features of our work so far 
as they come under my care. 

In an institution where there are so many pressing needs it 
is not easy to select the most urgent ; but after careful consider- 
ation of all our circumstances I wish to present the following, 
as in my judgment requiring early action : — 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



Needs of Present Year. 

1. Farm group as outlined. 

2. Additional room, so that there may be a general em- 
ployees' dining room. 

Needs or Next Year. 

1. A cold storage plant. 

2. An asylum building for the special care of 50 men ; an 
asylum building for the special care of 50 women. 

3. Balconies on the present men's and women's hospitals. 

4. A laboratory building. 

I am well aware that we need separate cottages for colony 
cases ; but it seems to me that by providing a farm group and 
asylum buildings we shall be able so to classify and rearrange 
that this end will be partly attained, and that we can make a 
good number of strictly sane cases very comfortable and give 
them advanced treatment. The cottages may possibly be de- 
ferred. 

As for the asylum plan, we certainly feel a pressing need of 
suitable houses for the insane. An insane department under 
a separate medical head, so far as may be thought wise, but for 
the convenience of frequent transfers not too far away, is, 
in my judgment, desirable for the welfare of the patients. 
Maniacal attacks are so frequent and unavoidable, even with 
many of the best class of cases, that such a building needs to 
be a part of our general plan, just as our present infirmary is 
needed for the temporarily sick. 

Training School. 

List of Graduates, Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics Training 
School for Nurses, 1902. 

Manwarring, Annabelle M. D. Manwarring, Edwin S. 

Rowe, Hattie E. McKeever, James L. 

Smith, Alice B. McKeever, Walter L. 
Briggs, Carroll W. 



12 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 

Medical Lectures. 



[Oct. 



DATE. 



N 



[AME. 



Subject. 



1902. 



Jan. 31, 

Feb. 6, 

Feb. 14, 

Feb. 21, 



Dr. H. C. Emerson, 
Dr. H. C. Emerson, 
Dr. M. B. Hodskins, 
Dr. A. O. Morton, . 



Bacteriology. 
Bacteriology. 
Typhoid fever. 

Diseases of the organs of respira- 



March 14, 
March 20, 



Dr. P. W. Soule, 
Dr. G. E Fuller, 



tion. 

Some facts about the teeth. 
Reminiscences from a physician^ 



life. 



March 25, 

April 4, 

April 11, 

April 17, 

April 18, 

April 25, 

May 25, 



Dr. Everett Flood, 



Dr. L. C. Miller, 



Dr. J. P. Schneider, 
Dr. A. C. Getchell, 
Dr. T. S. Bacon, . 



i/i . jl . o. uauuu, 

Dr. A. C Getchell, 
Dr. T. S. Bacon, . 



Hygiene of the sick room. 

Vaccination. 

The heart. 

Communicable diseases. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis 
General points in nursing. 
Closing address and presentation 



of diplomas. 



The training school course has been lengthened to three 



by the superintendent and his assistants : — 

1. Two addresses on subjects not medical. 

2. Address before men's meeting, Monson, on " State Charities." 

3. Address to graduates of training class. 

4. Paper on " Terms used to describe epileptic phenomena," be- 
fore the Hampden District Medical Society. 

5. Abstract of Kraepelin on katatonia. 

6. Abstract of Kraepelin on dementia precox. 

7. Typhoid fever, for training class. 

8. Diseases of the organs of respiration, for the training class. 

9. The lymphatic system. 

10. A few points on urinalysis. 

11. Manual of instruction, for employees. 

12. Enumeration of the epileptic persons in Hampden County and 
three towns of Worcester County. 

18. Care of epileptics in Massachusetts, for "American Academy 
of Medicine." 

14. Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics, for " American Journal 
of Insanity." 




1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



Many of these papers have been put in print by the indus- 
trial room plant. 

Observations under Way. 

1. Psychological studies. 

2. Observations on diet. 

3. Treatment of ordinary conditions. 

4. Treatment of status. 

5. Training: self-restraint; industrial; school. 

6. The well meaning of epileptics. 

7. The dependence of epileptics. 

8. The frequency of accidents, and ways in which they 
happen . 

9. The need of separate buildings and separate rooms for 
some cases. 

10. Advantages of epileptic persons being treated at a con- 
siderable distance from their homes. 

The Per Capita Cost. 

The per capita cost is apparently lower than ever before. 
This is largely due to the fact that a large part of the coal on our 
contract was not delivered until after October 1. The outlay 
goes over to the next year. 

We hope and expect to reduce our cost year by year ; but 
there are also several reasons why the rate is naturally higher 
than in some other institutions : — 

1. The institution is new. 

2. The number of patients small. 

3. Cost of treatment is larger than with ordinary chronic 
cases. 

4. Our patients are invalids, and not capable of accomplish- 
ing a large amount of work. 

5. A greater number of attendants is needed. 

6. A variety of food is demanded. 

7. The patients are largely sane people, requiring a great 
deal of individual consideration in clothing and treatment. 

Gifts. 

I am glad to render grateful acknowledgment for the fol- 
lowing gifts : — 



14 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



NAME. 


Residence. 


Gift. 


Mrs. Mabel StedtDan, 


J)lUUlillUC f • 


Bilk pieces. 


Dr. Henry P. Jaques, 




Pony and harness. 


-A friend, . • . 


\Vey mouth 9 • 
Foxborough, 


Two boxes, containing books, papers, magazines 
and clothing. 

Box, containing books, papers and magazines. 


Ur. 1 1 . r . r>owaiicn, 


DUCLUUj • • 


Medical books. 


Air. <_ . n.. r isn» • • 


1* aimer • • 


Papers and magazines. 


Afro W ft TTvHp 

Aiib. w . o. xiyue, • • 


Ware . • 


Books. 


T\v Wm R n 1 1 Q vA 

xJ r . wra. i> . ouuaru, • 




Medical magazines. 


-Hi. X>UXlUii r. liccUj • 


l>OBton • • 


Clothing. 




Palmer • • 


Papers and magazines. 


Aiiss v\nnie n.. r leneruicK, 


L til ill C I | • • 


Papers and magazines. 


Rev. W. H. Hart, . 


Palmer, 


Papers and magazines. 


Mr. Thaddeus Cushnian, 


Monson, . 


Papers and magazines. 


Miss Cusbman, 


Monson, . 


Book. 


Central Massachusetts 
Electric Company, C.E. 
Fish, Manager. 

Mr. Frank d. Keith, 


Palmer, 
Palmer, 


Admission of patients to theatre at Forest Lake, 
on various occasions. 

Papers and magazines. 


Mrs. E. A. Allis, 


Boston, 


Magazines. 


A friend 


Palmer, 

1 


Papers and magazines. 



Table showing Patients employed, and in what Way. 




Grading, .... 
Industrial building : — 

Chair seating, . 

Printing, . 

Tailoring, cutting, 

Tailoring, sewing, 

Cobbling, . 

Jobbing, . 

Carving, . 

Hair picking, 

Shoe sewing, 

Mat making, 
Employees 1 cottage, . 
Dining rooms, . 
Teaching, .... 
Music practice for assemblies, 
Kitchens, .... 
Laundry, .... 
With yard man, 
Stone, etc., 
Paintiner. . 



27 




2 

3 




1 




1 




2 




1 




1 




2 




1 




1 






4 


8 


10 




1 


1 




12 


28 


6 


56 


5 




20 




4 





1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 15 

Table showing Patients employed, and in what Way — Concluded. 



On roads, . 

Stable 

Sewing rooms, 

Ward work, 

Administration building, 

Laboratory, 

Clerical, 

Weaving, 

Farm : — 

Such work as apple picking, barn, vegetable garden, 
clearing land, cutting brush, ditching, teaming, 
tending sheep, tending cows, milking, with gar- 
dener, 



Totals, 



Amusements. 

Dances, 47 ; sheet and pillow-case masquerade, 1 ; whist 
party, 1: readings and impersonations, 10; lecture, 44 A Trip 
to Brazil," 1 ; illustrated lecture, 44 A Curious Entertainment," 
1; illustrated lecture, * 4 Expositions," 1 ; sessions of dancing 
school, 7 ; illustrated lectures, 44 The Passion Play," 2 ; enter- 
tainment, 44 Legerdemain," 1; entertainment, 44 Ventrilo- 
quism," 1 ; musicales, 3 ; phonograph concert, 1 ; farce, 44 Mr. 
Bob," 1 ; farce, 44 Sunbonnets," 1 ; farce, 44 A Chinese Dummy," 
1; comedy, 4 4 The Old Maids' Association," 1; excursions to 
Forest Lake, 19 ; sleigh rides, 15 ; carriage rides, 12 ; excur- 
sion to Palmer, May 30, 1902, to see parade, 1. 

Schools. 

Average number of persons attending school, males, 8 ; fe- 
males, 14 ; one patient, who is an experienced teacher, assists 
the instructors. Instruction is given in (1) the kindergarten ; 
(2) reading; (3) waiting; (4) numbers; (5) geography; (6) 
history; (7) nature study ; (8) calisthenics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
SEWING ROOM. 



Sheets made, 


219 


Piano cover made, 


1 


Pillow cases made, 


374 


Aprons made, 


133 


Pillow ticks made, 


84 


Skirts made, .... 


2 


Tablecloths made, 


96 


Shirt waist made, . 


1 


Napkins made, 


445 


Night dresses made, 


8 


Curtains made, 


10 


Chemises made, . 


6 


Sash curtains made, pairs, . 


27 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


18 


Bureau and commode covers 




Bibs made, .... 


72 


made, .... 


151 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


55 


Towels made, 


3,002 


Garters made, pairs, 


106 


Clothes bags made, 


63 


Neckties made, 


11 


Tea and coffee bags made, . 


48 


Chair covers made, 


4 


Rugs made, .... 


145 


Hats trimmed, 


22 


Dusters made, 


102 


Blankets hemmed, 


126 


Oven cloths made, 


52 


Overcoats repaired, 


59 


Floor swabs made, 


328 


Trousers shortened, pairs, . 


31 


Shirts made, .... 


246 


Sleeves shortened, pairs, 


3 


Night shirts made, 


219 







1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 

WARDS. 



npiUUS iiicHitr, ■ • 


91 Q 


vUalo icllllcvl, . , • 


9 


Rprl en^lrs m(*f\& rmirc 

JJtrW SUtUB lUdUO, JJiUIJ, 


i J. V 




71 


JJLUS niauc, ■ . • 


9 


V^lltJLLUoCS LlitJIlUcUj • • 


50 


\~\ a rr\ Icoc Y\~\ o rl o 

^iitJiiiiseo luduc, i > 


• oo 


1 IVDCCQO tY> ATI ndn 


oo\J 




40 


i/icoots aiiui Lc ll cu , • ■ 




xJi. LIJiiUL , • • 


111 




1 KQ 


i/laWclo LUdCic, pans, • 


SO 


->X1 1 1 c US IllclJUtU, UftilO) • 


1 9 


Tlviacc cVirf c mQ/io 
1/lCSB SKILLS LUaUt, • 


o 


xNlglll UlcobtJb lllciliUcU, 


ZD L 


^JinrVit Hrpsepa marlp 

lllgUl KXl CSSCB LLldUC, ■ 


53 

■ oo 




337 
OO 1 


Night shirts made, 


12 


Overalls mended, pairs, 


318 


Petticoats made, . 


52 


Petticoats mended, 


198 


Restraints made, . 


26 


Shirts mended, 


594 


Shirt waists made, 


9 


Shirt waists mended, . 


27 


Clothes bags made, 


23 


Stockings mended, pairs, 


2,718 


Curtains made, 


25 


Trousers mended, pairs, 


482 


Christmas bags made, . 


400 


Underdrawers mended, pairs, 


1,312 


Dish cloths made, 


4 


Undervests mended, 


441 


Iron holders made, 


296 


Bedspreads mended, 


7 


Rug made, . 


1 


Blankets mended, 


2 


Sheets made, 


61 


Bed ticks mended, 


2 


Screens made, 


10 


Clothes bags mended, . 


33 


Towels made, 


612 


Pillow slips mended, . 


2 


Aprons mended, . 


186 


Sheets mended, 


43 


Bibs mended, 


16 


Towels mended, . 


22 


Coats mended, 


470 


Tablecloths mended, . 


5 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOMS. 



Boots made, pair, . 


i 
i 


L/UeCKeio LUautJ, . . 


240 


Shoes made, pairs, . 


134 


Flower stands made, . . 


A 


Slippers made, pairs, 




jyiiitens maue, pair», . . 


9Qfi 


Boots, shoes and slippers re- 




j-iouseio maue, pdiia, • . 




paired, .... 


yob 


Overalls made, pairs, 


1 Q7 


Boots, shoes and slippers 




Jumpers made, 


no 
to 


marked, pairs, 


122 


Vests made, . 


AO 

Mo 


Hammer handles made, . 


1 1 
11 


Drawers made, pairs, 


1 0"7 

187 


Pillows made, . . 


1 oo 


Coats made, . . . . 


1 A A 


Picture frames made, 


O 

z 


Shirts made, . 


0a 


Arbor poles made, . 


Q 




Suits made, . 


Q 

o 


>> ire luingeia iiittue, . • 


910 


Dresses made, . . . 


AH 


v. (mi iKuigeis uidue, . • 


ft. 3 


Dress skirts made, . . 


1 ft 


Slabs for cemetery made, 


9 


Aprons made, . 


103 


Box traps made, 


2 


Petticoats made, 


67 


Boxes made, .... 


11 


Chemises made, 


127 


Squirrel cage made, 


1 


Night dresses made, 


105 


Rustic seats made, . 


4 


Towels made, . 


40 


Lawn swings made, 


2 


Bandages made, 


541 


Brooms made, 


108 


Wristers made, pairs, 


2 


Broom corn seeded, acre, 


1 


Water-bottle bags made, 


2 


Bootjack made, 


1 


Holders made, 


25 


Screens made, 


3 


Bibs made, . 


2 


Match safes made, . 


48 


Clock case made, . 


1 


Report boards made, 


2 


Crutches made, pair, 


1 


Tin name holders made, 


325 


Hair picked, pounds, 


100 


Yoke for steers made, . 


1 


Pamphlets printed, 


70 


Medicine closets made, . 


4 


Weekly paper printed, copies, 


4,050 


Greenhouse tags made, . 


775 


Blanks printed, 


96,180 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No . 62. 


1 1\ 
19 


Pillows renovated, . 


607 


Whips repaired, 


4 


Umbrellas repaired, 


41 


Blankets eyeletted, 


48 


Suspenders repaired, pairs, . 


34 


Chairs reseated, 


40 


Screens repaired, . 


11 


Clothes bars repaired, . 


2 


Harnesses repaired, 


37 


Mail bags repaired, 


2 


Baseballs repaired, 


2 


Settee repaired, 


1 


Baskets repaired, . 


60 


Step ladders repaired, . 


5 


Checkerboard stands painted, 


12 


Truss repaired, 


1 


Chair cushions repaired, 


3 


Hassocks repaired, . 


4 


Piano stool repaired, 


1 


Cart repaired, . 


1 


Butter tubs cut down, . 


50 


Hymnals repaired, . 


30 


Barber chairs repaired, . 


4 


Belts repaired, 


6 


Stands repaired, 


3 


Beans picked over, bushels, 


3 


Carriage mat repaired, . 


1 


Shoulder braces repaired, 


4 


Carriage robes repaired, 


2 


Lawn swing repaired, . 


1 


Curtains hung, 


41 


Pieces mended, 


2,418 


Horse blankets repaired, 


4 







\ 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



FARM PRODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1901, to Oct. 1, 1902. 



Milk, 134,874 quarts • f 6,743 70 

Eggs, 232 dozen, 58 00 

Hay, 187 tons, 3,179 00 

Meadow hay, 18 tons, 180 00 

Oat hay, 10 tons 120 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons 900 00 

Green fodder, 69 tons, 207 00 

Rhubarb, 435 pounds, 17 40 

Strawberries, 50 quarts, . . 6 00 

Currants, 271 quarts, 27 10 

Lettuce, 1,695 heads 33 90 

Green peas, 95£ bushels, 119 37 

Radishes, 9 bushels, 18 00 

Cucumbers, 4,718 4 36 

Cucumbers for pickles, 13 bushels, 19 50 

Sweet corn, 9,648 ears, 96 48 

Tomatoes, ripe, 94^ bushels, 47 12 

Tomatoes, green, 49 00 

Peaches, £ bushel, 1 00 

Pears, 9£ bushels 19 00 

Crab apples, 13£ bushels, 13 50 

Apples, 800 barrels, 1,000 00 

Cider apples, 1,500 bushels, 150 00 

Summer squash, 2,575 pounds, 64 37 

Winter squash, 4£ tons, 90 00 

Garden beans, 28<| bushels, 28 50 

Beans, 30 bushels, 30 00 

Quinces, 1 bushel, 1 00 

Pumpkins, 500, 5 00 

Horseradish, 2 barrels, 2 00 

Peppers, 2 bushels, 2 00 

Potatoes, 636 bushels, 477 00 

Cabbage, 9 tons, 180 00 

Turnips, 556 bushels, 194 60 

Beets, 460 bushels, 230 00 

Carrots, 410 bushels, 205 00 



Amount carried forward $14,518 90 



li>02.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 21 

Amount brought forward, $ 14,518 90 

Onions, 160 bushels, 160 00 

Field corn, 700 bushels, 455 00 

Broom corn, 1 acre, 40 00 

Blackberries, 40 quarts, 4 80 

Parsnips, 135 bushels, 101 25 

Grapes, bh bushels, 2 75 

Greens, 98 bushels, 49 00 

Wool, 275 pounds, 55 00 

Pigs sold, 59, 211 50 

Calves sold, 17, 28 00 

Lamb sold, 1 8 00 

Onions sold, 25£ bushels, 32 00 

Green tomatoes sold, £ bushel, 25 

Hides sold, 97 pounds, 5 67 

Pork sold, 109 52 

Cabbage plants sold, 3 00 

Lamb pelts sold, 23, 13 65 

Calf skins sold, 2, . 1 20 

Vegetables from greenhouse : — 

Cabbages, 450 38 40 

Lettuce, 546 heads, 10 92 

Tomatoes, 18 bushels, 12 00 

Spinach, 3 bushels, 2 00 

Parsley, 3 bushels, 2 00 

Squashes, 100, 1 00 

Cauliflower, 65 heads, 9 75 

Beans, 7 bushels, 7 00 

Peas, 6£ bushels, 6 50 

Onions, 4 bushels, 4 00 

Carrots, 5 bushels, 3 00 

Beets, 5 bushels 3 00 

Celery, 432 heads, 11 50 

Corn, 2 bushels 1 00 

Turnips, 4 bushels, 1 50 

Pumpkins, 40, 40 

Cucumbers, 300, 7 00 

Dandelions, 6 bushels, 6 00 

Peppers, £ bushel, 50 

Radishes, 2 bushels, 2 00 

Grapes, h, bushel, 1 00 

Tomato plants for farm, 750, 10 75 

Cabbage plants for farm, 250, 50 

Lettuce plants for farm, 300, 1 50 

Pepper plants for farm, 1 box, 50 

Celery plants for farm, 1 box, 50 



Total, . $15,943 71 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



LIST OF PERSONS 



Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, 
Assistant physicians (2), per year 
Treasurer, per year, 
Clerk, per year, . 
Stenographer, per month, 
Steward, per year, 
Drug clerk, per month, 
Superintendent of nurses, per month, 
Supervisor (woman), per month, 
Supervisor (man), per month, 
Night nurses (women, 5), per month, 
Nurses (women, 16), per month, 
Night nurses (men, 5), per month, 
Nurses (men, 17), per month, 
Engineer, per year, 
Assistant engineer, per month, 
Helper, per month, 
Firemen (3), per month, 
Baker, per month, 
Kitchen man, per month, 

Handy man, 

Cooks (4), per month, . 
Assistant cooks (3), per month, . 
Table girls (4), per month, . 
Foreman industrial room, per month, 
Seamstress, per month, 
Assistant seamstresses (2), per month 
Laundress, per month, . 
Laundryman, per month, 
Assistant laundresses (5), per month, 
Farmer, per year, .... 
Assistant farmers (9), per month, 
Gardener, per month, . 
Driver, per month, 
Head carpenter, per day, 
Assistant carpenters (3), per day, 
Painter, per day, 



$2,500 00 
1,000 00 
300 00 
600 00 
30 00 
710 00 
25 00 
24 00 

24 00 
30 00 

$14 00-18 00 
14 00-22 00 
20 00-23 00 
20 00-32 00 
950 00 
45 00 
30 00 
$23 00-25 00 
45 00 

25 00 
33 00 

$22 00-25 00 
16 00-18 00 
14 00-18 00 
45 00 
30 00 
$14 00-18 00 
23 00 
20 00 
$16 00-18 00 
850 00 
$20 00-30 00 
27 50 
32 00 
2 50 
2 25 
2 00 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 23 



GENEKAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent ; in this case the approval of a judge is 
required in addition to the physician's certificate and the notifi- 
cation of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Every patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet and to go to 
bed early. Those restrictions are not irksome when they are 
fully understood and can be easily complied with. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London & 
Northern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River 
branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in 
Palmer, the other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from 
Boston, and the railroad fare is $1.90. 



24 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this hospital for the year ending Sept. 30, 1902. 



Assets. 

Real estate : — 



Cultivated land, 113 acres, .... 


$17,311 


00 




1,465 


00 


Pasturage, 92 acres, 


4,237 


00 


Farm (under appropriation 1901), 120 acres, . 


3,000 


00 


Water and sewerage systems, .... 


30,200 


00 


Addition to water and sewerage systems, 


3,013 


00 




450 


00 


Tinil (lines • 






Original buildings . 


$37,770 


00 


Rnilflincrs f nndpr atinronriAtion 1895^ 


84 000 


00 


Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . 


85,000 


00 


Greenhouse 


1,100 


00 


Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), 


4,600 


00 


Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), 


500 


00 


Laundry (under appropriation 1901), 


5,074 


97 


Personal estate : — 






Live stock on the farm, 


$5,946 


00 


Produce of the farm on hand, .... 


7,161 


u 


Carriages and agricultural implements, . 


3,490 


00 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 


31,151 


01 


Beds and bedding in inmates 1 department, 


8,708 


46 


Other furniture in inmates 1 department, . 


16,996 


17 


Personal property of State in administration 






building and employees 1 cottage, . 


7,462 


70 


Ready-made clothing, 


1,202 


92 


Dry goods, 


4,240 


60 


Provisions and groceries, 


1,861 


55 


Drugs and medicines, 


2,725 


43 


Fuel 


3,525 


00 




625 


00 


Other supplies undistributed, .... 


6,977 


30 



$59,676 00 



218,044 97 



102,073 58 



$379,794 55 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



25 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1901, $5,641 02 

Received from State appropriations : — 

Cottage for patients, 1899, $1,068 86 

Infirmary building, 1899, 8,873 88 

Boiler plant, 1900, 553 63 

Laundry building and machinery, 1901, . . 5,074 97 

Furnishing new buildings, 1901, . . . 17,485 16 

Painting 894 00 

Electric building and machinery, 1902, . . 279 71 

Nurses 1 home, 1902, 7 13 

For current expenses, 1901, .... 2,919 96 

For current expenses, 1902, .... 50,561 31 

Total from appropriations, . . . 87,718 61 

Received from State for support of patients, . $5,560 74 
Received from towns for support of patients, . 35,446 35 
Received from individuals for support of pa- 
tients, 3,978 28 

Received from soldiers 1 relief for support of 

patients, 695 24 

Received from interest on bank balance, . 254 15 

Received from farm and farm products, . . 740 60 

Received from store, . . . . 434 84 

Received from barrels, junk and sundries, . 124 61 

Received from forfeit on contract, . . . 100 00 

47,334 81 



Total receipts, $140,694 44 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, wages and labor, $ 30,363 18 

Food : — 

Butter . $2,678 53 

Beans, 54 55 

Bread and crackers, 157 16 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc , 628 53 

Cheese, 44 69 

Eggs, 1,330 22 

Flour 1,960 25 

Fish, 591 92 

Fruit,. 717 93 

Meats, . . . . . . . . 4,537 11 

Milk, 210 56 

Molasses, 178 59 

Sugar, . 1,128 61 



Amounts carried forward, .... $14,218 65 $30,363 18 



26 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



Amounts brought forward, . 



Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, 
Vegetables, 

Sundries, .... 



Clothing and clothing material : 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 
Clothing, .... 
Dry goods for clothing, etc., 
Hats and caps, . 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, .... 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 
Brushes, brooms, etc., 
Carpets, rugs, etc., . 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 
Furniture and upholstery, 
Kitchen furnishings, 
Woodenware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, 

Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, 

Electricity, .... 

Gas, 

Oil 

Sundries 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Bricks, 

Cement, lime and plaster, 

Doors, sashes, etc., .... 

Electrical work and supplies, . 

Hardware, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., .... 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 

Roofing and materials, 

Sundries, 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies, . 
Carriages, wagons and repairs, 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . 
H a y> grain, etc , 
Harness aud repairs, . 

Amounts carried forward, . 



$14,218 65 

375 88 
964 45 
614 89 



$100 13 
311 06 
1,085 16 
20 25 
202 49 
2 48 



|317 59 
129 49 

97 34 
169 57 
124 43 
388 02 
323 90 

37 63 



f6,014 50 
58 91 
430 62 
136 18 
125 86 



$48 00 
223 16 
440 97 
276 63 
365 63 
327 51 
109 76 
481 64 
1,019 63 
179 56 
29 75 



$208 85 
345 80 
302 46 

1,804 19 
116 62 



[Oct. 
$30,363 18 

16,173 87 



1,721 57 



1,587 97 



6,766 07 



3,502 24 



?2, 



92 $60,114 90 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



Amounts brought forward, . 



$2, 



92 $6«\114 90 



Horses , 

Cows, 

Other live stock, . 
Labor (not on pay roll), . 

Rent, 

Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, express, and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, . 

Gratuities 

Hose, etc., 

Labor (not on pay roll), . 
Medicines and hospital supplies, 

Postage, 

Printing and printing supplies, 
Return of runaways, 
Soap and laundry supplies, 
Stationery and office supplies, . 
School books and supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, . 

Tobacco, 

Water, 

Sundries, 



175 00 
457 50 
22 443 
97 47 

55 00 
236 05 
205 25 



$26$. 42 
627 12 

837 09 
33 35 
4 10 
115 39 
1,833 42 
1,724 08 
189 53 
71 03 
11 67 
7C0 61 
250 94 
20 
479 85 
208 23 
257 37 
600 00 
157 46 



Total current expenses, 
Other expenses on special appropriations, 
Paid State Treasurer, .... 
Paid on account of patients, 

Total expenditures, .... 
Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1902, . 

PvESOURCE: 

Cash on hand.* 

Bills receivable for board, 

Other bills receivable, .... 

Unexpended appropriations available, . 



fll,064 89 
15,349 41 
104 40 
41,391 14 



4/26 59 



-.369 86 

|72£U 35 

34,237 34 

22,866 87 

13 99 

11,064 89 

$140,694 44 



$67,909 84 



* There is in the treasurer's hands, not included in this amount, the following 
sums : — 

Money belonging to patients §614 51 

Money belonging to nurses' training sob >:•'. 15 $4 

$530 35 



28 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1902. 



Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, $2,744 91 

Miscellaneous bills, 3,329 18 

Bills on account of special appropriations, . 2,439 35 



Dividing the total current expenditures ($72,511.35) by the 
average number of patients (322.63) shows an annual cost 
per patient of 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of .... 



$8,513 44 
$59,396 40 



$224 75 + 
4 31 + 



Statement of Appropriations. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 


Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
this Year. 


Balance 
Available. 


Cottage for patients, .... 


$10,000 


00 


$8,931 14 


$1,068 


86 




Infirmary building 


75,000 


00 


66,126 12 


8,873 


88 






25,000 


00 


24,446 37 


553 


63 




Current expense, 1901, 


15,000 


00 


12,080 04 


2,919 


96 




Laundry building and machinery, . 


9,500 


00 


1,855 32 


5,074 


97 


$2,569 71 


Furnishing new buildings, 


20,000 


00 


2,406 57 


17,485 


16 


108 27 




1,000 


00 


106 00 


894 


00 




Electric building and machinery, . 


19,000 


00 




279 


71 


18,720 29 


Nurses' home 


20,000 


00 




7 


13 


19,992 87 




$194,500 


00 


$115,951 56 


$37,157 30 


$41,391 14 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 

The undersigned certifies that he has compared the amount received for board and 
care of patients for the year ending Sept. 30, 1902 ($45,680.61), with the estimated 
earnings of the hospital for the year, and finds them to agree, after allowing for six 
months' board of State patients and unpaid bills. He finds vouchers and copies of 
vouchers for disbursements for current expenses to the amount of $72,511.35. The 
footings of the cash book have been verified, and show a balance in the hands of the 
treasurer on Sept. 30, 1902, of $11,595.24, as follows : — 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, . ..... $10,27161 

Cash vouchers, payments not entered, , 1,263 26 

Cash in safe at hospital, 60 37 

$11,595 24 



Oct. 20, 1902. 



GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Auditor o f Accounts. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



32 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 









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1902.] 



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34 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



S. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases admitted. 




INSANE. 






SANE. 






TOTALS. 




NUMBER OF THE 
ADMISSION. 










































■ 






■ 






■ 










09 


■I 


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"3 


CO 




V 






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3 




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1 




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1 




1 


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55 


48 


103 


34 


23 


57 


89 


71 


160 


Second, .... 


7 


4 


11 


4 


1 


5 


11 


5 


16 


Third, .... 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


Total of cases, . 


63 


52 


115 


39 


26 


65 


102 


78 


180 


Total of persons, 


63 


52 


115 


38 


25 


63 


101 


77 


178 



4. — Relations to Hospitals of Cases admitted. 





Insane. 


Sank. 


TOTAI.8. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


"3 


Inmates of this hospital only, 


8 


4 


12 


32 


23 


55 




40 


27 


67 


Former inmates of this hospital only, . 


3 


3 


6 


5 


3 


8 




8 


6 


14 


Former inmates of this and other hos- 






















Former inmates of other hospitals : — 


5 


1 


6 










5 


I 


6 






















Boston and Taunton insane hospitals, . 


1 




1 










1 




1 


Danvers Insane Hospital, 


8 


12 


20 










8 


12 


20 


Danvers and Westborough insane hos- 


























1 


1 












1 


1 


Hospital Cottages for Children, 








2 




2 




2 




2 


Hospital Cottages for Children and 






















Worcester Insane Hospital, 


1 




1 










1 




1 


Mass. School for the Feeble-minded 






















and Worcester Insane Hospital, 


1 




1 










1 




1 


Northampton Insane Hospital, 


10 


5 


15 










10 


5 


15 


Taunton Insane Hospital, 


9 


9 


18 










9 


9 


18 


Taunton and Westborough insane hos- 






















1 


1 


2 










1 


1 


2 


Taunton and Worcester insane hos- 


















pitals, 

Westborough Insane Hospital, 


1 




1 










1 




1 


7 


7 


14 










7 


7 


14 


Worcester Insane Hospital, . 


7 


7 


14 










7 


7 


14 


Worcester and Northampton insane 
























1 


1 












1 


1 


Worcester and Westborough insane 




















1 


1 


2 










1 


1 


2 


Total of persons, .... 


63 
63 


52 
52 


115 
115 


39 

38 


26 
25 


65 
63 


102 
101 


78 
77 


180 
178 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 35 







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36 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 









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CO 


CO 
t- 




Hi 

•< 

o 




CO 


ao 
t- 




H 






00 


00 


1 




HOOHN 1 NHHWN 1 CS 


f: 


3TAL 


•< 

a 


•BiaqjBjj 


— 1 1 1 MrtH-f) 1 <N 




Eh 




•B^aanM 


ll-Hrt IflrtPlHH 1 1 








•8J3qiop^ 


^- © i~i h h e* cm i i -»r i~i t- 


o 




S 
hi 

a 


•Bjaqjsj 


i-i i-H r-l t-H -f r-l 1 i — ■ — . " 


© 






•HinaiiB jt 


1 NHHrt 1 i-l 1 1 e» 


o 




oo 


•sjsqioj? 


HMH^HrtOHNIN I m 1 CO 




3 

a 

o 


•BjaqjB.j 


i-l 1 H H i-l 1 <M 1 H 1 CO 




E< 




ICS IHH IHHHH 1 1 1 CO 




oo 
H 


•sjaqjoj^ 


llfHH | 1 HHNrt 1 1 


■a 

CN 


Sank 


□ 
ft 


ejaqiBj 


1 1 1 1 IHH IH 1 1 


O 
<M 


H 
h 




1 C4 1 1 1 1 H i-c 1 f— 1 I 1 


<N 




00 


•fljaqiojv 


— O 1 HlH-H | | 1-1 | H 


00 ' 

co 




to 

s 


•Bi»q»B,j 


r-iOlr-c — <NI 1 1 H | H 


CO 

co 






•sjaanBj 


| i-l | i- ,-< | | | HH 1 1 


CO 

eo 




00 


•sjaqiOK 


HCMn 1 CO i-l 1 i-l rl 00 


lO 




TOTAL 


•sjaqiB^jj 


-»H 1 | Tf i-l |HfH» 


lO 






•BjaanBd 


1 HNH 1 «H 1 HH IN 




H 

to 


a 
H 


•Bjaqiojj 


H-C 1 H | CM 1 1 HH 1 


1© 


•< 

00 

to 


•« 
ft 


•8iaqiB,a 


HO 1 1 1 N 1 | »H — 1 CM 


<M 
i© 




H 

Ex 


•BiaapBj 


llOHM m 1 IH| | | 


■M 

•rs 




00 


•sjaqjojv 


|l»H| IHHI 1 CO H «3 


eo 

CO 




a 


•BjaqiBj 


1 ®H 1 IRH I 1 CO —i 


s 








1 CO H I I I H | 1 H I CM I CO 




1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



37 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 



COUNTIES. 


Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Berkshire, 


3 


2 


5 




1 


1 


3 


3 


6 


Bristol, .... 


K 
O 


A 


q 


o 


Q 
O 


Q 
O 


10 


7 


17 


Essex, .... 


6 


5 


U 


3 


5 


8 


9 


10 


19 


Franklin, 


2 


1 


3 


3 




3 


5 


1 


6 


Hampden, 


3 


4 


7 


4 


2 


6 


7 


6 


13 


Hampshire, . 


7 


1 


8 








7 


1 


8 


Middlesex, . 


11 


13 


24 


8 


3 


11 


19 


16 


35 


Norfolk, 


2 


5 


7 


1 


3 


4 


3 


8 


11 


Plymouth, 


4 


1 


5 








4 


1 


5 


Suffolk 


15 


9 


24 


6 


7 


13 


21 


16 


37 


Worcester, . 


5 


6 


11 


8 


1 


9 


13 


7 


20 


Totals, . 


63 


52 


115 


38 


25 


63 


101 


77 


178 



38 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Totals. 


Tot. 




ei 
fa 


00 Tf 1 <N <N 
T 1 O O 


es 


lO 1 — - 


Divorced. 


Tot. 


1 1 1 1 1 


i 
fa 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


Ma. 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


Widowed. 


Tot. 


00 1 1 00 00 


Fe. 


eo I l co co 


Ma. 


U5 1 1 U3 ITS 


Q 
« 

2 

M 
•< 
2 


Tot. 


OHH 

IM 


!M CN 
<M CN 


9 
fa 


O rH | 


i— I i— 1 
rH rH 


Ma. 


O | rH 





- = T3 

— s; -a 
faccH 



5 2 

o o 



fr— lO CO 

in 


u"i CO 

1 eo co 


WHN 


cc US 
1 "N CN 


CO 


OS 00 

1 eo co 


1 1 1 1 t 1 


1 1 1 1 1 I 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


OH 1 


t- «o 


rH 1 1 




iO rH I 


CO lO 




00 t- 


CNrHC 


CM <N 


O CO rH 


CO CO 
CO CO 




co" 




. a 

cc O 




v « 




8 P< 




C» — 
O O 


First, . 
Second, 
Third, . 


Tota 
Tota 



rJ 



I o 
d co 



es a 
a -a ^ ch 

fatXJ^i 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



39 



8. — Occupations of Persons admitted. 

MALE3. 



Carpenter, . 
Carriage painters 
Clerks, 
Cutler, 
Druggist, . 
Dye runner, 
Farmers, 
Galvanizer, 
Gardener, . 
Hotel proprietor 
Journalist, . 
Laborers, . 
Machinists, . 
Merchant, . 
Operatives, 
Paper hanger, 



12 



1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

14 
2 
1 
4 
1 



Painter, . 

Plumber, ... 1 

Printers, ... 2 

Rattan worker, . 1 
Real estate agent, 

Sailors, ... 2 

Sea captain, . . 1 

Shipping clerk, . - 1 
Shoemakers, ..21 

Student, ... - 1 
Teamsters, ..12 

Tanner, . . 1 

Unknown, . . 25 19 

Totals, . . 63 38 101 



FEMALES. 



5 


1 


6 


1 




1 


21 


11 


32 


52 


25 


77 



Domestics, . 
Housekeepers, 
Housewives, 
Nurse maid, 
Operatives, 
Postal clerk, 



7 


7 


14 


5 


1 


6 


8 


1 


9 


1 




1 


3 


4 


7 


1 




1 



Seamstresses, 
Teacher, . 
Unknown, 

Totals, 



DAUGHTER OR WIFE OF — 



Blacksmith, 




1 


1 


Manufacturers, 


2 




2 


Bleacher, . 


1 




1 


Merchants, 


2 




2 


Bookkeeper, 


1 




1 


Miner, 


1 




1 


Carpenters, 


2 


1 


3 


Painter, . 


1 




1 


Clerk,. 


1 




1 


Real estate agent, . 




1 


1 


Farmers, 


2 




2 


Shipping clerk, 


1 




1 


Florist, 




1 


1 


Tailors, . 


2 


1 


3 


Insurance agent, 
Jeweller, . 




1 


1 
1 










1 




Totals, 


20 


9 


29 


Laborers, . 


3 


3 


6 











HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Probable Causes of Disease in Persons admitted. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


















Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




F6IHfll68. 






Alcohol, 


5 


2 


7 


- 


- 


- 


7 
f 


Compression of head 
during birth, . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Congenital, 


6 


2 


8 


2 


- 


2 


1 


Dissipation, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


o 

6 


Exposure, . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Fractured skull, . 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Fright, 


_ 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


a 

D 


rngot oi moinci uy- 
fore birth, 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


2 


General debility, 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Heredity, . 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


Indigestion, 


2 


- 


2 


- ■ 


— 


- 


2 


Intestinal worms, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


La grippe, . 


- . 


- 




- 


1 


1 


1 


Malaria, 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


2 


Masturbation, . 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


2 


Menstruation, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


Overeating, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


2 


Overwork, . 


5 


2 


7 


1 


- 


1 


8 


Scarlet-fever, 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 


4 


Shock, 




2 


2 


- 


1 


1 


3 


Sunstroke, . 


4 




4 


1 




1 


5 


Teething, . 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


4 


Tobacco, . 


2 




2 








2 


Trauma, 


7 


10 


17 


6 


3 


9 


26 


Typhoid fever, . 








1 




1 


1 


Unknown, . 


23 


28 


51 


16 


11 


27 


78 


Totals, 


63 


52 


115 


38 


25 


63 


178 



* Assigned causes. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 





CO 


O 


00 






CM 


CO 


1 CO 




"5 


00 


*■"* 








CO 


CO 






































09 




















• 
















it 




CO 


<^> 


CM 








1 


9 




t>- 










«o 




H 
M 


| 
















O 
9 






































S 




CO 


*o 




co 




1 CJ5 
















c~» 






CS 












































CO 


o 


CO 


1 CM 




3 


to 


1— ( 








CO 


CM 




O 


















H 


















CO 










— H 


CO 


1 CO 




aj 


CM 














02 


(.'III 




































CO 


Ci 






CM 




CO 


1 




o 


CO 










CM 






» 


















* 

















iO CM CM CM CM | i—i 



CM CO 



I I CO I CO 



O 
> 

2 
s 

be 



73 

o 
!> 
O 

u 

Oh 

a 



o 
'a 

u 

a> 

S 

3 

5z; 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 





B 


Totals. 


| HHCNHWCMHHHH 1 


r-i 




36.43 




1MB OF DEJ 


Females. 


| Hr , ,_ , | | CM 1— 1 | 1—1 | | 






33.21 


a 

H 

S 
■ 


H 
H 
«< 


Males. 


I | | hhcci i i t— i i i— i i 






co 

Ci 
CO 


Pkrson 


M 

W 


Totals. 








12.88 




FIRST ATTA 


Females. 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
1 !>• 1 1 1 1 1 » 1 I 1 1 






«o 
t> 




H 
•< 


■ 

09 
«3 


H H | r-l | | | i—l | | i— 1 




t> 


19.7 




6 
3 


Totals. 


1 CO CO O CM CM CO CO CO CO CM I 

HCNr-H CM f—l 




'O 

f-H 


36.3 




EN ADMITT 


Females. 


1 C£P l>» ^T" 5 — ? V~ I—* [ 






35.04 


ADMITTED. 


a 


Males. 




CO 
CO 


CO 

co 


37.34 


Persons 


M 

D 


Totals. 


est - — cocococC'^cocO'-^ lt> 




*Q 


18.61 




FIRST ATT/ 


Females. 


GM'OCOGM-^iOCMt— 'CM I I CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


17.15 




Eh 
■< 


Males. 


CM t> ^ CO CM iO r*< | 
CM 


CO 
CO 


CO 

co 


19.83 


















AGES. 




Congenital, 

15 years and less, . 

From 15 to 20 years, 
20 to 25 years, 
25 to 30 years, 
30 to 35 years, 
35 to 40 years, 
40 to 50 years, 
50 to 60 years, 
60 to 70 years, 
70 to 80 years, 

Unknown, 


Total of cases, . 


Total of persons, 


Mean ages, 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — N< 



o. 62. 



i 



1 1 | | | CO | H | | 


GO 
t- 

to 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH 1 1 1 1 


r-t r-t iC 
T 


i I -h r i i <m i — i i i 


CO CO Tfi 

CO 


IM |h | 1 — 1 1 | |<M 


fc»» fc* *Q 

CO 


1 1 1 — 1 1 ) 1 1 1 1 1 


rH rH O 

CM 
CM 


ICOII||rH||||GM 


CO CO iO 


1 (OWMO^NCOCOh | I 

CM T— < 


wO 

iO CO CO 
CO CO * 
iO 
CM 




GO 

CO *o o 

CO 
CM 




Oi CO CO 
CO CO 

CM 


(N H tJ< CO (M <N 1 i-i 1 CM 


rH 

kO CO ^ 
co co • 

CO 
rH 


HtOCOHNH 1 | | | 1 CM 


OS 

to »o CO 
CM CM ■ 

rH 


CO CO rH 1 <M CM CM <M 1 rH I 1 
CM 


K5 

Ol 00 -f 
CO CO 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, .... 
From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years, 

70 to 80 years, 
Unknown, 

Total of cases, .... 
Mean ages, .... 



44 



HOSPIT 



AL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



~4 ~ lO 

<M (M 

co 

CO 



I HHH I |<M(MI-h| I 



| I NfNrHCO I W H H H | 



— NHHH |H |- 1 \ I CO 



CO 

— < ~ CO 

CM CN 



I t» I i— • I I I I 



I I I GO 00 CO 



— O ^ I H I i—l I •— I 



CO CO iO 



to 

© oo 

.-I 1-H (M 

CO 



lO 

00 t>. o 



o o 

»— t i— < CO 

CO 



OS 

© GO CO 

QO 

t-i CO 



CO— ' O CO O (N H (N I I iO 



co r>» co 



— p »o o »o O O O O O O & § 

^^(NWCC^^CONCO ^ ^ v 

— rcooooooooo o O CS 

8,3 a § 5 £ s 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



45 



■9R01 



C* CO t- 



e» o -n 



w ^ w 



i-l «o C4 



rl O iH 



« r-H 



i-H O © O 



z 

- c - < 

i X Z 3 

g 2 ^ E 

b 9 O ■ 

c - £ 



•31*nox 



«o t— © 



C<1 « !M 



l-l I-H tD 



e» o ^ 



5 i 8IB10.L 
V r. Z H 

si 



tj> :M r-< 



5 £ 



r- D 
- Q 



af 

"S a b t: 
o o o g 
S S S >, 

CC SO CM Cfl 



>>>>>, 



o o o o o o o 



46 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Totals. 


•8IBJOX 


co 1-1 h~ co cm 

CM 


* 

co o 
co co 




CM <M 1 Cl CO CM 


30 CO 
30 CM 


■831BW 


— i CN i-H 00 CO 1 


CO CO 


d 
h 

£ 


•81B»0X 


CO t-I | CO 1 i-l 


CM CM 




t — 1 1 11^ 


00 00 


•83IBK 


CO i-l 1 CO 1 1 


CO CO 


Not improved. 


•SIBJOX 


CO I 1 «5 ^ 1 


CM CM 




i-< 1 1 <M CM I 


•o o 


•83IBK 


CM 1 1 CO CM 1 




Improved. 


•8IBJOX 


t> CO i-H UO CM r-4 
l-H 


CJi r GO 

CM CM 


•83IB013J 


^ CM 1 l>- i-l tH 


«o 

i— i i— i 


•89IBW 


CO 1— 1 r- ( 00 i-l 1 




Much improved. 


•»IB}0£ 


lit i-l I 1 


i-i i—i 


•saiBtnaj 


III III 


1 1 


•83I«K 


III l-H i | 


i-H i— 1 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


A. — Insane epileptics : — 
First, .... 
Second,. 

Third, .... 

B. — Sane epileptics : — 

First, .... 

Second, .... 

Third 

Total of cases, 
Total of persons, . 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 62. 



47 



15. — Causes of Death. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


CO 

« 


Females. 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 




















Exhaustion from epilepsy, 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


l 


3 


4 


Status epilepticus, . 


4 


1 


5 


2 




2 


6 


1 


7 


Cerebral thrombosis, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Cerebro-spinal sclerosis, . 


— 


— 


- 


1 


— 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Genito-urinary system : — 




















Chronic nephritis, 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Respiratory system : — 




















Broncho-pneumonia, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Pneumonia, 








1 




1 


1 




1 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 




3 


3 










3 


3 


General : — 




















Asphyxia during an attack 
of epilepsy, . 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Cirrhosis of liver, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Totals, 


7 


7 


14 


6 


1 


7 


13 


8 


21 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



All Attacks. 


WHOLK KNOWN PERIOD OF 
HOSPITAL HKSIDENCK. 


•8IBJOX 


| |H 1 Hri OS i-l i- 1 1 


14 

277.71 




1 1 1 1 rH ~ 1 iH • 1 


7 

246.85 


•S3|BK 


1 1 »H 1 I l>OH I | | 


CO 

o 

CO 


WHOLE KNOWN PERIOD OF 
DISEASE. 




| | | I I I 1 COHOSH 


14 
242.28 


•S3IBIU9J 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <N «-h 1 


7 

253.14 


•89IBJV; 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iH I iC rH 


241.42 


Last Attack. 


WHOLE DURATION OF 
ATTACK. 


•S[BJOX 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO «-> OS t- 


-f CM 
r-t -f 

CN 




1 1 I 1 1 1 1 NH ^ | 


7 

253 . 14 




1 I 1 1 1 I 1 1 »Oi-i 


230.85 


HOSPITAL RESIDENCE. 


•SIBIOJ, 


1 1 rH 1 1-H O rH 1 | | 


CO 
CO 


•S9IBOI9J 


I I I | f-i^i iO 1 1 1 I 


CM 

OS 
CN 


•88!BJ\T 


1 1 lH | | | «0 — 1 1 1 


CO 

co 


DURATION BEFORE 
ADMISSION. 


SIBJOX 


1 t I I i h i niMNH 


14 

208.28 


•s9[Btnaj[ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 1 -Hi 1 


CN 
CM 
CN 


•83IBJ\[ 


1 1 1 1 1 i-i 1 1 CN CO rH 


7 

192.85 


PERIOD. 


Epileptic : — 

Congenital, .... 

Under 1 month, . 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, . 
Unknown, .... 

Totals, . . . . 

Average in months, 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



— Xo. 62. 



49 



1 1 Hr^rHWH | | I | 




1 1 i 1 1 1 FH 1 1 1 1 


rH CO 


1 IHHHCO 1 | I I | 


CO CO 


1 I I I 1 rH | (MWH | 


CM 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 • 1 rH | 


rH -HH 

CM 


1 1 1 1 1 rH | CM CO 1 | 


•O 

co t> 
l> 

OS 


1 1 1 1 1 H | (NMH | 


CM 


1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 r-4 | 


rH 

CM 


I 1 i I 1 I rvi rr\ I I 
1 1 1 i 1 1 vJ 1 1 


CO 

OS 


1 1 HHHHW 1 I 1 I 


co 

rH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 rH | | I | 


rn CO 


1 I — i— — i—i '^1 1 t I | 


co co 


1 | | | rH | | CO CO 1 I 


t- H 
rH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! i-l 1 1 


rH CO 

Oi 
rH 


1 1 1 1 rH | | CO <M 1 1 


CO O 

CO 


• 

Epileptic : — 
Congenital, 
Under 1 month, 
From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 
Over 20 years, . 
Unknown, .... 

Totals, .... 

Average in months, 



50 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1902. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 



Year ending September 30, 1903. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1904. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS W** 

Hospital foe Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) 



Year ending September 30, 1903. 




El^ BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1904. 

\ 



70' 



Mum 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



1903 
3 

CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, 5 

Trustees' Report, 7 

Report of Superintendent, 11 

Admissions and Discharges, .... 11 

Training School 14 

Extra Work, 14 

Gifts, 20 

Patients employed, 20 

Amusements, 21 

Schools, . 22 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room 23 

Articles made and repaired in the Wards, 24 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Rooms, 25 

Farm Products, 26 

List of Persons regularly employed, 28 

General Information, 29 

Treasurer's Report, 30 

Statistical Tables, 37 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 



WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, . . . Boston. 

CHARLES A. CLOTJGH, Secretary, Groton. 

ADELAIDE A. CALKINS, ...... Springfield. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Brookline. 

HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., Lenox. 

WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D., Dalton. 

WINFORD N. CALDWELL, Springfield. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

EVEKETT FLOOD, M.D., Superintendent. 

ARTHUR 0. MORTON, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

RANSOM A. GREENE, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

LILLIAN M. KINCAID, Clerk. 

MARY W. WENTWORTH, Stenographer. 

CHARLES F. SIMONDS, . . . . . . . Steward and Storekeeper. 

GEORGE E. BATES Engineer. 

J. W. WILLIAMS, Farmer. 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 



TREASURER. 

Palmer. 

Office at the Hospital. 



Commonbxraltjr of iiassatfwsttis. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics 
respectfully submit the following report. 

The work of the hospital has gone on quietly during the 
past year, and we are able to report a steady advance both in 
the amount of property held by us and in our capabilities to 
care for the inmates placed in our charge. 

There has been no change in the membership of the trustees, 
Dr. Henry P. Jaques having been, at the expiration of his 
term of service, reappointed by the Governor and his reap- 
pointment confirmed by the Council. 

In view of the increasing number of inmates and the weight 
of the duties falling on the present officers, it was voted by 
your Board to appoint Dr. Ransom A. Greene, a graduate of 
the Baltimore Medical College, as assistant physician. Other 
than this, no changes have occurred in the medical staff. 

Several new buildings have been completed during the past 
year, and are now wholly or partially in use. The nurses' 
home, which a year ago was in process of construction, has 
now been finished and furnished, and the nurses have taken up 
their rooms there. This building has 40 single rooms, — a 
sufficient supply for our nurses for some years. 

The new laundry building is a large, one-story brick struc- 
ture, 120 feet long by 60 feet wide, giving -ample facilities for 
the present work and for growth. This also has been com- 
pleted during the past year. The machines in it are nearly all 
in place, and work is now going on there. 

The third building built and completed during the past year 
is the electric power house, which is directly connected with 
the old boiler house, and affords us the necessary room for our 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



dynamo and engines. It seems to be well constructed and 
adapted to our needs, and should afford the space required for 
all the machinery requisite for power and the lighting of the 
present groups of buildings, and for future extensions. 

In addition to the completion and furnishing of these build- 
ings, we have been enabled, through the wise permission of 
the Legislature, to purchase an adjoining farm of 300 acres, 
with a good brick house and several barns. On this land on 
the hillside opposite the existing buildings we have been au- 
thorized to erect two suitable buildings, to contain 60 patients, 
and these are, with the brick building and barns already ex- 
isting, to form a farm group. These new buildings are now 
in process of erection, the foundations have been made, and 
the framework is nearly complete. 

The great advantage to the institution in being thus enabled 
to separate the farm workers, both the hired and the patients, 
from the rest of the inmates, is readily apparent to all those 
cognizant of the existing conditions ; and these buildings will, 
it is hoped, afford us some relief from the overcrowding which 
constantly threatens us. 

The number of patients in the hospital Oct. 1, 1902, was 
377 ; on Oct. 1, 1903, it was 422, — an increase of about 12 
per cent. As a result of this, the institution is beginning to 
be overcrowded ; 50 patients are now obliged to sleep on 
movable beds made up in corridors and day rooms. 

The trustees desire to enter here a firm protest against the 
system of overcrowding which has obtained at times in our in- 
stitutions, and which is directly injurious both to the discip- 
line and the health of the patients. Proper accommodations 
should be provided, or patients should not be admitted. We 
hope, however, that any overcrowding with us may be avoided 
within a short period. 

It is a matter of both interest and importance that the amount 
of work which the institution has done for itself, either through 
its regular employees or through the aid of the patients, should 
be realized. The regular work in the industrial room, in the 
shops, the kitchen, the bakery and the laundry has continued 
through the year. In addition, a considerable amount of grad- 
ing, trenching, gardening, pipe laving and general farm work 
has to be accomplished by the patients. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



More especially would we mention that a considerable amount 
of work on the buildings has been accomplished by our own 
forces. At the nurses' home, the concreting in the basement, 
the outside stairs, the arrangement of the furniture, the clean- 
ing of the rooms and the making of the bedding and curtains 
has thus been done. A large amount of filling, grading and 
painting in the construction of the laundry building was done 
by the patients, while the supervision and main portion of the 
work was attended to by our regular employees. In the neces- 
sary work of moving machinery and changing pipes, in con- 
nection with the electric building, our hired employees have 
been much aided by willing patients. 

It seems scarcely necessary to again repeat and lay stress on 
what has been so often mentioned, — the great advantage of 
regular work to the patients themselves . It is one of the most 
important items in their treatment, wholly apart from any 
usefulness or advantage to any one else from such work. 

The farm has gone on satisfactorily during the past year. 
The amount of produce has been good, and in some respects 
exceeded reasonable expectation. Some new machines have 
been added for farm work, motors installed instead of engines 
for ensilage, etc., so that we now have the complete machinery 
required for the farm work. Some important additions have 
been made also to the stock, which are now housed in the 
barns recently purchased. 

We have enlarged and improved the work at the greenhouse, 
devoting special attention to the use of the plant for the pur- 
poses of vegetable gardening, though the cultivation of plants 
and flowers for the wards is not wholly neglected. 

Added facilities for medical treatment have been provided, 
and the efforts of the officers in this direction have been much 
appreciated by the patients. A considerable amount of valuable 
work outside the routine has been accomplished, and certain 
results have been printed. The titles of the articles will be 
found in the superintendent's report. 

The expenses of the institution have been increased this } r ear 
by the high price of coal ; for, although through the foresight 
of the superintendent most of our hard coal was contracted for 
before the rise in price, there was some necessity for buying 
soft coal, and the indirect effects were considerable. 



10 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



The prices of building also rose much during the year, so 
that at one time it seemed questionable whether we could 
place our contracts within the limits of the appropriations, but 
we finally succeeded in making proper arrangements. 

At various times during the past two years it has been 
brought to the attention of members of the Board that no 
adequate provision is made for the large number of epileptic 
children now in the State. After prolonged thought, this 
matter has been placed in the hands of a committee of the 
trustees, in order that it may be carefully considered from all 
sides. It seems probable, however, that it will be deemed 
advisable that this institution should make provision for 
epileptic children, and in this case, steps will be taken in 
this direction in the near future. This is a subject of the 
most serious importance, and your special attention is now 
directed to it. 

In reirard to the work for the comms year, it has been 
felt by your Board to be wisest, after a most careful con- 
sideration of existing conditions, not to request any large 
appropriation this year beyond the ordinary one required for 
the current expenses of the hospital. The amount of work 
done during the past year has taxed our officers heavily, and 
it has seemed best to your Board that during the year to follow 
we should devote ourselves chiefly to the completion and per- 
fection of the work already on hand. For this reason the Board 
make no request for any large appropriation for new under- 
takings. 

We do desire, however, to have a sum to use for certain 
small changes and arrangements which have become necessary 
by reason of our increased development. These purposes are : 
the removal of our ice house to a new site : an addition to the 
greenhouse ; removing several old buildings to better positions : 
tearing down certain useless buildings, and such other objects 
as may be required for the benefit of the farm or the patients. 
We therefore petition the Legislature for the appropriation of 
$10,000 to be expended for the purposes above mentioned. 

CHAS. A. CLOUGH, 
WILLIAM K BULLARD, 

For the Trustees. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



1 1 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 
The following report is respectfully submitted : — 



Number of patients Sept. 30, 1902 377 

Since admitted : — 

Sane (2 from visit, 1 from escape), 103 

Insane, 29 

Discharged and on visit : — 

Sane. — Much improved, ...... 2 

Improved, 37 

Not improved, .4 

Died,. . 6 

On visit, 12 

Escaped, 1 

62 

Insane. — Much improved, 2 

Improved, 3 

Not improved, 4 

Died, . . 11 

On visit, 5 

25 

Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1903, .... 422 

Daily average of patients, 409.53 

Per capita cost (per week), $4.55 



To one going about from day to day among our patients, 
certain needs become more and more apparent. Many condi- 
tions are met by the ingenuity of the persons most intimately 
interested, and often methods thus adopted are not only 
efficient, but prove the best possible. In many cases, however, 
the need becomes more pressing the oftener it is encountered, 
and after much patient and laborious investigation and con- 
sultation a few things become prominent as the ones we should 
try to obtain first. 



L2 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



To find fault with the equipment is fortunately in Massachu- 
setts not as often necessary as one would suppose it to be in 
some other States, judging from the printed reports. Of 
course we may find that equipment is inadequate, and the 
buildings not just as we would design them if starting out on 
the same problem a second time ; but in the main we are for- 
tunate in having buildings located manifestly to our advantage, 
water supply of ample capacity, sewage disposal equal to all 
possible growth for many years, heat and light intelligently 
arranged with capacity for unlimited expansion, cooking and 
dining room facilities either already fully large enough or so 
planned that additions can be made when conditions require it 
without in any way disturbing the original plan, a general 
large outlook for classification which we can use comfortably 
now or in the future, area of land large enough for the present 
and properly placed to allow of separation of sexes and varying 
groups divided in accordance with their ages, and a segrega- 
tion of buildings which is proving, to our satisfaction, its 
entire wisdom. 

The plan, as outlined in the former report, has been carried 
out in several lines, and I recommend the balance of the list 
of last year as in my opinion requiring attention in the near 
future. This comprises a general employees' dining room ; a 
cold storage plant ; asylum buildings for both sexes ; a labora- 
tory building, and balconies on two of the present buildings. 

The uses made of appropriations have been fully described 
in the treasurer's report, and need no further comment. 

It may be wise to postpone action on these recommendations 
of last year at least for this season. The ultimate plan will 
thus become more specific. 

The work for the coming season seems to be in the line of 
completing what has already been begun, and of caring for a 
large number of minor matters. 

^Yith these many advantages and the prospective progress, 
I consider that we have cause for encouragement and little 
reason for finding fault with our equipment ; but to be fully 
satisfied with our success would be unwarranted. 

The extreme difficulty of dealing with epileptic people is 
daily exemplified. Even the naturally mild-tempered and 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



those with forgiving dispositions, under the stress of the dis- 
orders which have epilepsy for a symptom, are at times so irri- 
table that the nurse and fellow worker must exercise almost 
superhuman tact and patience in order to avoid aggravating 
the condition. 

Concrete examples would be interesting, hut are not cited, 
as being unnecessary in this report. 

These patients all look upon themselves as invalids, and have 
been taught from childhood that they should not work. When 
we find a poor hemiplegic, who suffers pain and dizziness or a 
seizure every time he makes an effort to use the affected side 
in even a slight degree, we cannot help fully agreeing that he 
should be taken at his own value. The incompetency of such 
workers cannot be questioned, and the inefficiency of epileptic 
workers in general is often equally evident, though the 
majority are greatly benefited by the effort they need to make 
to keep at regular daily moderate labor. 

The discipline which is obtained by these patients from asso- 
ciating with each other, from careful and often-repeated injunc- 
tions, from the example of forbearance which all employees are 
expected to exhibit, and from being to a degree voluntarily 
under orders, is of marked and lasting value. 

The fact that recoveries are not recorded need not affect the 
hopefulness of our work. We have to consider that nearly 
every case with us has been to some degree benefited, some 
remarkably so, and that they are all of a severe type. 

The worker in every place, even the humblest, is important 
here, because he may be the one who sets an example of forbear- 
ance towards the patients, of loyalty and contentment. One 
cheerful, willing worker, who is glad he is able to work, and 
is not rather looking for a minute to shirk responsibility, can 
influence in a large degree the whole administration of an in- 
stitution. My thanks and the gratitude of your Board are due 
to all such persons, in whatever station they are employed. 

The training school has carried on its work with great 
success. We consider the leno-thening of the course to three 
years of distinct advantage. 

We have felt the need of coming more in touch with the 
recent arrivals, who have not had time to get any of the 



14 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



training school work, and with the night nurses, who cannot 
always arrange to attend the lectures and recitations, and have 
instituted a sort of vacation training school, which calls these 
people together at suitable times when the other school is not 
in session, and gives instructions in the most essential points. 
The list of graduates is given below : — 

List of Graduates, Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics, Training 
School for Nurses, 1903. 
Casey, Marguerite J. Nute, Georgie A. 

Daley, Catherine M. Flint, George J. 

The medical work, dental work, work on dietary, hot air 
and other treatments are sufficiently noted in the list of work 
appended. 

As a matter of record, it seems wise to briefly enumerate the 
extra work done during the year in the several departments, 
though it is not possible to adequately present in a written 
record all the varied and varying details of the industrial 
department, the grading, road making, gardening, farm work, 
etc. 

Steward's Department. — Fish box and sink put into use in 
store cellar. Men's kitchen incorporated into K. B. Food 
cart put into use. Food carriers employed. 

Painter's Department. — Women's building outside. Green- 
house outside twice. Infirmary inside. Kitchen of K. B. 
inside. G. cottage inside. Store building outside. Cow 
' barn outside. Horse barn outside. Porches of I. C. M. and 
M. cottage outside. Veranda of K. B. outside. New laundry 
outside and inside. Tin roofs of men's and Avomen's buildings. 
Roof of laundry. Window sashes in carpenter's shop and 
boiler house. Employees' cottage outside. Men's building 
inside. Stenographer's office. 

Stenographer. — Moving into office: furniture, patients' 
letters, supplies, letter file, patients' valuables. Classifying 
and renumbering pamphlets on file. Classifying, extending 
and renumbering letter file. Indexing and arranging keys for 
nurses' home. Indexing and arranging keys for brick house. 

Gardener's Department. — Building chimney. Grading 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



around building. New furnace. New foundations. Catch- 
basin. New beds for cucumbers. Setting out strawberry 
bed. Setting out asparagus. Setting out two hundred trees. 

Engineer's Department. — Refitting hydrants to new hose. 
Posts and rail for ice platform at K. B. Disconnecting three 
old locomotive boilers, and moving them outside of boiler 
house. Disconnecting and moving five feet return tubular 
boiler from old boiler house to new boiler house. Closet and 
bowl in A. B. basement. Moving and piping small refriger- 
ator in A. B. basement. Changing from low to high pressure 
steam line to new laundry. Grading and seeding lawn near 
power house. Removing old brass and iron pipe in old boiler 
house. Piping for bath and toilet room in power house. Lay- 
ing sewer pipe to main from power house. Erecting a line of 
poles to greenhouse, and running wire on same. Circuit of 
wires for incandescent lamps in power house. Wiring for lan- 
tern K. B. hall. Piping supply and waste to sink in store 
basement. Lining sink and ice box in store basement. Put 
in new trap at G. cottage. New lights in refrigerator and 
over stove at K. B. Changing air and gas pipe at power 
house. Three floor drains in infirmary basement. Made over 
awning frames for infirmary piazza. Wiring cabinet, infirmary 
basement. Shower bath, infirmary basement. Xew electric 
lights at M. cottage and men's infirmary. Work on curtains, 
nurses' home. Electric lights, nurses' home. Regulator on 
heater at nurses' home. Floor trap at nurses' home. Drain 
pipe between I. C. M. and laundry building. Lining refrig- 
erator at K. B. Work on engine and generator foundations, 
power house. Work on concrete floor, power house. Water 
pipe for washing carriages at horse barn. Erecting electric 
light poles from power house to horse barn and from horse 
barn to cow barn. Covering steam pipe in cow barn. Wash- 
ing machine, extractor, etc., new laundry. Steam and water 
pipes, new laundry. Work on dry room coils and drying 
rack>. Piping mangle and temporary engine. Laying ten- 
inch tile west of new laundry. Set up heater at Hyde cottage. 
Set up three sinks in infirmary. Putting four closets in in- 
firmary. Steam tables in I. C. M. Laying and connecting- 
water pipe from farm cottage to tub in yard. Heat conduit 



16 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



to nurses' home. Telephone conduit to nurses' home. Heat 
exhaust to new laundry. 

Carpenter's Department. — Laundry, shafting and motors. 
Doors in attic. Yents in. K. B. refrigerator. Screens for in- 
firmary. Chair rail on eight wards. Two hundred and fifty 
picture frames. Two doors, G. cottage. Work in power 
house. Work at brick house. Work in dispensary. Hose 
covers. Food wagon. Dirt wagon. Straw cart. Telephone 
and three screens for administration building. Electric bath. 
Drug room in infirmary. Duck house. School room fitted 
up. Bookcase for nurses' home. Bookcase for H. C. Coal 
trestle. Piazza, employees' cottage. Bread-slicing machine. 
Supply room for painter. Coal bin, K. B. Two flights bank 
steps. Fish box for store. Seven hundred feet moulding for 
electric wire. Thirteen screens for toilet room. Four table 
tops. Cross arms for poles. Laundry floor laid. Two sleds. 
Elevator in root cellar. Register board. Stenographer's office 
fitted up. 

Farmer's Department. — Hauling stone for filling for trestle. 
Digging and filling ditches for water and sewer at nurses' home. 
Removing bank and grading at north side of men's building. 
Grading in front of carrriage house. Repairing highways near 
hospital grounds. Putting in foundation for ice house. Put- 
ting in retaining Avails around Plumley buildings. Supplying 
stone for foundation at greenhouse. Cutting and delivering 
telephone and electric light poles. Hauling stone, sand and 
gravel for the new electrical machinery. Carting boilers, gen- 
erators and engine and loading them on cars. Enlarging and 
diking brook on Plumley place. Opening and extending barn 
cellar drains on Plumley place. Clearing ice pond. Hauling 
gravel for roads and walks around hospital buildings. Haul- 
ing cement, gravel and sand for cement floors in buildings. 
Hauling brick and other material for work about the buildings. 

Marking Doom. — Fitting up 40 rooms at nurses' home. 
Fitting U p four rooms at brick house. Fitting up and moving 
into new laundry. Cutting 217 men's shirts. Cutting 87 
short nightshirts. Cutting 24 long nightshirts. Cutting 10 
nightdresses. Mending table linen from employees' cottage, 
men's building and administration building. Mending clothes 
bags from all buildings. Mending aprons from K. B. and em- 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



ployees' cottage. Mending for Hyde cottage patients. Can- 
ning 65 quarts squash at employees' cottage. Canning 100 
quarts rhubarb at employees" cottage. 

Supervisor of Curses (Women). — Preliminary course for 
new nurses. Gastric lavage. Massage. Electricity. Open- 
ing the nurses' home. Chansons: night nurses from M. cottage 

o coo t o 

to third tloor of nurses' home. Removing bedding from third 
floor of I. W. to be marked for night watch at M. cottage. 

o o 

Changing 13 nurses' rooms to patients' rooms. Changing oper- 
ating room. Sending patients to ride, to Forest Lake and for 
car rides. All new patients admitted have bath and clothes 
disinfected at M. cottage. Physical examination of every new 
patient admitted. 

Supervisor of Xurses (Men) . — Food carried from K. B. 
dining room. Work on trestle at coal shed. Grading in 
front of store, infirmary, I. C. M., M. cottage, nurses 9 home. 
G. cottage and K. B. Catch-basins. Ditches dug and pipe 
laid. Walks and roads made and repaired. 

Articles written. 

Psychology of Epilepsy. 
Types of Mental Disease, etc. 

A Treatment Room for Epilepsy, and Some of its Uses. 
Salt Poor Diet. 
Accidents to Epileptics. 
Sciatica. 

Treatment of the Ordinary Conditions of Epilepsy. 
The Need of Separate Buildings and Separate Rooms for Some 
Cases. 

Treatment of Status Epilepticus. 

Advantages of Epileptics being treated at a Distance from their 
Homes. 

Abstracts on the Pychoses, Dementia Paralytica, Forms of Men- 
tal Disease, Epileptic Insanity. 
For the Training School : — 

Diseases of the Alimentary Canal. 

Rules for Nurses. 

Preliminary Course for Nurses. 

Points on Muscles and Bones. 

Diseases of the Kidney. 

Typhoid Fever. 

Air, Respiration and Ventilation. 



18 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Extra Medical Work. 

1. Eye, ear, nose and throat. 

2. Gynecology. 

3. Minor surgical operations. 

4. Vaccination. 

5. ' Electric bath. 

6. Gastric lavage. 

7. Gastric analysis. 

8. Blood counting. 

9. Blood pressure observations. 

10. Examination of sputum. 

11. X-ray work. 

12. Salt poor diet. 

13. Static electricity. 

14. Cabinet and other treatment room work. 

In addition to extra medical work, moving into the dispen- 
sary, operating room, treatment room, class room, electrical 
room and laboratories and fitting them up, has been an impor- 
tant item in the medical department. 

The fitting up and moving into the stock drug room should 
also be mentioned. 

We have had regular religious services in the assembly room, 
and give below a list of clergymen who have officiated : — 



Rev. Charles Olmstead. 
Rev. N. M. Pratt. 
Rev. Willis A. Moore. 
Rev. F. B. Harrison. 
Rev. E. C. Stover. 
Rev. Fr. Donoghue. 



Rev. Fr. M. L. Boyne. 
Rev. Fr. Carey. 
Rev. M. Oakman Patton. 
Rev. C. W. Williams. 
Prof. C. B. Wilson. 
Rev. Dr. J. S. Lemon. 



The following has been extraordinary outlay during the last 
year, although it has not been classified as such : — 

Outlay for coal (belonging on the previous year's contract), . $977 96 

Outlay for grading,* 473 85 

Boiler, etc., for greenhouse, 540 00 

Ice house, lumber and mason, 532 98 

Removing boilers : — 

Removing, $79 16 

Resetting, 70 00 

149 16 



Amount carried forward, $2,673 95 



* Trestle included in grading. 



1903.~ 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



19 



Amount bought forward, f 2.o73 ?o 

Catch-basins and concrete : — 

Cement, *467 00 

Labor, 577 00 

Tile, 136 00 

1,180 00 

Extra farm help, 5 extra for summer, 400 00 



$4.?o3 95 

This subtracted from current expenses would reduce the per 
capita cost to $4.oo. Subtracting S933. S 1 . the amount re- 
ceived from sales, would reduce the per capita to about $4.31. 



Medical Lectures. 



DA 


TE. 




Szrj-rct. 


19*3. 

Jan. 22, . 


Dr. T. S. Bacon, . 


C : ctagious diseases. 


Jan. 


27, . 


Dr. H. E Emerson, 


Bacteria. 


Feb. 


6, . 


Dr. A. O. Morton, . 


The alimentary canal and some of 
its diseases. * 


Feb. 


16, • 


Dr. G. A Hoove, . 


The anatomy and physiology of 
the eye. 


Feb. 


1*, . 


Dr. L. C. Miller, . 


Diphtheria. 


March 


27, 


Dr. M. B. Hodskins, 


Disease? oi the kidneys. 


April 


~» 


Dr. G. A. Moore. . 


The anatomy and physiology of 
the eye. 


April 


7. . 


Dr. M. B. Hodskins, 


Tvph.id fever. 


April 


u, . 


Dr. T. S. Bacon. . 


Symptomatology of disease. 


April 


23, . 


Dr. R. A. Greene, . 


Air, respiration and ventilation. 


July 


10, . 


Dr. Everett Flood, 


Types of mental disease, with 
"stereopticon illustrations, and 
presentation of diplomas. 



20 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Gifts. 



NAME. 


Residence. 


Gift. 


Sunshine Society, . 


Palmer, 


Magazines and papers. 


Rev. W. H. Hart, . 


Palmer, 


Books, magazines and papers. 


Mr. C. E. Swett, . 


Boston, 


Loan of colored Japanese slides for stereopticon. 


Miss Louise Jelly, . 


Boston, 


Silk pieces. 


Miss Gussie Sentell, 


Tacoma, Wash., 


Decorations for Christmas tree. 


Mrs. Helen M. Whitman, 


Medford, . 


Needle-book, handkerchiefs and ribbons. 


Mrs. E. P. Wendemuth, . 


Dorchester, . 


Christmas cards, handkerchiefs and ribbons. 


Mrs A E Richardson 


W^est Roxbury, 


Christmas cards, handkerchiefs and neckties. 


Mrs. Regis J. Latinville, 


Westborough, . 


Christmas cards, handkerchiefs and ribbons. 


Miss Nellie J. Evans, • 


Easthampton, . 


Flannel and cotton cloth. 


A 01 g ri c ft n Baptist Mis- 
sionary Union. 


Boston, . . 


Loan of slides for stereopticon for lecture on 
"Indian Missions " 


Mr. Lyman Gage, . 


Monson, . 


Magazines and papers. 


A friend 


Palmer, 


Books. 


Miss Hattie Cushman, . 


Monson, . 


Books. 


Mrs. Willis A. Moore, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Chas. Brainerd, 


Palmer, 


Magazines and papers. 


M rs. Adelaide A. Calkins, 


opnngneia, 


Magazines. 


Miss Mason, 


Springfield, 


Silk pieces. 


Mrs. E. A.Ellis, . 


Boston, 


Magazines. 


Mr. Edwin P. Ball, . 


Palmer, 


Magazines. 


Central Massachusetts 
Electric Company. 


Palmer, 


Admission of patients to theatre at Forest Lake, 
on various occasions. 


Eastern Hampden Agri- 
cultural Society. 


Palmer, 


Admission of patients to fair. 



Table Showing Patients employed, and in ivhat Way. 





Males. 


Females. 




27 




Industrial building : — 






Chair seating, 


2 




Printing, 


2 




Tailoring, cutting, 


1 




Tailoring, sowing, 


1 




Cobbling, 


6 




Jobbing, . 


1 




Carving, 


1 




Hair picking, 


2 





1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 21 



Table showing Patients employed, and in what Way — Concluded. 





Miles. 




Industrial buildiug — Concluded. 






Shoe sewing", ......... 






Mat making, ......... 


3 




Administration building, ....... 


~ 




Employees" cottage, ........ 


3 


5 


x> ur?e? nome, ......... 




■ 
o 


dewing rooms, ......... 






Laboratory. ......... 




- 


Dining rooms, ......... 






Kitchens, .......... 


1 A 


IA 

4u 


Laundry, .......... 


in 


ou 


ol.tuic;, .......... 


•3 
O 




\N ard work, ......... 


*>A 


t>4 


1 eat-Qlug. .......... 




1 


Music practice for assemblies, ...... 




I 


\^ ith yard man, ........ 


6 




Stone, etc., ......... 


on 
ou 




Painting, .......... 


6 




On roads, .......... 


■ 

O 




Clerical, 





- 


Weaving, 


1 


1 


Mason, 


1 




Carpenter. .......... 


1 




Boiler house, 


4 




Farm : — 






Such work as apple picking, barn, vegetable garden. 


18 




clearing land, cutting brush, ditching, teaming. 






tending sheep, tending cows, milking" with gar- 






dener. 








211 


205 



Amusements. 

Dances. 47 : masquerade. 1 : readings and impersonations. 
9: illustrated lecture. " Japan," 1 ; illustrated lecture. "In- 
dian Missions." 1 : illustrated lecture. •• Ben Hur." 1 ; sessions 
of dancing school. 27 : entertainment, legerdemain. 1 : enter- 
tainment, local talent. 2 : stereopticon entertainment. 1 : mu- 
sicales. 6; phonograph concert. 1: excursions to Forest Lake, 
24 : excursions to fair, 4 : excursion to circus. 1 : excursion. 
May 30. 1903, to see parade. 1; sleigh rides. 2: carriage 
rides, 29 : car rides. 4. 



22 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Schools. 

Average number of persons attending school, males, 8 ; fe- 
males, 25 ; one patient, who is an experienced teacher, assists 
the instructors. Instruction is given in (1) the kindergarten ; 
(2) reading; (3) writing; (4) numbers; ( 5 ) geography ; (6) 
history; (7) nature study ; (8) calisthenics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



23 



AKTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
SEWING ROOM. 



Sheets made, 


264 


Strainers made, . 


10 


Pillow cases made, 


449 


Floor swabs made, 


144 


Bed ticks made, . 


74 


Coats made, .... 


2 


Mattress ticks made, . 


2 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


5 


Pillow ticks made, 


29 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


12 


Table cloths made, 


21 


Shirts made, .... 


217 


Napkins made, 


192 


Undershirts made, 


66 


Doilies made, 


87 


Nightshirts made, 


44 


Tray cloths made, 


10 


Underdrawers made, pairs, . 


65 


Curtains made, 


12 


Denim socks made, pairs, . 


8 


Sash curtains made, pairs, . 


23 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


76 


Bureau covers made, . 


47 


Neckties made, 


71 


Splashers made, . 


3 


Garters made, pairs, 


217 


Towels made, 


1,016 


Aprons made, 


113 


Clothes bags made, 


57 


Night dresses made, 


10 


Clothespin bag made, . 


1 


Bibs made, .... 


7 


Fish bag made, 


1 


Bathing caps made, 


17 


Sawdust bags made, 


6 


Eye shade made, . 


1 


Tea and coffee bags made, . 


6 


Screens covered, . 


2 


Rugs made, .... 


167 


Hats trimmed, 


16 


Sofa pillows made, 


5 


Quilts hemmed, . 


20 


Couch covers made, 


2 


Blankets hemmed, 


33 


Chair cover made, 


1 


Blankets bound, . 


2 


Portieres made, pair, . 


1 


Trousers shortened, pairs, . 


49 


Radiator covers made, . 


4 


Sleeves shortened, pairs, 


8 


Dusters made, 


17 


Sleeves lengthened, pairs, . 


3 


Oven cloths made, 


6 







24 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 

WARDS. 



Aprons made, 


182 


Clothes bags mended, . 


32 


Chemises made, . 


92 


Coats mended, 


193 


Corset covers made, 


36 


Coats relined, 


13 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


. t 88 


Chemises mended, 


111 


Dresses made, 


132 


Corset covers mended, . 


81 


Dress skirts made, 


2 


Drawers mended, pairs, 


128 


Night dresses made, . 


99 


Dresses mended, . 


498 


Petticoats made, . 


43 


Hoods mended, 


63 


Shirt waists made, 


12 


Mittens mended, pairs, 


14 


Masquerade suits made, 


42 


Night dresses mended, 


288 


Neckties made, 


39 


Nightshirts mended, . 


72 


Bandages made, . 


10 


Overalls mended, pairs, 


71 


Bibs made, . 


42 


Petticoats mended, 


329 


Clothes bags made, 


3 


Shirts mended, 


228 


Curtain made, 


1 


Shirt waists mended, . 


116 


Dusters made, 


148 


Stockings mended, pairs, 


3,260 


Dishcloths made, . 


111 


Trousers mended, pairs, 


216 


Floor swabs made, 


189 


Undershirts mended, . 


90 


Holders made, 


762 


Undervests mended, 


358 


Rug made, . 


1 


Underdrawers mended, pairs, 


379 


Restraints made, . 


7 


Vests mended, 


163 


Screens made, 


4 


Blankets mended, 


2 


Table covers made, 


6 


Counterpanes mended, 


4 


Towels made, 


. 1,009 


Pillow cases mended, . 


9 


Aprons mended, . 


263 


Sheets mended, 


12 


Bibs mended, 


2 


Towels mended, . 


31 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — 



No. 62. 



25 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOMS. 



Shop*; niflflp nair^ 


284 


Bandages made, . . • 


525 


Slippers made, pairs, 


81 


Holders made, 


12 


('loth ovpv^hop^ madp nii'is 


53 


Oven cloths made . 


20 


Brooms made, . . . 


218 


Pamphlets printed, 


1,530 


Rope rugs made, . 


42 


Weekly paper printed, copies, 


4,600 


Mattresses made, . . . 


12 


Blanks printed . . . 


59,280 


Pmt hnncrpvs madp 


170 


Shoes mended, pairs, . • 


846 


Paper tablets made, . . 


167 


Shoes marked, pairs, . . 


127 


Stools made, .... 


3 


Suspenders repaired, pairs, . 


11 


Cribbage board made, . 


1 


Umbrellas repaired, . . 


93 


Pill envelopes made, . . 


2,500 


Pillows renovated, . . 


461 


Screens made, 


3 


Blankets eyeletted, . . 


9 


Rug frame made, . 


1 


Harnesses repaired, 


55 


Blanket box made, 


1 


Horse blankets repaired, 


4 


Stand for fish tank made, 


1 


Curry-comb repaired, . 


1 


Clock frame carved. 


1 


Cawiacrp pnrtains vpnaived 


2 


Wooden doorplates carved, . 


Q 


Carriage mats repaired, 


3 


Single letters and numbers 




Buffalo robp vpnairpd 


1 


carved .... 


13 


T7ppr] haskpt vpnairpd 


1 


Windin cr ^tair naftpvn s madp 


2 


Coat hancrprs vpnaivpd 


5 


Tin name holders made, 


85 


Chairs repaired, . 


7 


Chair cushions made, . 


3 


Chairs reseated, 


14 


Bandage rollers made, . . 


2 


Baskets repaired, . . . 


54 


Swing chair made, 


1 


Step-ladders repaired, . 


7 


Hair picked, pounds, . 


100 


Screens repaired, . 


42 


Dresses made, 


203 


Stools repaired, . 


7 


Petticoats made, . 


109 


Hammer handles repaired, . 


10 


Aprons made, 


57 


Mats repaired, 


5 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


67 


Belts repaired, 


3 


Night dresses made, 


173 


Window shades repaired, 


3 


Chemises made, . . . 


49 


Rocking horse repaired, 


1 


Belts made, .... 


48 


Swing chairs repaired, 


5 


Coats made, .... 


388 


Base balls repaired, 


6 


Vests made, .... 


83 


Wash board repaired, . 


1 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


119 


Drawers for laboratory re- 




Overalls made, pairs, . 


80 


paired, .... 


2 


Mittens made, pairs, 


150 


Syringes repaired, 


6 


Bibs made, .... 


12 


Trusses repaired, . 


3 


Towels made, 


12 


Pieces mended, 


5,748 



26 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



FARM PEODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1902, to Oct. 1, 1903. 



Milk, 143,513 quarts, $7,175 65 

Eggs, 200f dozen, 50 18 

Hay, 235 tons, 4,230 00 

Meadow hay, 30 tons 300 00 

Rowen, 20 tons 240 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons, 900 00 

Green fodder, 117 tons 351 00 

Rhubarb, 2,318 pounds, 92 72 

Currants, 144 quarts, 14 40 

Lettuce, 2,070 heads, 41 40 

Green peas, 46 bushels, 57 50 

Radishes, 4 bushels, 8 00 

Cucumbers, 1,994, 89 88 

Cucumbers for pickles, 8 bushels, 12 00 

Sweet corn, 6,780 ears, 67 80 

Tomatoes, ripe, 46^ bushels, 46 50 

Tomatoes, green, 53 bushels, 26 50 

Pears, \ bushel, 1 00 

Apples, 202 barrels, 310 00 

Summer squash, 3,052 pounds 76 30 

Winter squash, 10 tons, 200 00 

Beans, 65 bushels, 86 00 

Pumpkins, 9 loads, 30 00 

Horseradish, 1 barrel, 2 00 

Potatoes, 1,268 bushels 794 20 

Cabbage, 9 tons, 180 00 

Turnips, 298 bushels, 119 20 

Beets, 564 bushels 338 40 

Beets, 168 bunches, 16 80 

Carrots, 623 bushels, 373 80 

Onions, 171 bushels, 171 00 

Field corn, 75 bushels, 75 00 

Broom corn, 10 00 

Blackberries, 40 quarts, . . 4 00 

Parsnips, 230 bushels, . • 172 50 

Grapes, 325 pounds, 6 50 



Amount carried forward, $16,620 23 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT 

Amount brought forward, . 

Greens, 28 bushels, 

Wool, 250 pounds, 

Pork, 4.375 pounds, 

Lard, 62 pounds, 

Beef, 584 pounds, 

Tallow, 25 pounds. 

Fowl, 14 pounds, 

Chicken, 95^ pounds, 

Duck. 9| pounds, 

Lamb, 1,204^ pounds, 

Veal, 312 pounds, 

Pigs sold, 33, 

Lamb sold, 1, 

Cow sold, 1, 

Calves sold, 14 

Sheep and lamb pelts sold, 29, . 

Vegetables from greenhouse : — 
Beans, 19.\ bushels, .' . 
Squashes, 190, . . . 

Lettuce, 838 heads 

Spinach, 9i bushels, 

Parsley, 3 bushels, 

Cucumbers, 468, 

Onions. 5 bushels, 

Beets, 8 bushels, 

Turnips, 1 bushel, 

Carrots, 8 bushels, 

Tomatoes, 20 bushels, .... 

Greens, 21^ bushels, 

Peas, 5£ bushels, 

Parsnips, 4 bushels, 

Cabbages 150, 

Celery, 585 heads, 

Tomato plants for farm, 750, 
Cabbage plants for farm, 250, . 
Pepper plants for farm, 1 box, . 
Celery plants for farm, 2 boxes, 
Leeks, 80 bunches, 

Total, 



Xo. G2. 27 

. |16,620 23 

12 60 
50 00 
387 54 

4 96 
40 88 

75 
1 96 

15 28 
1 56 

144 54 
37 44 
91 50 
6 00 
19 00 
81 50 

16 02 

19 50 

5 70 
29 03 

9 50 

3 00 
9 36 

5 00 

4 80 
40 

4 80 
15 00 
21 50 

6 88 
4 00 

7 50 

17 55 
15 00 

63 
50 
1 00 
4 00 



$17,716 41 



28 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, 




$2,500 00 


Assistant physicians (2), per year, . 




1,000 00 


Assistant physician, per year, .... 




500 00 


Treasurer, per year, 




300 00 


Clerk, per year, 




600 00 


Stenographer, per month, 




30 00 


Office assistant, per month, .... 




20 00 


Steward, per year, 




1,000 00 


Drug clerk, per month, 




23 00 


Supervisor (woman), per month, 




24 00 


Assistant supervisor (woman), per month, 




22 00 


Supervisor (man), per month, .... 




35 00 


Night nurses (women, 5), per month, 


$14 


00-18 00 


Nurses (women, 17), per month, 


. 14 


00-22 00 


Night nurses (men, 5), per month, . 


. 20 


00-25 00 


Nurses (men, 19), per month, .... 


. 20 


00-35 00 


Engineer, per year, 




950 00 


Assistant engineer, per month 




50 00 


Helper, per month, 




32 00 


Firemen (4), per month, 


. . $25 


00-28 00 


Baker, per month, 




46 00 


Kitchen man, per month, 




27 00 


Handy man, per month, 




34 00 


Cooks (4), per month, 


$22 


00-30 00 


Assistant cooks (5), per month, 


. 14 


00-20 00 


Table girls (4), per month, .... 




18 00 


Foreman industrial room, per month, 




45 00 


Seamstress, per month, 




30 00 


Assistant seamstresses (2), per month, 




18 00 


Laundress, per month, 




20 00 


Laundry man, per month, 




27 00 


Assistant laundresses (5), per month, 


$14 


00-18 00 


Farmer, per year, 




850 00 


Assistant farmers (9), per month, 


$20 


00-35 00 


Gardener, per month, 




25 00 


Assistant gardener, per month, .... 




23 00 


Driver, per month, 




35 00 


Head carpenter, per day, 




2 50 


Assistant carpenters (3), per day, 




2 25 


Painters (2), per day, 


. . . $ 


L 50-2 00 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



29 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent ; in this case the approval of a judge is 
required, in addition to the physician's certificate and the no- 
tification of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Every patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to 
bed early. These restrictions are not irksome when they are 
fully understood, and can be complied with easily. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London north- 
ern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in Palmer, 
the other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, 
and the railroad fare is $1.90. 



30 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



TKEASUKEK'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The report of the finances of this hospital for the year end- 
ing Sept. 30, 1903, is respectfully submitted herewith. 



Assets. 

Real estate : — 
Cultivated land, 113 acres, 
Woodland, 21 acres, .... 
Pasturage, 92 acres, .... 
Farm (under appropriation 1901), viz. 

Cultivated land, 40 acres, . 

Woodland, 50 acres, . 

Pasturage, 30 acres, . 
Farm (under appropriation 1903), viz. : — 

Cultivated land, 50 acres, . 

Woodland, 190 acres, 

Pasturage, 60 acres, . 
Water and sewerage systems, . 
Quarry, 



Buildings : — 

Original buildings, 

Buildings (under appropriation 1895), . 
Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . 
Nurses 1 home, . > 

Electrical building, \ C under appropriation 1902), 
Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), 
Laundry (under appropriation 1901), 

Greenhouse, 

Farm group (under appropriation 1903), viz. : — 
House, .... $4,000 00 

Barn, 1,500 00 

Repairs 1,729 45 

New buildings, ... 24 91 



f 17,311 00 
1,465 00 
4,237 00 

1,600 00 
1,100 00 

300 00 

750 00 
2,850 00 
900 00 
33,353 71 
450 00 



$37,770 00 
84,000 00 
85,000 00 

25,300 00 

4,600 00 
9,476 94 
1,100 00 



Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), 



7,254 36 
500 00 



$64,316 71 



255,001 30 



Amount carried forward, 



$319,318 01 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62, 



31 



Amount brought forward, 
Personal estate : — 



$319,318 01 



Live stock on the farm, 


$7,299 


00 


Produce of the farm on hand, .... 


9,351 


65 


Carriages and agricultural implements, . 


3,747 


85 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures. 


39,136 


33 


Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 


9,590 


94 


Other furniture in inmates* department, . 


16,643 


98 


Personal property of State in administration 






building, 


6,481 


21 


Personal property of State in employees' 






cottage, 


1,595 


60 


Personal property of State in nurses 1 home, . 


4,626 


53 


Personal property of State in farm group, 


119 


78 


Personal property of State in greenhouse, 


537 


06 


Ready-made clothing, ..... 


1,526 


37 


Dry goods, 


4,126 


74 


Provisions and groceries, 


1,336 


50 


Drugs and medicines, 


3,706 


50 




9,738 


50 


Library, 


650 


00 


Other supplies undistributed, .... 


4,441 


69 



124,656 23 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1902 

Received from State on special appropriations : — 

Laundry building and machinery, 1901, . $2,546 65 

Nurses' home, 1902, 18,740 61 

Electric building and machinery, 1902, . . 17,704 73 

Land and buildings, 1903, .... 10,000 Ofr 

Repairs and alterations old buildings, 1903, . 1,799 23 

Wood buildings and furnishings, 1903, . . 24 91 

Water, sewerage and outside lighting, 1903, . 140 71 

Total from appropriations, . . . 

Received from State for maintenance, . . S97,162 90 

Received from towns for support of patients, . 50,792 96 
Received from individuals for support of 

patients, 5,747 95 

Received from soldiers' relief for support of 

patients, 339 39 

Received from interest on bauk deposit, . . 285 69 

Received from farm and farm products, . . 294 48 

Received from store, 420 85 

Received from barrels, j ank and sundries, . 218 56 



$443,974 24 



11,064 89 



50,956 84 



155,262 78 



Total receipts, 



$217,284 51 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Expenditures. 



Salaries, wages and labor, 

Food : — 

Butter, $3,206 42 

Beans 164 34 

Bread and crackers, 202 04 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., 907 26 

Cheese, 59 39 

Eggs, 1.095 63 

Flour, ........ 1,515 70 

Fish, 632 98 

Fruit 723 68 

Meats, 4,107 66 

Milk 585 67 

Molasses, 195 04 

Sugar 1,149 20 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, .... 45£ 70 

Vegetables, 1,292 14 

Sundries, 687 14 



Clothing and clothing material : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, $165 09 

Clothing ,. 231 43 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, . . 1,788 87 

Furnishing goods, 33 00 

Hals and caps, 49 50 

Leather and shoe findings, .... 484 69 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc $740 31 

Brushes, brooms, etc., ..... 91 30 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 325 44 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . . . 352 74 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 294 71 

Kitchen furnishings, 263 65 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., ... 71 10 

Sundries, 44 93 



Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, $19,441 75 

Electricity, 234 55 

Gas 585 80 

Oil 131 29 

Sundries, ........ 105 00 



135,699 80 



16,976 99 



2,752 58 



2,184 18 



20,498 39 



Amount carried forward, 



$78,111 94 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



33 



Amount brought forward, $78,111 94 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Bricks, §48 00 

Cement, lime and plaster, .... 543 73 

Doors, sashes, etc., 125 76 

Electrical work and supplies, .... 245 06 

Hardware, 298 82 

Lumber, 1,348 82 

Machinery, etc., 99 78 

Paints, oils, glass, etc., 1,010 19 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, . . 1,458 25 

Roofing and materials, 80 12 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll), . 183 75 

Sundries, 122 15 

5,564 43 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Blacksmith and supplies, $ 231 13 

Carriages, wagons and repairs, . . . 395 95 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 439 34 

Hay, grain, etc., 1,710 99 

Harness and repairs, 88 16 

Cows, 187 00 

Rent, 95 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 220 69 

Sundries, 282 60 

3,650 86 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., §231 36 

Chapel services and entertainments, . . 837 84 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 1,564 13 

Funeral expenses, 50 00 

Hose, etc 10 20 

Labor (not on pay roll), 2,215 41 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 1,442 55 

Postage, 246 35 

Printing and printing supplies, ... 69 70 

Return of runaways, ...... 9 85 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 784 24 

Stationery and office supplies, .... 393 81 

School books and school supplies, ... 10 26 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 541 27 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 231 23 

Tobacco, 357 44 

Water, 649 46 

Sundries, 190 57 

9,835 67 



Total expenses for maintenance, §97,162 90 



Amount carried forward, §97,162 90 



34 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

Amount brought forward, ....... $97,162 90 

Other expenses on special appropriations, .... 50,956 84 

Paid State Treasurer 63,654 63 

Paid on account of patients, 49 87 

Total expenditures, $211,824 24 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1903, 5,460 27 



|217,284 51 

Resources 



Cash on hand, 


$5,460 27" 


Balance for maintenance with State Treasurer, 


19,065 72 


Bills receivable for board, .... 


15,749 36 


Other bills receivable 


153 -05 


Unexpended special appropriations. 


40,434 30 


Patients" funds on deposit, .... 


756 09 


Nurses 1 training school fund 


17 54 


Expenses account of patients, .... 


83 24 


Liabilities. 




Salaries unpaid, 


$3,218 07 


Miscellaneous bills unpaid, .... 


5,459 62 


Patients' 1 funds, 


756 09 


Nurses 1 traiuing school fund, * 


17 54 



9,451 32 



?72,268 25 

Dividing the total expenditures for maintenance ($97,162.90) 
by the average number of patients (409.53) shows an 
annual cost per patient of $237 25-f- 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of .... 4 55 



1903.] PFBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Statement of Appropriations. 



OBJECT. 


Amount. 


Expended 

nrpvi An a 1 v 


Expended 

t hi a Vpa r 


Balance 
A. Vciilflb 1 6 * 


Laundry buildiDg and machinery, 


$9,500 00 


$6,930 29 


$2,546 65 


$23 06 


Furnishing new buildings, .... 


20,000 00 


19,891 73 


- 


108 27 


Nurses' home, 


20,000 00 


7 13 


18,740 61 


1,252 26 


Electric building and machinery, 


19,000 00 


279 71 


17,704 73 


1,015 56 


Land, buildings and chattels, 


10,000 00 




10,000 00 




Repairs, alterations and furnishings, 


4,000 00 




1,799 23 


2,200 77 


Buildings and furnishing, .... 


30,000 00 




24 91 


29,975 09 


"Water, sewage and outside lighting, . 


6,000 00 




140 71 


5,859 29 




$118,500 00 


$27,108 86 


$50,956 84 


$40,434 30 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 

Oct. 30, 1903. 

I have compared the treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1903, with the books kept at the institution, and find them to agree. 
Receipts for board, care, etc.. to the amount of £63, 654. 63, have been turned in to the 
State Treasnrer, for which his vouchers are on file. The cash account is correctly cast, 
and shows a balance in the hands of the treasurer as follows : — 



September receipts for board, care, etc., S2.868 10 

Former receipts to be accounted for, 2,592 17 

Money belonging to patients, 756 09 

Nurses' training school fund, 17 54 

$6,233 90 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, 85,282 10 

Cash vouchers not entered, 932 25 

Cash in safe at hospital, 19 55 



86,233 90 



GEO. L. CLARK. 

Auditor o f Accounts. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



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HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 









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42 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



S. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 











Cases 


ADMITTED. 








vnunrp r\v ttt i? 
*n L j I 1 > x - 1 <■ Ur La. Ed 

ADMISSION. 


INSANE. 


sane. 


TOTALS. 


X 

9 

a 
2 


■ 

1 

& 


x" 

a 
o 
E- 


■ 

o 
a 

a 


X 

1 f 

fa E- 


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1 

i 


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10 


17 


- 27 j 


50 


34 84 


60 


51 


111 




2 




2 


8 


3 11 


10 


3 


13 










4 


1 | 5 


4 


1 


5 


Total of cases, .... 


12 


17 


29 


62 


38 100 


74 


55 


129 


Total of persons, 


12 


17 


29 


60 


37 • 97 


72 


54 


126 







4. — Relations to Hospitals of Cases admitted. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 






x" 


x" 




X 

- 






i 






X 

«J 
a 
~- 


1 
fa 


- 

1 


m 
- 

a 


£ 
- 
fa 


a 
o 
H 


m 

a 


= 

9 
fa 


X 

a 


Inmates of this hospital only 


4 


5 


9 


45 


34 


79 


49 


39 


68 


Former inmates of this hospital only, 


2 




2 


9 


4 


13 


11 


4 


15 


Former inmates of this and other hospitals, . 








3 




3 


3 




3 


Former inmates of other hospitals : — 






















- 


2 


2 










2 


2 


Hospital Cottages for Children, .... 


2 


4 


6 


2 




2 


4 


4 


8 


Hospital Cottages for Children and State Hospital, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Hospital Cottages for Children and Tauotoo Intane 
Hospital. 








1 




1 






1 


Northampton Insane Hospital, . . . 




2 


2 










2 


2 






1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Taunton Insane Hospital 


2 




2 








2 




2 


Westboroogh Insane Hospital, 




2 


2 










2 


2 










1 




1 


1 




1 


Worcester Insane Hospital 


1 


1 


2 








1 




2 


Total of cases, 


12 


17 


29 


62 


38 


100 




55 


129 


Total of persons, . 


12 


17 


29 


60 


37 


97 


:i 


54 


126 



f903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — N 



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1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



45 



6. — Residence of Persons admitted. 





Insane. 




Sane 




Totals. 


LOL > 1 Its. 




■ 






■ 






X 








m 








X 


■ 


- 
s 


m 




■ 


1 


- 


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• 


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a 




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H 


Barnstable, 


1 


- 


4 


1 


2 


3 


2 




4 


Berkshire, 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


3 


- 


3 


Bristol, .... 


- 


- 


- 


6 


2 


8 


6 


2 


8 


Essex, .... 




1 


1 


3 


4 


7 


3 


5 


8 


Franklin, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Hampden, 




1 


1 


7 


2 


9 


7 


3 


10 


Hampshire, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Middlesex, . 


2 


2 


4 


14 


9 


23 


16 


11 


27 


Norfolk, 




1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


2 


4 


6 


Plymouth, 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


4 


Suffolk, .... 


5 


7 


12 


18 


9 


27 


23 


16 


39 


Worcester, 


3 


4 


7 


4 


4 


8 


7 


8 


15 


Totals, . 


12 


17 


29 


60 


37 


97 


72 


54 


126 



46 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS, 



[Oct. 





sa 

©" 

S 




5 & 
*o o 



TJ - o O 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 47 

8, — Occupations of Persons admitted. 



MALES. 





tu 
* 


E 


i 




d 

! 


B 


3j 




B 


02 


— — 






■3S 

or; 


s 

r- 


Clerk 








Shipping clerk, 

Shoemakers, 

Silversmith, 




1 


1 


Dentist, 




j 


j 


- 


3 


3 


Errand boy, 










1 




Farmers, 


1 






Stonecutter, 


1 






Fireman, . 








Stone mason, . 




1 




Galvanizer, 








Students, . 




2 




Laborers, . 


1 


11 


12 


Tailor, 








Machinist, . 








Teamster, 




1 




Merchant, . 








Wood finisher, . 


i 






Operatives, 






3 


Unknown, 


7 


24 


31 


Painters, 
Sailor, 


1 




2 












1 


Totals, 


12 


60 


72 



FEMALES. 



Bookkeeper, 




1 


1 


Student, . 




1 


1 


Domestics, . 


6 


6 


12 


Teacher, 


1 




1 


Housewives, 


1 


5 




Waitress, . . 




1 


1 


Herb doctor, 

Nurse, 

Operatives, 




1 
1 

4 


? 

1 

4 


Unknown, 


9 


17 


26 




Totals, 


17 


37 


54 


DAUGHTER OR WIFE OF — 


Carpenters, 


1 


2 


3 


Operatives, 


1 


1 


2 


Carpet layer, 




1 


1 


Painters, . 


1 


1 


2 


Conductors, 


1 


1 


2 


Paper hanger, . 




1 


1 


Electrician, 




1 


1 


Peddlers, , 




2 


2 


Farmers, 


1 


2 


3 


Plumber, . 




1 


1 


Hostler, 




1 


1 


Shoemakers, , 




3 


3 


Inventor, . 




1 


1 


Teamster, 




1 


1 


Laborers, . 


1 


4 


•5 


Upholsterer, 




1 


1 


Lather, 


1 




1 


Whip manufacturer, 


1 




1 


Lighthouse keeper, . 


1 




1 


Wood dealer, . 




1 


1 


Masons, 
Musician, . 


1 
1 


1 


2 
1- 










Totals, 


11 


27 


38 


Night watchman, 




1 


1 











48 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



9. — Probable Causes of Disease in Persons admitted. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Alcoholism, 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


Q 

o 


Apoplexy, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Cniiuoii in, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


9 


UlsaipailOU, 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


o 


Exposure, . 


- 




- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Fright, 


- 


- 


- 


4 


3 


7 


7 


brier, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Indigestion, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Intestinal worms, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


La grippe, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Malaria, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Masturbation, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2" 


Measles, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Menopause, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Menstruation, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Nervousness, 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


2 


2 


Overeating, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


2 


Overstudy, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Overwork, . 


- 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


2 


Pertussis, 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


Prenatal accident, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Scarlatina, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


2 


OLUIIJclUIl UUUUlc, , 








1 




1 


1 


Sunstroke, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


t 


Teething, . 










1 


1 


1 


Trauma, 


1 




1 


6 


3 


9 


10 


Typhoid fever, . 








1 




1 


1 


Vaccination, 








1 




1 


1 


Worry, 










1 


1 


1 


Unknown, . 


9 


11 


20 


33 


19 


52 


72 


Totals, 


12 


17 


29 


60 


37 

1 


97 


126 



.903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 







C7> 






CM 










o 






CM 


CM 










OO 




t*. 


























H 




















03 












































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CM 


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gg 


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a 






















< 














































00 




00 






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oo 






















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CO 


o 


00 




rH 


CO 


1— ( 


o 




r>- 




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o 


CM 










CO 








o 














































00 


o 


1 


1 


1—1 


1 








to 


03 


CO 












CM 




CM 


< 


1 


































































cm 


OO 








l 


CO 




CO 






<o 












CO 




CO 




"5 














































cr> 






i—l 




1 


*o 




CO 




"3 


CM 












CM 




rH 




© 






















EH 




















a 
z 

«< 


ales. 


£ 


1—1 


1 


i-H 


1— I 


1 


1— 1 




oo 


9} 


S 




































































CM 


1 




1 


1 


1 










<p 


1— 1 












1—1 








"3 











































CO 

> 

p 

a 

CO 



T5 

CO 

> 

O 

u 



O .15 
S3 



CO 

6d0 



CO 

> 

o 

a, 

a 

o 
'co 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



a 

H 

3 

CO 

O 
to 
M 
H 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 


Totals. 


I l<Mr-l I H(N(NHH 1 rH 1 


rH Wt lO 

H rH 

1 


3 

a 

o 


| | T—t T— 1 1 H H I | |l-H| 


1 

00 

t~— (>• CM 

o 


s 

3 


I 1 rH 1 | 1 rH 1 r-1 T— ! | | | 


1 

^ ^ «5 
CO 


AT FIRST ATTACK. 


2 

o 
H 




CO 

rH »— 1 CO 
rH rH 

OO 


o> 

a 


rH (M 1 rH | 1— 1 T— 1 T— < | | | | | 


oo 

t>» t> t>" 

rH 

CM 


«3 


rH rH rH 1 r»* 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


CM 

— f "HH 7-4 

co 


Persons admitted. 


WHEN ADMITTED. 


"3 
o 

Eh 


1 CDCOINrH | WOCOH | | | 


7—4) 

OS OS xH}H 
CM CM 

OS 
CM 


to 
o> 
3 

a 

CD 
&H 


1 CO CO 1 I— < I rH CO CM rH | | | 


»o 

t>» l>» »o 

rH rH 

OS 
CM 


3 


1 rvi rvi 1 1 ■ ry*. < till 


CM CM CM 

os 

CM 


AT FIRST ATTACK. 


3 
o 
Eh 


COCMCNtNCNHHeOH | | | CM 


CO 

os os os 

CM CM 


■ 

a 

&H 


CM CO 1 HHH 1 NH | | I H 


t>» t"» OS 




HH^CNHH | HH | | | | rH 


»o 

CM CM OS 


AGES. 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, .... 
From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, . 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years, . 

70 to 80 years, 

80 to 90 years, . 
Unknown, ..... 

Total of cases, 

Total of persons, 

Mean ages, .... 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



51 



1 1 1 — <M 1 1 1 — CN 1 1 1 


— 

r: 


1 1 1 1 IN 1 1 1 1 *-f 1 1 1 


tr. 7Z -r 


ll li-ll'lli-ii-llll 


r: r: £ 


I QI | H | 1 I 1 ~H — i 1 | i—i 


_ 

— ."^ 


1 *-• 1 «H | 1 1 1—1 1 | | 


r: en 


1— lllllll— II — 


oq sa » 

i 


1 Xr--r:r^^~r:^r — — I 1 


o s s 




5 S 
g 


i c - c -r n c c r: - l I i 


-2 g °5 
S 


u~ ~ c r. c m " l — — l «0 


~ £ - 

— o 


H«iQ«eOHHH | | — | rt 


? £ ~ 


~ ^ ~ N " ?1 ~ ^ 1 ~~ 1 1 " r 






HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 





B 

(r> 


Totals. 


I | (N(N(NH(NCM(NCO t •• — I 1 




t> 
i— i 


42.32 




IME OF DE. 


Females. 


I | r-l ^ H rH (N 1 l— 1 |»— ' 1 


o 


o 


40.20 


8 DIKD. 


H 
< 


3 
1 


I 1 »-H tH | 1 H 1 (NN 1 1 I 




t>- 


45.35 


Person 


X 

V 


Totals. 


INlOHlNHHHHHH | | 








22.66 




FIRST ATTA 


Females. 


HCQ | (N 1 HHHH | | | | 


o 


O 


23.75 




•< 


Males. 


i-HCN^Ii-l | | | rH | | 








20.83 




d 

H 


Totals. 


1 O --i X (M ^ iO CUM H | | 
r-1 CO CM rl i-H t-( 


Oi 
CM 


to 

CM 


28.83 




KN ADMITT 


Females. 


T— 1 


iO 
«0 




29.44 


Pkrsons admitted. 


OM 


Males. 






CM 


28.38 


M 
o 


Totals. 


«D 1-1 1-H 




Cl 
CM 


co 

CM 


15.97 




first att; 


Females. 


CO 


<M 


iO 


«0 


16.18 




H 
< 


Males. 


lOi-iCOCC^CMCMCO 1 r-» | I 
CO i— i 






CM 


15.81 


AGES. 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, .... 
From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years, 

70 to 80 years, 

80 to 90 years, 
Unknown, 


Total of cases, 


Total of persons, 


Mean ages, .... 



1903.] 



PUBLIC* DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



53 



Totals. 


TOTALS. 


•8I8JOX 


to i ieo«owt-«Oi-H<»t~ oi«o 

l-H <N i-H 1 CM CM — 




I «s 

CO 1 1 i-H CM CM CO t~ -t< <D CM 1 O -P C7> 

cm io m 

Eh 


•89113 y$ 


co i ioicQ'<*o>03t-c4»nj'**eMt£ 

i-H i-H rl t- t~ 

o 


ALL OTHER 
AD- 
MISSIONS. 


•eimoj, 


CM 1 1 1 ll-HO>CJ.-Ht-CM|i-Ha0O5 
l-H 1 TP CO 




1 CO 

<M 1 1 1 1 |iOi-h<Di-Hi-H 5000J 

rt 1-1 O 




1 -* 

I i l I I i-H-*coio«Oi-i|^5cOurs 

CM CM 

CM 


FIRST 
ADMISSION 

TO ANY 
HOSPITAL. 


•sjbjoj. 


-# I leooioaot-Oi-HOcocoS 
i— i eo •— i ao ao 


•881T3tU3j[ 


i-H I li-HC*CMeO<CCCOrH|0501l~ 
i-H CO CO 

eo 




CO 1 1 CMC0C0O-HCM<0-* 0>0>a0 
rH - tP h, . 

1 e» 


Sane. 


00 

< 
H 
O 


•8JB10X 


1 1 CO O CO CM CM <0 l~ lO I O 1~ t- 
i-i CM CM i-H 1 O OS 




i-H 1 li-HeMCMU5CC>"*Wi-H]COt-.CO 
rH 1 CO CO • 

CO 




1 <o 

CO 1 1 CMCO-*t~<OCM~HTti|CMOt— 
l-H l-H CO <D 

© 


ALL OTHER 

AD- 
MISSIONS. 


•8TBJOJ, 


1 o 

1 1 1 1 1 H O Tf O II— ooco 

r " s 


•eajBcoa^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CM i— 1 1 i-H 1 j rt CO CO 

oi 


•89{ej5 


1 Oi 

1 1 1 1 1 i-H CM U3 »0 1 1 1- lO CI 

1 rH 2 


FIRST 
ADMISSION 

TO ANY 
HOSPITAL. 




1 CM 

1 |e0"0iO00c0eMi-HU3|0>a>e0 

l-H CM l-H I t- t- 


•ea|Braajj 


1 t- 

i-H 1 1 i— ICMCMCOO-*Oi-Ht--ti-1<cO 

| CO CO ^ 




co I icicoeoiOi-ico<»Hi<|iOirt-H 

rH 1 C4 

oi 


h 
< 

10 

Z 


33 
1-3 

-4 
H 
O 




1 t— 

CM 1 1 1 1 IU0HtOl-H(M|0305»0 
i-H 1 CM CN ^ 


•83^019^ 


CM 1 1 1 1 ICOiHO |!-H.t~t-U5 

1-1 CM 


•saiTjj^ 


1 1 1 1 1 ICMCOiOi— i-HICMIMCC 

i 1-1 2 


ALL OTHER 

AD- 
MISSIONS. 




1 "* 

CM 1 1 | 1 I i/5 CO t- i-H CM © © 

CM CM © 


•891B019J 


1 >o 

CM 1 1 1 1 1 CO 1 CO 1 H j M CM it 


•89|«pj 


1 1 1 1 1 ICNCOrHi-Hi-H COOOCO 


FIRST 
ADMISSION 

TO ANY 
HOSPITAL. 


•8IBJOJ, 


1 CO 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i-H 0C 1 1 Oi Oi lH 

H* 


•89IBOI9J 


1 o 

I 1 1 1 1 1 1 -H 1 I O«5- 

CO 


•891T?P5 


I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -f 1 1 j — f" -J. lO 


PREVIOUS 
DURATION. 


Congenital, . 

Under 1 month, . 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 

Over 20 years, . 

Unknown, . 

Total of cases, 

Total of persons, 

Average duration 
in years. 



54 



HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



v. 

| 
CJ 



CO 

r 

53 





'8IB10X 




00 


<N 1 




CO 1 


OS 
CO 


QO 
CO 


00 

J 
H 
g 









CM I 






o> 

CM 


OS 
<M 










1 1 


<N 


t> 1 


o 


OS 
CO 




•g[BJOX 






CM 1 


CP 


1 1 




r>. 


a 

M 

« 








CM 1 


CO 


1 1 


o 


o 












CO 






i> 


VKD. 














co 


CO 


OH.1HI 




CM 1 1 III 


CM 


CM 


Not 






CM 






1 1 


CO 


CO 


a 






CO 




OS 
CM 


QO 1 


0* 


03 
CO 


[PROVE 






(N 




~# 








a 










iO 


t> 1 


CO 
CM 


CM 

<N 


>VED. 


•8JKJOX 




CM 




CM 


1 1 






IHJKI ] 




III .III 


1 1 


P 
_ 


•89IBRI 








CM 


1 1 







1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15. — Causes of Death. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 






V 

"5 


so 




s 


ce 










00 

CD 
03 

s 


a 

ay 

h 


« 

O 
r- 


■A 

i 


i 

5 
fn 


o 
H 


2 
"3 
S 


i 


o 


Nervous system : — 




















Cervical myelitis, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Exhaustion from epilepsy, 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


Status epilepticus, . . 


I 


o 


Q 
o 


i 
i 




1 

J. 


o 

6 


9 




Genito-urinary system : — 




















Chronic diffuse nephritis, 


- 




- 


- 


1 


1 




1 


1 


Respiratory system : — 




















Broncho-pneumonia, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Pneumonia, 


- 




- 


l 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Pulmonary edema, . 


1 


- 


1 


l 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


General : — 




















Senile gangrene, 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Suffocation, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Typhoid fever, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Totals, 


4 


7 


11 


3 


3 


6 


7 


10 


17 



56 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



•8IBJOX 


1 1 1 1 CO 


1 ^ 


1 CO 


1 CO 




68.25 




1 1 1 1 CO 


1 CO 








US 


•S3IBK 


1 1 1 1 1 






1 CM 







•88IBH 



i | | I I I rHHtNCO I 



Illllllir-ICQI!«# 



•SIBJOX 



•89I«K 



I I I I I IrlHOOO I 



I I I I I I I I iH 93 I 















N 










OS 


O 


•81BJ0X 










X 

a 










CO 


a 










CO 


55 










o 


H 




1 1 inn 


1 CO 1 1 1 1 




iQ 


« 






















CM 


< 










CM 














s 


•S3IFK 


1 1 1 1 1 


l«H | | | 






<o 

c 










B 













I I I I I I HHINCO I 



I I I I I I I I 1-1 CO I T*< 



w w w 

• " "3 "5 "5 w w w w • 
C C C ^ ^ ^ 

<■") o n o3 03 s3 53 

-aca a;><3;><1,a, 

- § CS 



"rHHWOHNlOOO k 

.2 § ^ ^ co g 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



1 1 i 1 CM i-t CO 1 1 1 1 


cn 


1 1 1 1 1 rH CN 1 1 1 1 


CO -r 

CO 


1 1 1 1 <M 1 «-l 1 1 1 1 


CO o 

CN 


1 1 1 1 1 1 | (N CN <"H H 


6. 

175.40 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 HHH | 


3 

202.23 

1 


1 I I 1 1 1 1 HH | rH 


CO iO 

CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (NCNhh 


6 

175.40 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 HHH | 


3 

202.33 


1 1 1 1 1 I 1 rH rH | rH 


CO «o 
CO 


l 1 1 INHCQ | | | I 


CO i> 


1 1 1 1 I rH CN 1 1 1 1 


CO 


1 1 1 1 <M | r-l | | | | 


CO o 

- 


1 1 1 1 1 I rH CO I rH rH 


CO O 
CM 
rH 


1 1 1 1 1 I rH rH | rH | 


CO o 



I I I I I I I CM I 



5mm 

. J2 ~ - - - 

+J ^ ffl 05 (B id 

C c C % J- b 

O O C ^ " ^ ^ 

r a a a « ® » a> 



13 I 



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h^ 3 



rS O C g ► G 





CO 




- 




O 




a 




.s 




o 






DO 


era 


o 




H 


< 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1903. 





VVN l'BHIOD Of 


•«WOi 


1 1 1 1 "*HO I (N | M 




50.57 




■aapnna j 


1 1 1 IINr-O |H |H 


o 


CO 
CO 




C J 
z < 
M g 










CD 

M 

I 


ss - 

x 

o 2 
E 




i i i i cm | cm 1 1 \f* i cn 


- 


56.4 


A.LL At 


fe 

c 
a 
o 
5 




1 1 1 1 1 1 ^OTiCN<-i 




CO 
CO 

»o 

CN 




*" X 

z < 
Z Q 




1 1 1 1 1 1 »H CN CO ^ 1 


o 


CN 
CO 
CN 




WHOI,K K 


•8318K 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H««H 




288.83 



•8[FJOi 


1 1 1 1 1 1 H « iC - 


t>- CO 

CO 
iO 

CM 




1 1 1 1 1 1 *-* CN CO 1 


CN 

o oo 

i-H CM 


S3IBPC 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 HtNCOH 


CO 

CO 
CO 
CN 



8IBJOX 



1* 



•8[BJOX 



Ci ! I I I I— 



I I I HMHlQ | | | | | O 



I I I I CN I ~f *~> I | | I N 



I I I I I l cn -r co n h r- 



I I I I I I CN CN CM I I O 



| I I | I | I C4H0OH I> 



tc tn co • 

3 7) ~ 53 06 M a 

P p ~ b h h 
* - ~ ~ 'C 'C 'C 'S • ' 
— - P >. ~ 

- " « m n >o c i t* . 

q ii HON - 

IsiPOOCoOOoSL- J2 
5 5 § 2 



EC -£ 

£5 



© 
be 

o 

< 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



or THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAIEROAD STATION, PALMER), 



Year ending September 30, 1904. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1905. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



Xo. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS; 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 



Year ending September 30, 1904. 




fa BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1905. 



«*AN81 192] 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



342. "iro 
3 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers 5 

Trustees' Report, 7 

Report of Superintendent 13 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room, 27 

Articles made and repaired in the Wards 28 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Rooms, 29 

Farm Products, 30 

List of Persons regularly employed, 32 

General Information, 34 

Treasurer's Report, 35 

Statistical Tables 41 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM X. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, . . Boston. 

CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary, .... Grotox. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Brooklixe. 

HENRY P. JAQUES. MD., Lexox. 

WALTER W. SCOFIELD. M.D., .... D Alton. 

WINFORD N. CALDWELL, Springfield. 

MARY P. TOWNSLEY, ...... Springfield. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., Superintendent. 

ARTHUR O. MORTON, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

RANSOM A. GREENE, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

LILLIAN M. KINCAID, Clerk. 

MARY W. WENTWORTH, Stenographer. 

CHARLES F. SIMONDS . Steward and Storekeeper . 

GEORGE E. BATES, Engineer. 

J. W. WILLIAMS, Farmer. 



CHAS. B. FISKE 



TREASURER. 

Palmer. 

Office at the Hospital. 



Commontocaltb of lltassacbusetts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To Eis Excellency the Governor and Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics at 
Monson respectfully submit the following report : — 

The Governor of the Commonwealth has renominated the 
two trustees. Mrs. Stedman and Mr. Clough. whose terms had 
expired, and these nominations have been confirmed. Airs. 
Adelaide A. Calkins has. to our great regret, found it advis- 
able to resign from the Board, and Airs. Mary P. Townsley of 
Springtield has been appointed to fill the vacancy. Mrs. 
Calkins has been a trustee since the establishment of the insti- 
tution. She has been a witness and an active participant in its 
growth and prosperity, and the loss of her judgment and her 
interest in its affairs cannot be replaced. 

The trustees did not consider it necessary during the past 
year to ask for any large appropriation. On the contrary, the 
work in hand and for which the funds had been already provided 
was more than sufficient to fully employ the time and thought 
of the officers of the institution, when taken together with their 
routine duties and the necessary details which always arise. 
Moreover, it was the view of the Board that in every pro- 
gressive institution a certain period of comparative rest is 
required, in order to better organize and arrange the already 
existing plant, and to think out and formulate the best methods 
for future advance and extension. In this way the general plan 
and policy can best be carried out, with the least risk of taking 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



any steps which would need later to be retraced or modified. 
For these reasons, the only appropriation asked for was one of 
$10,000, for the purpose of doing certain extra work and com- 
pleting certain details, as follows : — 

1. For the construction of an ice house at the old reservoir, . . $1,100 



2. For the construction of a greenhouse, specially designed for 

vegetables (this included removing one of our present old 
buildings to the vicinity of the present greenhouse, putting 
in suitable foundations, repairing this and other buildings, 
and rearranging the heating apparatus), .... 1,300 

3. Removing two other old buildings to new sites and repairing 

them 500 

4. Tearing down several old buildings at the Northrop place and 

repairing the house there for use as an isolation house, . 700 

5. For the construction of certain new roads and additional grad- 

ing, 400 

6. For the purchase of the Northrop pasture, as per lease, . . 250 

7. Vegetable cellar, 1,000 

8. Painting assembly hall and making stage, .... 200 

9. Taxes, 110 

10. Pipe covering, 90 

11. Water-closet vents in administration building, .... 100 

12. Attic rooms in infirmary, 400 

13. Attic rooms in farm group, two buildings, .... 700 

14. A lumber dry room with steam coils and exhaust steam con- 

nection, 750 

15. Concreting the basements in five buildings, .... 1,000 

16. Building in a refrigerator and concreting the floor in adminis- 

tration kitchen, 300 

17. Renewing old floors in employees 1 cottage, .... 250 

18. New conduits and steam piping where the old is decayed, . 450 

19. Running exhaust steam to employees' cottage and Hyde cot- 

tage, 200 

20. Repairing all the food elevators, 200 



A portion of this work has already been completed, and the 
rest will be as soon as the general arrangements will allow. 

The two new buildings in the farm group, whose erection 
and furnishing was provided for by an appropriation in 1902, 
have been completed during the past year and furnished, and 
the patients are now being moved in. They are similar and 
not unattractive in appearance, situated on the slope of the hill 
which formerly formed part of the Plumley farm and faced the 
old farm dwelling. They are one story high above the base- 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



ment, not including the attics. The basements, which are made 
partly of stone, are used for the kitchens, dining rooms and 
other purposes. 

These buildings are planned to accommodate 60 male pa- 
tients, who can work on the farm or grounds, and who are 
fitted to live in open buildings. They, together with the brick 
house, which was purchased with the Plumley farm and its 
attendant buildings, form the farm group. During the past 
year this brick house has been fully put in order and fitted up 
for the farm employees. The barns attached to it are now in 
good repair and in full use. 

A large amount of work has been earned on this year on 
the farm, the grounds and the gardens, by groups of patients 
under the care of suitable attendants. Road making and grad- 
ing has occupied much time and attention, and the position 
of the new farm buildings on the hill slope has made a large 
amount of this necessary around them. We find that in most 
places nothing short of concrete walks will resist the force of 
the torrents of wa^er which sweep down the hillsides. TTe 
have, however, improved steadily on the former conditions, 
and by means of catch-basins have succeeded in controlling the 
floods to a considerable extent. This work must, however, be 
continued persistently. 

A large amount of outdoor work has also been done in turn- 
ing back or returning to its old channel a brook which had, 
previous to our occupation of the farm, broken a new passage 
for itself, and was overflowing and rendering useless some of 
our most fertile meadow land. 

The trustees cannot too strongly state their belief that suitable 
work and occupation is one of the most important requisites in 
the care and treatment of the conditions for which our inmates 
seek relief. For a large proportion of our male patients out- 
door laboring work in one form or another is the best that can 
be provided. The patients must be graded, and each placed 
where he can do what is best suited to his capacity. Some can 
work but a short time consecutively, and can do only the sim- 
plest kinds of work, such as stone breaking : others are capable 
of much more ; and some are at times at least actively intelli- 
gent. Constant and unremitting supervision and care must 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



always be exercised, and it is our aim that this should be done 
in the surest and safest but least conspicuous manner. 

So much depends on the character, skill and judgment of the 
attendants in such an institution as ours, that too much care 
cannot be taken in their selection. Xo questionable or doubt- 
ful actions can be permitted. We believe that those now em- 
ployed are satisfactory. It is one of the most responsible, 
difficult and delicate duties of the superintendent to accomplish 
this. 

A full list in detail of the manifold kinds of work carried out, 
undertaken and completed during the year will be given in the 
superintendent's report. It is hardly necessary for us to re- 
peat that this year has purposely been devoted largely, in ad- 
dition to the building, furnishing and repairing of the new farm 
buildings and the land around them, to the arranging, improv- 
ing, repairing, strengthening and rendering more valuable the 
property under our charge. 

Certain of the old sheds which were so unsightly in front of 
the administration building have been removed, one torn down 
and its sound lumber utilized, one carried where it can be use- 
fully employed elsewhere. Two barns on the Xorthrop farm 
were removed from their rotten foundations, properly repaired, 
and are now stored with hay. 

Two thousand trees have been set out on the grounds. 

All the property not already surve} T ed has been carefully 
gone over, and bounds set. Two of the patients have been 
agreeably employed in this work. 

The trustees have sometimes been asked why they have not 
made more discoveries in relation to the causation, the treat- 
ment and the cure of epilepsy. The answer to this is evident to 
those who have studied the problem. It is two-fold. Firstly, 
a good deal of work has been done in this direction, in spite 
of the fact that the necessary routine and other duties of the 
officers must often leave them but little spare time. Secondly, 
— and this is a point not always thoroughly appreciated, — 
both time and money a^-e required to follow out the most prom- 
ising paths of investigation ; and, even were these unlimited, 
it is still important to have a specially skilled expert for much 
of the work of this character. One of the great drawbacks to 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



11 



the undertaking of special scientific investigation, aside from 
its cost, is the fact, which must be plainly recognized in the 
beginning, that it is almost the only form of valuable and 
important work from which no given results can be predicted 
in any special case. After the expense of time, labor and 
money, the result may be magnificent or it may be insignifi- 
cant. The more able and the more learned the expert inves- 
tigator, the more probable it is that the results of his work 
will be valuable, but in no case is it certain. Considering our 
resources and opportunities, much good research work has 
been performed this year. Extended observations on blood 
pressure have been made, and a form and method of adminis- 
tration of certain remedies has been determined. 

Every institution that does not progress falls behind its duties 
to the public and its privileges. Every active institution of 
the size and character of this one has many needs, some more 
or less absolute, some less pressing, and it is the duty of the 
governing board to set these forth plainly. The trustees have 
no desire to ask for anything which is not, in their opinion, 
required for the maintenance, advance and progress of the 
hospital, and for its best present and future welfare. 

We have, after mature deliberation, determined that our 
most important duty now is to provide better facilities for the 
care of our more actively afflicted men. While we are not 
required by the law to care for the violent, we necessarily have 
some patients who at times may create disturbances and be 
harmful to themselves and obnoxious to others. It is there- 
fore imperative that suitable rooms for such persons should be 
provided, and we ask for a building to accommodate 100 men, 
in which a sufficient number of these rooms shall be placed. 
The numbers of epileptics waiting in other institutions to be 
transferred here would more than fill such a building at once. 
It is evident that by such transference space will be left for an 
equal number of other patients in the institutions from which 
they are taken. 

In addition to this important matter, we need comparatively 
small sums for completing our former work, for repairs and 
minor details. It is desirable for us to move the old cow barn 
and the hay barn, together with the other old buildings, from 



12 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



their present position opposite and in front of the administra- 
tion building to a more suitable place. For this purpose we 
ask for $8,300; for the expense of the moving, $3,300, and 
S3, 000 for the new foundations required ; for concrete floors 
and fire-proof walls and floors, $2,000 are required. 

Very respectfully, 



W. N. BULLARD, 

For the Trustees. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 13 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics 
The following report is respectfully submitted 

Number of patients Sept. 30, 1903, .... 
Since admitted : — 

Sane (3 from visit, 1 from escape), 
Insane (2 from visit), .... 
Discharged and on visit : — 
Sane. — Much improved, 

Improved, 22 

Not improved, 14 

Died, 12 

Transferred, 2 

On visit, 8 

Escaped, 3 

Insane. — Much improved, 3 

Improved, 5 

Died, 13 

Transferred, .... 

On visit, 5 

Escaped, 2 

Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1904, 
Daily average of patients, .... 
Per capita cost (per week), .... 

I am glad to record the outlines of some of our work, and to 
announce a year of unbroken prosperity, to note the general 
contentment of our patients and to testify to the exceptional 
faithfulness of employees. The multitude of details to which 
you have patiently attended during the year would be too 
lengthy to rehearse. 

Your medical staff is fully alive to the opportunities and re- 
sponsibilities here. While we feel the need of more expert 



14 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



guidance, and hope for this to come in time, we are constantly 
alert for methods by which we can improve the condition of the 
patient. 

The tendency of patients to go home if they remain free 
from attacks a few months, calling themselves cured, is great, 
and the relapses which follow are discouraging. Going home 
on a visit is nearly always harmful, and hence we always advise 
to the contrary. 

So far the large number of improved cases furnishes our 
main encouragement. Nearly all gain here, and some remain 
free from attacks so long as they continue the routine life and 
are obedient to our slight restrictions. 

AW' deal in a degree with feeble-minded and insane, and yet 
even with them, improvement that might be classed as recovery 
from the epileptic seizures occurs ; with the balance, form- 
ing the more hopeful portion, much better results as to perma- 
nent recovery and a restoration to a self-supporting basis ought 
to be possible. 

The treatment carried on now and the research work under 
way are fully discussed in separate publications. We hope to 
improve upon these methods during the coming year. 

The advantages of a treatment room are great. We plan ex- 
tending its usefulness in several directions, by the addition of 
another electric light cabinet for the patient to be wheeled into 
in a recumbent position, for some further apparatus for me- 
chanical massage, and for an enlarged static machine. 

In the hospitals of Massachusetts there are 149 epileptic 
cases that are practically of the same grade as our present 
ward patients, and should be cared for here. This also agrees 
with the plans which the State Board of Insanity has outlined. 

The asylum cases, numbering 175, the State Board do not 
plan to transfer to us, and hence we need not try to provide 
accommodations for them. 

The other epileptics in institutions are as follows : — 



Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, 
Hospital Cottages for Children, . 

Almshouses, 

Private institutions, .... 



109 
99 

100 
12 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 15 



The main portion of epileptic persons in Massachusetts still 
reside in their own homes. The entire number in the State 
cannot be estimated at less than 10,000. At least 10 per 
cent, of them desire treatment away from home, as is evi- 
denced by applicants here, and an experience of some years 
with the friends of these persons. For this class, home- 
like cottages having small numbers in each are manifestly 
best. Twelve thousand dollars, for each such cottage, to care 
for a family of 25, would be about right. There should be 
many single rooms and cheerful exteriors, with gardens, 
hedges, etc. 

A small sum can be paid for treatment, so that this large 
number of persons need not be of much expense to the State 
beyond the cost of suitable residences. 

Many weak persons outside of hospital care are upheld and 
sustained morally and mentally by considerate friends, and 
this is, of course, the ideal mode of life for them ; but when 
these friends no longer help, the institution comes- in as a sub- 
stitute to protect the patient himself and the public as far as 
possible. 

The plan for future growth is essentially the same that has 
been advocated so many times already in these reports. 

A little more definite recommendation can be made than ever 
before, as our needs become more clear ly outlined. 

The wise provisions of the past have supplied many of the 
needs originally felt, and for those remaining new conditions 
require only slight modifications. I therefore recommend to 
your Board that efforts be made to secure this year suitable 
provisions for men who need single rooms, as a means of caring 
for those who are at times disturbed, and to give separate 
accommodations to the better and more appreciative men, who 
need a little moral restraint and who are not happy under the 
cottage system. Such a building should give us four distinct 
groups, and very much aid in classification. 

The list proposed will then stand as before : a general em- 
ployees' dining room ; a single-room building for each sex ; 
a cold-storage plant ; a laboratory. 

To this I wish to add for your consideration needs which 
appear to me to be following closely : a general assembly room ; 
a stable ; a cow barn . 



16 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



One large building to use with our present plant for men, 
and in time a similar one for women, and the small cottages 
each under an independent house father and mother will fur- 
nish the desired units. Several institutions for the epileptic 
have already signified their plan to work in this line after the 
example of the Bethel Colony. 1 believe this to be in the 
main the right course. 

Incidental to our progress has appeared much sooner than I 
expected the urgent call for the removal of all our farm build- 
ings to the new farm centre on the Plumley farm. This will 
improve the appearance of our main front, and will commend 
itself to every one familiar with the situation as necessary for 
the economical management of the farming operations. 

The amusements and entertainments provided for the patients 
have consisted as formerly of dances one evening and one after- 
noon each week, one evening each week with a hired enter- 
tainer, outdoor games and picnics. 

The dancing school which we hold each Saturday afternoon 
is much appreciated, and is a wholesome and helpful adjunct to 
our work. I cannot conceive of there being any harmful influ- 
ences from this or from the weekly evening dances. 

The Sunday services, the Saturday mass and the Sunday- 
school are valued aids. The receptivity of religious ideas is 
noticeable. We plan to keep this wholesome and normal, and 
not to introduce any sentimental excess. The demand among 
these patients for religious things is especially attended to at 
the Bethel Colony ; to a much less extent here ; but even 
there the methods are always commendable, and the patient 
helped and encouraged, taught self-restraint and charity, and 
the whole work sweetened to a remarkable degree. 

While our schools do as efficient work as can be expected, 
the value of manual training, to such patients as we have, is 
very evident, and can never be equalled by mere book culture. 
To the most of them our efforts come too late in life to yield 
full results. A few have been intelligently trained at home ; 
but nearly all are badly managed, dosed with harmful medicine, 
and are the victims of misdirected though affectionate advice 
from unskilled friends and from mercenary dispensers of dearly 
bought drugs and deceitful literature. I am sure there is a 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



great field of usefulness for general instruction as well as for 
the special manual training department of our school, which 
you have already authorized me to develop. 

We still keep up the extra meals served to the feeble patients 
in the morning and afternoon intervals between meals, and in 
many instances at bed time or in the night. A faithful, inter- 
ested nurse can dispense a large amount of food, generally 
bread and butter, egg-nog, oatmeal gruel or plain milk, and 
do the greatest possible service. 

The value of regular work to our patients is constantly meet- 
ing with proof. In many cases the short hours of service re- 
quired are cheerfully given ; but with some, whose minds are 
defective, and who look upon this as a place only for rest, 
amusement and abundant food, much difficulty is experienced. 
We persist patiently in trying to teach the lesson of industry, 
and the results are good. In some instances it is found unwise 
to urge the patient too much, for the reason that exertion of 
any kind is positively harmful, and after many careful tests we 
have to allow those cases to sink into inevitable dementia. 

I consider that the work in the various departments has been 
carried on admirably. The heads of departments especially 
deserve commendation. If we can in some way provide so 
that our ward service will be more permanent, I shall feel 
well satisfied. 

The pay of nurses is a subject for much consideration. We 
need high-minded persons, who are laboring for something 
more than a monthly stipend. 

Our teaching tends to inculcate the right ideas and to protect 
as much as possible our difficult class of patients from ordinary 
misuse. An effort is made not only to free our service from 
actual abuse, but to avoid uncharitable acts, and to introduce 
a spirit of friendliness and forbearance among all who deal with 
these afflicted persons. We are often encouraged b} r apprecia- 
tion, but, as a rule, have to persist in these efforts in the face 
of misunderstanding. 

On any but the German basis of unpaid service, we cannot 
hope to reach the ideal without paying much better wages than 
conditions now allow.- I cannot recommend the method to fol- 
low, but I know a pressing need exists in all our institutions. 



18 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. . [Oct. 



On account of the lengthening of the course for the nurses 
to three years, no class graduated last year, but the annual 
nurses' night was held. The demonstration was a prominent 
part of the enjoyable evening. The programme is exhibited 
below : — 

Several violin and piano selections. 
Demonstration by the nurses : — 

Preparation of special diet. 

Administration of hypodermics. 

Preparation of nurses for surgical operation. 

Bed making (competitive) . 

Artificial respiration. 

Gastric lavage. 

Spica bandage to shoulder. 

Sling to arm. 

Provisional dressing to fractured leg. 

Velpeau's bandage. 

Bandage making. 
Two addresses. 
Refreshments. 

The training school work for both men and women will be 
continued as formerly. On account of the short stay here of 
most men, we have to modify the teaching to meet the con- 
ditions ; but yet we believe in the usefulness of this training 
work for our men. 

The work on the special appropriation of last year has been 
carried along as rapidly as possible. Each of the twenty items 
has had its appropriate share of attention, and shows satis- 
factory progress. I consider the new plan for the vegetable 
gardens and the hen house associated with the plant a most 
promising arrangement. 

We can now occupy pleasantly at least 12 more men and 
boys in all weather, and they enjoy the situation, and are 
willing to be regular in their attendance upon this work. 
Very few of our patients have been trained manually, so that 
any special provision which enables us to give acceptable 
work has double advantages. I shall grasp every opening we 
have for such groups of workers, and constantly seek others. 

It would be interesting to enumerate all the work done in 
each department, but this would take too much space, and I 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



lit 



therefore name only the main portions of special work, making 
no mention of the bulk of the routine work, which has of 
course occupied the most of the time of the several depart- 
ments, with the purpose merely of making a written record for 
future reference. 

Our buildings have been kept in excellent repair. The 
additions have been well adapted to our needs. The south 
reservoir has had some attention to keep up connection with 
the fountains. The large west reservoir has been thoroughly 
cleaned and the dam repaired . The ice pond dam has required 
much attention, but now is in permanent order. 

The largest portion of such work, that represented by the 
additions to the greenhouse, moving buildings, repairing the 
barns, construction of storage cellar, etc., is not enlarged upon, 
as these have been enumerated under their appropriations. 

Farmer's Department. — Getting out lumber to repair farm 
group barns. Cutting and delivering telephone and electric 
light poles. Moving slaughter house. Repairing highways 
near hospital grounds. Moving and repairing barns at farm 
cottage. Tearing down old stable and sheds at farm cottage. 
Tearing down swill house, shed, and tool house. Filling and 
grading old building sites. Setting two thousand trees. Re- 
moving wall around farm barns, and replacing same with a 
good, substantial board fence. Filling and grading around 
farm group Xo. 3. Putting in culvert catch-basins and drain- 
pipe. Building roads to farm groups Nos. 1 and 2, and to 
farm group Xo. 3 barns. Hauling gravel for roads and walks. 
Hauling stone for foundation at greenhouse and new store- 
house. Hauling cement, sand and gravel for same. Hauling 
stone for walls at farm group. Finished clearing ice pond. 
Clearing reservoir. Hauling boundary stones around farm and 
setting same. Moving building at farm group Xo. 3. Finish- 
ing putting in sewer at farm group Xo. 3. Cutting and hauling 
posts for ladder shed. Moving boiler and furniture to farm 
group. Hauling Akron pipe and brick to farm group and 
greenhouse. 

Steward's Department. — Double doors in men's and women's 
hospital kitchens. New elevators put in two buildings. New 
food cart. Kettles in kitchen building and women's hospital 
covered. 



20 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Supervisor of Nurses (Women), — Nurses' time changed; 
now have two afternoons off duty each week. Each new 
patient is vaccinated when admitted. Blood pressure taken 
by nurses on wards. Preliminary course continued. Teeth 
cleaned. Special treatment for 10 patients, consisting of elec- 
tric and shower baths, gastric lavage, massage and special diet. 
New caps for nurses. Operating room fitted up with new table, 
instruments and stretcher. New receiving room for cleaning 
patients and disinfecting their clothing in basement of women's 
hospital. Nurses' room on Ward B used for patients. 

Marking Room. — Fitting up treatment room. Fitting and 
moving into new storeroom. Fitting up dentist's room. Fit- 
ting up two receiving rooms. Fitting up farm group buildings. 

Supervisor of Nurses {Men). — Electric cabinet bath at 
women's infirmary. Teeth cleaned and filled. Grading at 
farm group, G. cottage, nurses' home, M. cottage, men's in- 
firmary cottage, women's infirmary, women's hospital, men's 
hospital. Catch-basins. Ditches dug. Lajdng pipe. Walks 
and roads made and repaired. 

Carpenter's Department. — Fifty picture frames. Instru- 
ment case. Six report cabinets. Wagon body for farm. 
Wash trays for laundry. Clothes boxes for laundry. Sorting 
boards for laundry. Two soap tanks for laundry. Eighteen 
towel racks, farm group. Four sleds. Six hose houses. Five 
book cases. Food cart and shed. Refrigerator, administration 
building. Book case, administration building. Music rack. 
Window seat, nurses' home. Cabinet for clock, nurses' home. 
Forty-eight shoe boxes, Ward C. Fumigation rooms, Wards 
A and I. Stand and trellis, Ward A. Door in Ward A. Door 
in women's kitchen. Door in men's kitchen. Work at farm 
group No. 3. Work in new buildings, farm groups Nos. 2 
and 3. Screens, nurses' home. 

Engineer's Department. — Removed gas generator to new 
location, and changed pipe on same. Piped laboratory for gas, 
fitting same for three Bunsen burners. Wiring for electric 
lamps, farm group No. 2. Running telephone to farm group 
No. 1, and installing telephone. Telephone conduit from 
men's hospital to administration building. New stove pipe on 
chimney at office in horse barn. Telephone in greenhouse, 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



21 



wires and telephone. Water motor at dispensary in operating 
room. Bath tub in receiving ward, men's hospital. Bath tub 
in receiving ward, women's hospital. Gauge board in power 
house, containing two steam gauges, one recording gauge, two 
water gauges and one back-pressure gauge. Erecting Harris- 
burg standard engine. Changing over seven hydrants on water 
system. Rewiring cow barn with armored conduit for electric 
light. Connecting stone trough at farm group Xo. 3 with 
water from main service. Electric lights, farm groups Nos. 1 
and 3. Adding one new meter to meter battery, and putting 
in new inlets and outlets to meter chamber. Xew hydrant at 
greenhouse. Wiring power house for incandescent lamps. 
Piping toilet room and bathroom, hot and cold water in power 
house, and heating coils also in power house. Telephones and 
lines from receiving ward, men's hospital to nurse's room, Ward 
1. Removed old piping that connected dynamo engine and 
old slow-speed engine ; also changed over reducing pressure 
valve and by-pass on administration building circuit. Pipe 
rail around engine and generator. Twelve guard railings for 
lawns. Painting pipes and wall in power house. Wire grating 
for office in power house. Steam heating coil around laundry. 
Connecting manode with steam and return. Wiring polisher 
in laundiy. 

Stenographer. — Completion of extension of letter tile. 
Proofreading of reprint of all medical lectures written by the 
hospital staff. 

Gardener's Department. — Moving the furnace. Setting out 
strawberry plants. Pulling beans. Digging ditches. Dig- 
ging cellar for new greenhouse. Digging cellar for boiler 
room. Building hen house. Putting in catch-basin. Setting 
out trees at hospital. Mowing lawns. Setting out bulbs at 
hospital. 

Painter's Department. — Greenhouse. Finishing new cases 
in dispensary. Men's building inside. Women's building in- 
side. Bakery inside. Men's and women's kitchen inside. 
Finished painting first coat, women's infirmary, men's infirm- 
ary, men's infirmary cottage, M. cottage. Assembly hall. 
Kitchen building dining-room. New hen house. Adminis- 
tration building porch and cornice. About one hundred new 



22 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



screens and doors. Porches, women's infirmary, men's infirm- 
ary, men's infirmary cottage, G. cottage. Carpenter's shop 
outside. Outside piggery. Fire escape, nurses' home. Farm 
group No. 3, house all through inside, cornice, and new porch 
outside. Primed horse barn outside and front of cow barn. 
Painting new room, farm group No. '2. 

Articles written. 

1. Six lectures (titles elsewhere). 

2. Heart Lesions. 

3. Report of the Treatment of Ten Cases of Epilepsy. 

4. Report on the Hypochlorization Method of Treatment of 
Epilepsy. 

5. Reflexes in Epilepsy. 

6. Treatment of Status Epilepticus. 

7. Myoclonus Epilepsy. 

8. Lumbar Puncture in the Treatment of Status Epilepticus. 

9. Report of Cases of Exhaustion Paralysis. 

10. Chart for the Examination of Stomach Contents. 

11. Chart for the Examination of Urine. 

12. Lantern Slides, illustrating Fourteen Cases, from Infancy to 
Present Time. 

13. Records of 1,200 Observations on Blood Pressure. 

14. Record of Percentage of Cases caused by Head Injury. 

15. Record of All Inmates as to Dressing, Feeding, Washing, 
Spasticity, Weakness of Limbs, Inco-ordination, etc. 

16. Record of Age at which Attacks began in 900 Cases. 

Autopsies and Findings. 

Case No. 41. — Male. Autopsy Jan. 11, 1904. Dura mater ad- 
herent and thickened over vertex and at base ; pia moderately con- 
gested and somewhat thickened ; small amount of serum in pia ; heart 
much dilated ; mitral valves thickened and edges curled ; old adhe- 
sions over lower part of both lungs. 

Case No. 825. — Male. Autopsy Jan. 26, 1904. Dura rough, 
thickened, and adherent over frontal region ; pia moderately con- 
gested, thick; lungs edema and emphysematous patches; scar in 
left apex ; heart organized clot in aorta and pulmonary artery ; heart 
dilated ; numerous calcareous plates and atheromatous patches in the 
aorta. 

Case No. 474. —Male. Autopsy May 18, 1904. Dura mater 
adherent in the vicinity of the base ; patches of atheroma in the 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



23 



arteries at the base of the brain ; great extravasation of blood on the 
posterior inferior surface of the cerebellum ; large hemorrhage in the 
centre of the cerebellum, and all the ventricles contained clots of 
blood ; left pleural cavity entirely obliterated by adhesion. 

Case No. 563. — Female. Autopsy May 6, 1904. Edema of brain ; 
cystic tumor of left frontal lobe. 

Case No. 823. — Female. Autopsy Nov. 19, 1903. Adherent 
dura; edema of arachnoid and pia ; sclerosis of the circle of Willis. 

Case No. 443. — Female. Autopsy July 21, 1904. No pathological 
changes found. 

Case No. 699. — Female. Autopsy May 2, 1904. Adherent dura ; 
tubercular left lung ; sclerosis of coronary arteries. 

Pathological Material collected. 

Brain, cystic tumor, left frontal lobe. 
Cord, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 
Four brains. 
Heart. 

Brain, cerebellar hemorrhage. 

Cord, sclerosis. 

Kidneys, fatty. 

Heart, acute dilatation. 

Arteries, atheroma and calcareous plates. 

One fibro-cystic tumor. 

One purulent appendix. 

Operations. 

Amputation of three fingers ; results good. 

Two circumcisions ; results good. 

Perineorrhaphy ; results fair. 

Perineorrhaphy ; results good. 

Two appendectomies ; results good. 

Removal of ovarian fibro-cystic tumor ; results good. 

Two double ovariectomies ; results good. 

Eight lumbar punctures ; results varied. 

A very large number of minor dressings. 



Clergymen who have held Services here. 



Rev. Charles Olmstead. 
Rev. N. M. Pratt. 
Rev. Willis A. Moore. 
Rev. Fr. Carey. 
Rev. Dr. J. S. Lemon. 



Rev. M. Oakman Patton. 
Rev. C. N. Williams. 
Rev. Frederick F. Johnson. 
Bishop Vinton. 



24 HOSPITAL FOK EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Medical Lectures. 



DATE. 


Name. 


Subject. 


1904. 

Jan. 16, . 


Dr. A. C. Getchell, 


Treatment of tuberculosis. 

• 


Jan. 23, . 


Dr. A. 0. Morton, . 


The heart. 


Jan. 30, . 


Dr. M B. Hodskins, 


The kidneys. 


Feb. 6, . 


Dr. R. A. Greene, . 


The stomach. 


Feb. 12, . 


Dr. T. S. Bacon, . 


Eruptive fevers. 


Feb. 16, . 


Dr. J. X. Fairing, . 


Theory of wounds, modes of heal- 
ing and complications. 


Feb. 26, . 


Dr. A. 0. Morton, . 


Bronchitis. 


March 3, . 


Dr. L. C. Miller, . 


Modified milk. 


March 12, . 


Dr. R. A. Greene, . 


Appendicitis, nephrolithiasis and 
cholelithiasis. 


March 19, . 


Dr. M. B. Hodskins, 


Bacteria. 


March 26, . 


Dr. S. 0. Miller, . 


Fractures. 


March 31, . 


Dr. S. B. Keith, . 


Teeth. 


April 9, . 


Dr. J. P. Schneider, 


Typhoid fever. 


April 12, . 


Dr. T. S. Bacon, . 


Surgical nursing. 


April 25, . 


Dr. G. A. Moore, . 


Colds. 


May 10, . 


Dr. Herbert C. Emerson, 


Bacteriology. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



25 



Gifts. 



NAME. 


Residexce. 


Gift. 


Eastern Hampden Agricultural Society, • 


p 1 

r& mer, . 


A Hmiaainn c\ f natT^ni a ir\ fn\r 


Alios laena Li. xioidiook, .... 


r aimer, . . 
Monson, . . 
Brooklyn, N.Y., 


Books and magazines. 




Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. Harriet E. Bradley 


Books and papers. 


Mrs. A. E. Richardson, .... 


West Roxbury, 


Neckties. 




Monson, . 


Dental services. 


Dr. Silas B. Keitb 


Palmer, 


Dental services. 




Palmer, 


Catechisms. 




Springfield, 


Services. 


Mrs. Mabel W. Stedman, .... 


Brookline, 


Worsted. 




Stafford, Conn., 


Photograph. 


Dwinell- Wright Co 


Palmer, 


Magazines. 


Boston, 


Magazines. 


Central Massachusetts Electric Com- 








Palmer, 


Admission of patients to theatre 




at Forest Lake, on various oc- 
casions. 




Boston, 


Cash, $4, spectacles. 



Table showing Patients employed, and in what Way. 




Females. 



Industrial building, . 
Administration building, 
Employees 1 cottage, 
Nurses' home, 
Sewing rooms, 
Laboratory, 
Dining rooms, 
Kitchens, . 
Laundry, . 
Stable, 
Ward work, 
Grading, . 
Teaching, . 

Music practice for assemblies, 
With yard man 
Painting, . 
On roads, . 
Weaving, . 
Mason, 
Carpenter, 
Boiler house, 
Bakery, 
Store, 
Clerical, . 
Farm : — 

Such work as apple picking, barn, vegetable garden 
clearing land, cutting brush, ditching, teaming 
tending sheep, tending cows, milking, with gar 
dener. 



17 

2 



1 

3 
12 
10 

3 
60 
70 

1 

4 
4 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
2 
2 

17 



Totals, 



26 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Amusements. 

Dances, 44 ; masquerade, 1 : readings and impersonations, 
7 ; illustrated lectures, 2 ; lectures, 2 ; sessions of dancing 
school, 29 ; entertainments, legerdemain, 3 ; entertainment, 
crayon drawings, 1 ; entertainment, local talent, 1 ; musi- 
cales, 2 ; phonograph concerts, 2 ; excursions to Forest Lake, 
32 : excursions to fair, 4; excursion to circus, 1 ; excursion to 
ball game, 1; picnics, 4; car rides, 10; sleigh rides, 10; 
carriage rides, 59. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



► 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 27 



ARTICLES MADE 


IN 


THE SEWING ROOM. 


Sheets made, 


736 


Neckties made, 


24 


Pillow cases made, 


675 


Garters made, pairs, 


239 


Bed ticks made, . 


69 


Aprons made, 


174 


Pillow ticks made, 


15 


Night dresses made, . 


6 


Rubber pillow covers made, 


O 1 

ol 


Bathing caps made, 


8 


Table cloths made, 


81 


Splashers made, . 


3 


Napkins made, 


309 


Screens covered, . 


4 


Doilies made, 


18 


Mangle aprons made, . 


16 


Tray cloths made, 


32 


Chemises made, . 


7 


Curtains made, 


49 


Petticoat made, 


1 


Sash curtains made, pairs, . 


26 


Santa Claus suit made, 


1 


Curtains for bookcases made, 




Piano cover made, 


1 


pairs, 


7 


Holders made, 


5 


Curtains for register made, . 


8 


Strainers made, . 


6 


Bureau covers made, . 


38 


Blankets hemmed, 


16 


Towels made, 


1,896 


Covers for dentist's chairs, 




m Till n 1 

Towels, double roller, made, 


148 


sets, . . . . . 


7 


Towels, single roller, made, 


524 


Canvas wagon cover made, . 


1 


Clothes bags made, 


99 


Cushion for window seat, . 


1 


Mail bags made, . 


3 


Cushion cover for window 




Tea and coffee bags made, . 


25 


seat, 


1 


Rugs made, .... 


98 


Trousers shortened, pairs, . 


62 


Sofa pillows made, 


1 


Sleeves shortened, pairs, 


7 


Dusters made, 


31 


Sleeves lengthened, pairs, . 


12 


Floor swabs made, 


35 


Bed ticks cut, 


60 


Portieres made, pairs, . 


2 


Chemises cut, 


7 


Coats made, .... 


3 


Night dresses cut, 


6 


Shirts made, .... 


138 


Drawers cut, pairs, 


96 


Undershirts made, 


60 


Under shirts cut, . 


82 


Nightshirts made, 


177 


Shirts cut, .... 


175 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


72 


Coats cut, .... 


3 


Denim socks made, pairs, 


6 


Night shirts cut, . 


184 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


107 







28 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct, 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 

WARDS. 



Aprons made, 


225 


Dressing sacks made, . 


6 


Chemises made, . 


1 1 A 
110 


Aprons mended, . 


143 


Corset covers made, 


176 


Coats mended, 


3 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


53 


Chemises mended, 


30 


Dresses made, 


194 


Corset covers mended, . 


124 


Night dresses made, . 


110 


Drawers mended, pairs, 


276 


Petticoats made, . 


75 


Dresses mended, . 


326 


Shirt waists made, 


35 


Hoods mended, 


16 


Bandages, T, made, 


12 


Mittens mended, pairs, 


2 


Clothes bags made, 


18 


Night dresses mended, 


317 


Curtains made, 


2 


Petticoats mended, 


249 


Dusters made, 


100 


Undervests mended, 


247 


Floor swabs made, 


83 


Stockings mended, pairs, 


. 3,492 


Holders made, 


61 


Trousers mended, pairs, 


1 


Towels made, 


344 


Blankets mended, 


14 


Arm slings made, 


2 


Towels mended, . 


450 


Napkins made, 


68 


Dress skirt mended, 


1 


Draw sheets made, 


4 


Pillow cases mended, . 


135 


Sofa pillows made, 


4 


Sheets mended, . 


10 


Mattress covers made, . 


11 


Arm slings mended, 


5 


Camisole made, . 


1 


Pieces mended, . 


. 2,197 


Surgical garments made, 


13 







1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



29 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED EST THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOMS. 



Shoes made, pairs, 


237 


Weekly paper printed, copies, 


2,400 


Slippers made, pairs, . 


195 


Blanks printed, . 


79,160 


Brooms made, 


52 


Pamphlets printed, 


3,275 


Rope rugs made, . 


35 


Hair picked, pounds, . 


2,800 


Mattress covers made, . 


38 


Tin name holders made, 


39 


Camp stools made, 


55 


Shoes mended, pairs, . 


846 


Cribbage board made, . 


1 


Shoes marked, pairs, . 


94 


Pill envelopes made, • 


9,700 


Suspenders repaired, pairs, . 


7 


Screens made, 


3 


Umbrellas repaired, 


84 


Flower stand made, 


1 


Blankets eyeletted, 


6 


Report board made, 


1 


Harnesses repaired, 


49 


Dirt boxes made, . 


2 


Horse blanket repaired, 


1 


Small boxes made, 


18 


Pillows renovated, 


1,029 


Rat trap made, 


1 


Chairs repaired, . 


6 


Rustic benches made, . 


11 


Chairs reseated, . 


35 


Wooden head marks carved, 


3 


Baskets repaired, . 


19 


Wooden door plates carved, 


3 


Step-ladders repaired, . 


2 


Wooden numbers carved, 


40 


Screens repaired, . 


57 


Picture frames made, . 


2 


Stools repaired, . 


3 


Blackboard erasers made, . 


10 


Rugs repaired, 


7 


Hammer handles made, 


40 


Whip repaired, 


1 


Pillows made, 


36 


Straight jacket repaired, 


1 


Petticoats made, . 


24 


Belt repaired, 


1 


Aprons made, 


22 


Muzzle baskets repaired, 


2 


Night dresses made, 


25 


Barber chair repaired, . 


1 


Chemises made, . 


3 


Clothespress repaired, . 


1 


Coats made, . . • . 


149 


Mattresses repaired, 


2 


Vests made, .... 


87 


Medicine closet repaired, 


1 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


146 


Towel rack repaired, . 


1 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


100 


Chair cushion repaired, 


1 


Jumpers made, 


10 


Rocking-horse repaired, 


1 


Towels made, 


1,345 


Boxes covered for office, 


102 


Bandages made, . 


68 


Base balls repaired, 


2 


Oven cloths made, 


24 


Base ball jacket repaired, . 


1 


Dish towels made, 


180 


Suit case repaired, 


1 


Swab cloths made, 


169 


Cushion patterns marked, . 


5 


Dusters made, 


51 


Pieces mended, 


7,550 



30 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



FAEM PEODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1903, to Oct. 1, 1904. 



Milk, 203,450 quarts, $10,172 50 

Eggs, 117 \ dozen 29 31 

Hay, 233 tons, 4,194 00 

Meadow hay, 30 tons 300 00 

Rowen hay, 36 tons, 432 00 

Rye straw, 2 tons 40 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons 900 00 

Green fodder, 103 tons, 309 00 

Rhubarb, 3,854 pounds, 154 16 

Strawberries, 335 quarts, 40 20 

Currants, 283 quarts, 28 30 

Lettuce, 2,900 heads, 58 00 

Green peas, 78 bushels, 97 50 

Radishes, 5 bushels, 10 00 

Cucumbers, 4,816, : 96 32 

Cucumbers for pickles, 2f bushels, 4 12 

Sweet corn, 11,275 ears, 112 75 

Tomatoes, ripe, 82£ bushels, 82 50 

Tomatoes, green, 22 bushels, 11 00 

Pears, 13 bushels, 13 00 

Crab apples, 15 bushels, 15 00 

Apples, 1,000 barrels, 1,000 00 

Cider apples, 1,500 bushels, 120 00 

Summer squash, 2,900 pounds, 72 50 

Winter squash, 4 tons, 80 00 

Beans, 116£ bushels, ' . . 124 00 

Pumpkins, 7 loads, 21 00 

Horse radish, 5 bushels, 4 00 

Peppers, 1 bushel, 1 00 

Potatoes, 1,500 bushels 900 00 

Cabbage, 10 tons, 200 00 

Turnips, 150 bushels, 60 00 

Beets, 350 bushels, 180 00 

Carrots, 600 bushels, 300 00 

Onions, 385 bushels, 288 75 



Amount carried forward, $20,450 91 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — 



No. 62. 



31 



Amount brought forward, 120,450 91 

Broom corn, 12 00 

Blackberries, 50 quarts, 5 00 

Parsnips, 750 bushels, 562 50 

Grapes, 200 pounds 6 00 

Plums, 3 bushels, 4 50 

Greens, 59* bushels, 29 75 

Rye, 40 bushels, 24 00 

Wool, 304 pounds, 60 80 

Pork, 4,488 pounds, 314 16 

Unrendered lard, 82* pounds, 5 77 

Beef , 483 pounds, . . . . 33 81 

Fowl, 65 pounds, 9 10 

Chicken, 49* pounds, 7 92 

Duck, 23* pounds 2 62 

Lamb, 1,463* pounds, 198 24 

Veal, 794* pounds, 86 21 

Pigs sold, 62 162 00 

Calves sold, 25, .......... 87 00 

Cabbage sold, 31 pounds, 31 

Cabbage plants sold, 1,000, 1 50 

Beets sold, * bushel, 30 

Carrots sold, 1 bushel, 1 00 

Squash sold, 40 pounds, 40 

Wool sold, 804 pounds, 160 80 

Vegetables from greenhouse : — 

Beans, 10* bushels, 10 50 

Squashes, 2, 20 

Lettuce, 435 heads, 8 70 

Spinach, 1 bushel, 1 00 

Cucumbers, 1,634 81 70 

Onions, 1 bushel, 75 

Turnips, 21 bushels, 8 40 

Carrots, 1* bushels, 75 

Tomatoes, 7 bushels, 7 00 

Cucumbers for pickles, 5 bushels, 7 50 

Peas, 3 bushels, 3 75 

Radishes, 3 bushels, 6 00 

Corn, 353 ears, 3 50 

Grapes, 1 peck, ... * 25 

Peppers, * bushel, 50 

Pumpkins, 4, 20 

Celery, 374 heads, 37 34 

Strawberries, 68 quarts, 8 16 

Eggs, 26* dozen, 15 62 

Cabbage, 19 bushels, 9 50 



$22,437 92 



32 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, . 
Assistant physicians (2), per year 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Treasurer, j^er year, . 
Clerk, per year, . 
Stenographer, per month, . 
Office assistant, per month, 
Steward, per year, 
Drug clerk, per month, 
Supervisor (woman), per month, 
Assistant supervisor (woman), per month 
Supervisor (man), per month, . 
Night nurses (women, 5), per month 
Nurses (women, 18), per month, 
Night nurses (men, 6), per month, 
Nurses (men, 22), per month, . 
Engineer, per year, . 
Assistant engineer, per month, . 
Helper, per month, 
Firemen (4) , per year, 
Baker, per month, 
Kitchen man, per month, . 
Store assistant, per month, 
Handy man, per month, 
Cooks (5), per month, 
Assistant cooks (5), per month, 
Table girls (4), per month, 
Foreman industrial room, per month, 
Seamstress, per month, 



$3,000 00 
1,200 00 
800 00 
300 00 
600 00 
30 00 
16 00 
1,000 00 

25 00 
28 00 

26 00 
37 00 

$14 00-18 00 
16 00-22 00 
20 00-25 00 
20 00-30 00 
1,000 00 
50 00 
35 00 
$25 00-28 00 
46 00 
23 00 
30 00 
34 00 
$16 00-30 00 
14 00-18 00 
14 00-18 00 
45 00 
30 00 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 33 

Assistant seamstresses (3), per month, . . . . $14 00-20 00 

Laundress, per month, 22 00 

Laundryman, per month, 30 00 

Assistant laundresses (5), per month, .... $14 00-18 00 

Farmer, per year, 1 ,000 00 

Assistant farmers (11), per month, $20 00-30 00 

Assistant farmer, without board, per month, .... 50 00 

Gardener, per month, 27 00 

Assistant gardener, per month, 23 00 

Driver, per month, 35 00 

Head carpenter, per day, 2 75 

Assistant carpenters (3) , per day, 2 50 

Painter, per day, 2 00 



34 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



GENEKAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent; in this case the approval of a judge 
is required, in addition to the physicians' certificates and the 
notification of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to 
bed early. These restrictions are not irksome when they are 
fully understood, and can be complied with easily. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the Xew London north- 
ern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware Kiver branch 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in Palmer, 
the other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, 
and the railroad fare is $1.90. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



35 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The report of the finances of this hospital for the year ending- 
Sept. 30, 1904, is respectfully submitted herewith. 



Assets. 

Real estate : — 

Cultivated land, 113 acres, .... $17,311 00 

Woodland, 21 acres, . • 1,465 00 

Pasturage, 104 acres, 4,487 00 

Farm (under appropriation 1901), viz. : — 

Cultivated land, 40 acres, .... 1,600 00 

Woodland, 50 acres, 1,100 00 

Pasturage, 30 acres 300 00 

Farm (under appropriation 1903), viz. : — 

Cultivated land, 50 acres, .... 933 51 

Woodland, 190 acres, 2,850 00 

Pasturage, 60 acres 900 00 

Water and sewerage systems, .... 37,638 63 

Outside electric lighting (farm group), . . 800 00 

Quarry, 450 00 

$69,835 14 

Buildings : — 

Original buildings, . . . . . $38,520 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1895), . . 84,400 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . . 86,200 00 

Nurses 1 home, > (under appropriation 1902), 26,300 00 
Electric building, S 

Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), . 4,600 00 

Laundry (under appropriation 1901), . . 9,500 00 

Greenhouse 2,100 00 

Farm group (under appropriation 1903), viz. : — 

Nos. 1 and 2, 27,212 52 

No. 3 6,248 38 

Barns, 2,827 97 

Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), . 700 00 

288,608 87 



Amount carried forward, $358,444 01 



36 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Amount brought forward, $358,444 01 

Personal estate : — 

Live stock on the farm, $9,192 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 10,405 02 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 4,037 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . 44,548 11 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 11,403 68 

Other furniture in inmates' department, . . 17,897 08 
Personal property of State in administration 

building, 6,481 21 

Personal property of State in employees' cot- 
tage, 1,518 05 

Personal property of State in nurses' home, . 3,162 18 

Personal property of State in farm group No. 3, 582 36 

Personal property of State in greenhouse, . 1,057 08 

Ready-made clothing, 1,875 86 

Dry goods, 3,720 55 

Provisions and groceries, 1,514 84 

Drugs and medicines, 2,306 68 

Instruments and laboratory fittings, . . 1,893 42 

Fuel, 13,210 95 

Library, 650 00 

Other supplies undistributed, .... 6,002 83 

141,458 90 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1903, 

Received from State on special appropriations: — 

Laundry building and machinery, 1901, . . $23 06 

Furnishing new buildings, 1901, . . . 108 27 

Electric building and machinery, 1902, . . 1,015 56 

Nurses' home, 1902, 1,228 46 

Repairs and alterations old buildings, 1903, . 2,184 7C 

Water, sewerage and outside lighting, 1903, . 5,084 92 

New buildings, 1903, 29,973 64 

Repairs and improvements, 1904, . . . 4,038 51 

Total from appropriations, . . . 

Received from State for maintenance, . . $107,565 05 
Received from towns for support of patients, . 38,015 63 
Received from individuals for support of pa- 
tients 5,704 69 

Received from soldiers' relief for support of 

patients 255 34 

Received from reimbursements for support of 

patients, 338 01 

Received from interest on bank deposit, . . 144 52 



$499,902 91 
$5,460 27 



43,657 12 



Amounts carried forward, . . . $152,023 24 $49,117 39 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 37 

Amounts brought forward, . . . . $152,023 24 §49,117 39 

Received from farm and farm products, . . 412 07 

Received from store, 711 84 

Received from rent, 66 50 

Received from barrels, junk and sundries, . 165 16 

Received from account expenses patients, . 63 66 

153,442 47 



Total receipts, $202,559 86 

Expenditures. 

Salaries, wages and labor, $40,200 55 

Food : — 

Butter, . $3,134 77 

Butterine, 28 00 

Beans, 30 82 

Bread and crackers, 269 53 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., 620 73 

Cheese, 45 91 

Eggs 1,298 72 

Flour, * . . . 3,545 35 

Fish, 844 92 

Dried and fresh fruit, 902 56 

Meats, 4,533 61 

Milk, 24 01 

Molasses and syrup, 583 61 

Sugar, 1,003 08 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, .... 278 82 

Vegetables, 1,438 84 

Sundries, 640 00 

19,223 28 

Clothing and clothing material : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, ..... $121 96 

Clothing, 621 96 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, . 1,027 39 

Hats and caps, 24 25 

Leather and shoe findings, .... 489 74 

Sundries, 58 

2,285 88 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . . . $1,236 38 

Brushes, brooms, etc , 118 05 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 216 97 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . . . 377 67 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 191 21 

Kitchen furnishings, 302 44 



Amounts carried forward, . . . . $2,442 72 $61,709 71 



38 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Woodenware, buckets, pails, etc , 
Sundries, 



Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, 

Electricity, 

Gas, 

Oil, 



$2,442 72 $61,709 71 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies, . 
Carriages, wagons and repairs, 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., 
Hay, grain, etc., 
Harness and repairs, 
Horses, 
Cows, 

Other live stock, 
Labor (not on pay roll), 
Rent, .... 
Tools, farm machines, etc 
Sundries, . 



Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc., . 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressage and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, 

Hose, etc., 

Labor (not on pay roll), . 
Medicines and hospital supplies, 



Amounts carried forward, 



44 52 
119 85 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., .... 
Electrical work and supplies, . 

Hardware, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., .... 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 
Roofing and materials, 
Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll) 

Boiler, 

Sundries, 



$13,366 94 
518 14 
258 34 
142 31 



$145 50 
426 97 
158 07 
480 35 
581 43 

2,129 80 
450 40 

1,088 86 

3,328 64 
5 06 
944 97 
654 00 
190 64 



$348 12 
276 85 
540 10 

3,613 02 
235 85 
790 00 
710 00 
192 50 
281 42 
25 00 
447 42 
152 03 



$340 49 
701 69 

1,437 02 
61 00 
656 20 
431 98 

2,587 29 



2,607 09 



14,285 73 



10,584 69 



7,612 31 



$6,215 67 $96,799 53 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 39 



Amounts brought forward,. . . . $6,215 67 $96,799 53 

Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra),. . 35 00 

Postage, 267 59 

Printing and printing supplies, ... 79 18 

Return of runaways, 32 63 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 836 81 

Stationery and office supplies, .... 314 93 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 597 03 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 415 54 

Tobacco, 355 58 

Water, 782 28 

Printing annual report, 181 24 

Sundries, 652 04 

10,765 52 



Total expenses for maintenance, $107,565 05 

Other expenses on special appropriations, .... 43,657 12 
Paid State Treasurer, 48,020 70 



Total expenditures, $199,242 87 

Cash on hand Sept, 30, 1904, 3,316 99 



$202,559 86 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, $3,316 99 

Balance for maintenance with State Treasurer, 28,316 29 
Bills receivable for board, .... 9,528 28 

Other bills receivable, 11 50 

Unexpended special appropriations, . . 6,777 18 
Patients 1 funds on deposit, .... 537 23 

Nurses 1 training school fund, .... 18 31 

Expenses account of patients, .... 19 58 

$48,525 36 

Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, $3,195 25 

Miscellaneous bills unpaid, .... 4,498 87 

Patients 1 funds, 537 23 

Nurses 1 training school fund, .... 18 31 

8,249 66 



$40,275 70 

Dividing the total expenditures for maintenance ($107,565.05) 
by the average number of patients (450.04), shows an an- 
nual cost per patient of . $239 01 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of ... 4 57 



40 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 1904. 



Statement of Appropriations. 





Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
this Year. 


Balance 
Available. 


Laundry building and machinery, 


$9,500 00 


$9,476 94 


$23 06 




Furnishing new buildings 


20,000 00 


19,891 73 


108 27 




Nurses' home 


20,000 00 


18,747 74 


1,228 46 


$23 80 


Electric building and machinery, 


19,000 00 


17,984 44 


1,015 56 




Repairs, alterations and furnishings, 


4,000 00 


1,799 23 


2,184 70 


16 07 


New buildings and furnishing, . 


30,000 00 


24 91 


29,973 64 


1 45 


Water, sewage and outside lighting, . 


6,000 00 


140 71 


5,084 92 


774 37 


Repairs and improvements, 


9,640 00 




3,678 51 


5,961 49 




250 00 




250 00 






110 00 




110 00 






$118,500 00 


$68,065 70 


$43,657 12 


$6,777 18 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 



Nov. 5, 1904. 

I have compared the treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1904;, with the hooks kept at the institution, and rind them to 
agree. Receipts for board, care, etc., to the amount of $48,020.70 have been turned 
in to the State Treasurer, for which his vouchers are on file. The cash account is 
correctly cast, and shows a balance in the hands of the treasurer as follows: — 



September receipts for board, care, etc., .... $661 16 

Former receipts to be accounted for, 2,655 83 

Money belonging to patients, 537 23 

Nurses' training school fund, 18 31 



$3,872 53 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $1,917 51 

Cash vouchers not entered 1,902 44 

Cash in safe at hospital, 52 58 



$3,872 53 



GEO. L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



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44 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



Cases admitted. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


INSANE. 


SANE. 


TOTALS. 






















Males. 


s 

CO 


Totals. 


Males. 


■ 

"3 
S 

CD 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females 


Totals. 


First, . . '. 


13 


9 


22 


51 


31 


82 


64 


40 


104 


Second, 


6 


4 


10 


6 


4 


10 


12 


8 


20 


Third, 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


3 


1 


4 


Fourth 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Total cases, 


21 


15 


36 


59 


35 


94 


80 


50 


130 


Total persons, . 


21 


15 


36 


56 


35 


91 


77 


50 


127 


First admitted to any hospital, 


7 


4 


11 


48 


30 


78 


55 


34 


89 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62 



45 





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ates, .... 














m 
a 




•• — 

>rtug? 
iland, 










Massachusetts, 
Other New Engk 
Other States, . 


Total native, 


Other countriet 
Canada, . 
England, . 
Germany, 
Ireland, . 
New Brunswick, 
Newfoundland, 
Nova Scotia, . 
jrico isiana on tri 
Poland, . 
Prince Edward If 
Russia, . 
Scotland, . 
Sweden, . 
Switzerland, . 


Total foreign 
Unknown, 


Totals, 



46 HOSPITAL FOB, EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





iNSANh 




Sane. 


Totals 




COUNTIES. 




2 






■ 






X 






■ 


1 


an 




1 


x 


! ™ 


"3 






"3 


a 

fa 


Tota 


"3 
g 


B 
9 
fa 


3 
g 


3 


B 


3 

i 


Ucl JVolIlI • ■ • • 


- 






1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


Bristol, 




: 




3 


1 


4 


3 


1 


4 


Essex, 


1 


- 


1 


5 


6 


11 


6 


6 


12 


Franklin, 








1 




1 


1 




1 


Hampden, 


4 


3 


7 


6 


3 


9 


10 


6 


16 


Hampshire, .... 










2 


2 




2 


2 


Middlesex, .... 


4 


1 


5 


It 


5 


16 


15 


6 


21 


Norfolk, 


1 




1 


3 


2 


5 


4 


2 


6 


Plymouth, .... 




1 


1 


3 


1 


4 


3 


2 


5 


Suffolk 


5 


5 


10 


18 


9 


27 


23 


14 


37 


Worcester, .... 


2 




2 


8 


4 


12 


10 


4 


14 


Totals, .... 


17 


10 


27 


59 


35 


94 


76 


45 


121 


Cities or towns (10,000 or over), 


8 


6 


14 


49 


31 


80 


57 


37 


94 


Country districts (under 10,000), 


9 


4 


13 


10 


4 


14 


19 


8 


27 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hosjyital. 





In sake. 


Sane. 


Totals. 












X 

V 






X 






sS 


3 




v* 


3 


X 


X 


3 


X 




3 
S 


S 

o 

fa 


3 

o 


3 


a 

9 
fa 


3 

O 

fr> 


w 

3 
£ 


a 
g 


Tota 


Unmarried, .... 


5 


3 


8 


35 


23 


58 


40 


26 


66 


Married, . . . . 


2 




2 


12 


6 


18 


14 


6 


20 


Widowed, .... 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 










































Totals, .... 


7 


4 


11 


48 


30 


78 


55 


34 


89 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 47 

6. — Occupations of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



MALES. 





I 


a 


s 

o 




c 


o 








a 


aa 


H 






cS 

GO 


o 
H 


Blacksmith, 


1 




1 


Salesman, 




1 


1 


Butcher, 




1 


1 


Shipper, . 




1 


1 


Carpenters, 




2 


2 


Shoemakers, . 




4 


4 


Clerk, 






1 


Stenographer, . 




1 


1 


Farmer, 






1 


Teamster, 




1 


1 


Laborers, . 






8 


Window cleaner, 


1 




1 


Machinist,.. 






1 


Woolen dresser, 


1 




1 


Mechanic, . 
Merchant, . 






1 
1 












Totals, 


4 


30 


34 


Operatives, 


1 




5 


Unknown, 


3 


18 


21 


Printer, 






1 






















Painter, 






1 


Totals, 


7 


48 


55 



FEMALES. 



Domestics, . 




7 


7 


Students, . 




2 


2 


Dressmaker, 


1 




1 


Waitress, . 




1 


1 


Housewives, 
Laundress, 




3 
1 


3 
1 










Totals, 


2 


20 


22 


Operatives, 




4 


4 


Unknown, 


2 


10 


12 


Saleswoman, 
Seamstresses, . 




1 
1 


1 










1 


2 


Totals, 


4 


30 


34 



WIFE OK DAUGHTER OF — 



Carpenter, . 




1 


1 


Paper hanger, . 




1 




Clerks, 




2 


2 


Painter, . 


1 






Cook 


1 




1 


Printer, . 




1 




Farmer, 




1 


1 


Shoemaker, 




1 




Laborer, 




1 


1 


Stone polisher, 




1 




Machinists, 




2 


2 


Tailor, . 




1 




Mechanic, . 
Operatives, 




1 
1 


1 

2 










1 


Totals, 


3 


14 


17 



48 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 

7. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any 

Hospital. 



Predisposing Causes. 



EXCITING CAUSES. 


Admitted. 


HEREDITARY 
TENDENCY. 


NEUROTIC 
TENDENCY. 


INTEM- 
PERANCE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


m 

Ol 


* 
• 


03 
O 


X 

5 


■2 
s 

£ 


| Totals. 


Males. 


o 
a 
S 

fa 


Totals. 


Insane. 

ray eicai . — 


























Amputation of arm, 


1 


- 


1 












- 


- 




- 




- 


1 


1 






















1 


2 


3 
















1 


1 


Mental : — 


























Worry, 


1 


- 


1 


— 







— 


— 


- 


1 




1 




3 


3 


6 














1 


1 


2 




4 


1 


5 














1 




1 




7 


4 


11 


— 







— 






2 


1 


3 


Sane. 


























A lpriVinliam 

- 1 1 IU 11 U 1 1 B III t • • ■ • • 


3 




3 


i 


- 


1 


- 


- 




2 


- 


2 


Chronic pachymeningitis^ . • 




1 


1 
























1 


1 
















1 


1 


E x cite m en t 




1 


1 




















Hy stcrectomy , • . • ■ 




1 


1 
























1 


1 
























1 


1 




















Overwork • . 


3 


2 


5 














1 


- 


1 




























Trauma 


15 


5 


20 


i 


1 


2 


- 


- 




3 


- 


3 


\f onto] ■ 




























2 


1 


3 










































































26 


14 


40 


2 


1 


3 








6 


1 


7 




22 


16 


38 


2 


3 


5 


2 


2 


4 


3 


1 


' 4 




48 


30 


78 


4 


4 


8 


2 


2 


4 


9 


2 


11 


Aggregates 


29 


17 


46 


2 


1 


3 








7 


2 


9 




26 


17 


43 


2 


3 


5 


2 


2 


4 


4 


1 


5 




55 


34 


89 


4 


4 


8 


2 


2 


4 


11 


3 


14 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62, 



49 



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1904. 



PUBLIC 



DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



51 







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TOTALS. 


EPILEPSY. 


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HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



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1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 53 



11. — Causes of Death. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 




















Amyotrophic lateral 
sclerosis, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Cerebral anemia, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Cerebral hemorrhage, 


1 




1 








1 




1 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


Exhaustion from epilepsy, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Psychical epilepsy, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


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4 


2 


6 


1 


2 


3 


5 


4 


9 


Circulatory system : — 




















Acute cardiac dilatation, . 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Cardiac paralysis, . 








1 




1 


1 




1 


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1 


1 




1 


1 


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X 


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the lungs, . . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Lobar pneumonia, . 


1 




1 








1 




1 


General : — 




















Septicemia, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Tuberculosis, pulmonary, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Totals,. 


9 


4 


13 


3 


9 


12 


12 


13 


25 



54 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



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1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 




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PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital foe Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 
FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1905. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1906. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



Xo. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS: SttT X 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION. PALMER), 

FOR THE 

Year ending September 30, 1905. 




BOSTON 3 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1906. 

L 

K 



^AN31 1921 

STATE HOUSE^BOSTON 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



3 



CONTEXTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, 5 

Trustees' Report 7 

Superintendent's Report, 10 

Articles made in the Sewing Room, 19 

Articles made and repaired in the Wards 20 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Rooms, ... 21 

Farm Products, 23 

List of Persons regularly employed, 25 

General Information, 27 

Treasurer's Report 28 

Statistical Tables, 35 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital foe Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, 
CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary, 
MABEL W. STEDMAN, . 
HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D., 
WINFORD N. CALDWELL, . 
MARY P. TOWNSLEY, . 



Boston. 

Groton. 

Brookline. 

Lenox. 

Dalton. 

Springfield. 

Springfield. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., . 
ARTHUR O. MORTON, M.D., 
MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D. 
EDWARD A. KENNEDY, M.D. 
LILLIAN M. KINCAID, 
MARY W. WENTWORTH. 
CHARLES F. SIMONDS, 
GEORGE E. BATES, . 
J. WESLEY WILLIAMS, 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Clerk. 

Stenographer. 

Steward and Storekeeper. 

Engineer. 

Farmer. 



TREASURER. 

CHARLES B. FISKE, 

Office at the Hospital. 



Palmer. 



Cmnmontoealtk of Blassacbusctts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics at 
Monsou respectfully submit the following report : — 

The past year has afforded no striking or remarkable events 
in the affairs of the hospital, but there has been a gradual 
increase in the number of patients and in the hospital plant. 

Dr. William N. Bullard was reappointed trustee this year, 
so that the Board of Trustees has remained unchanged. 

Dr. Bansoni A. Greene, a second assistant physician, has 
resigned to engage in private practice, and his resignation has 
been accepted. Dr. Edward A. Kennedy has been appointed 
assistant physician, and is now on duty. 

In view of the marked increase in the number of patients 
and of the additional work involved on this account, it has 
seemed advisable to appoint an additional assistant physician, 
makino- four in all, and the trustees now have under consider- 
ation candidates for the vacant place. 

The increase in the number of patients in the hospital has 
gone on steadily this year. On Sept. 30, 1904, we had 459, 
and the daily average of patients for the preceding year was 
450.04. On Sept. 30, 1905, we had 521 patients, and the 
daily average for the year then ending was 490.23. This 
increase has led to crowding, and there have been lately 56 
floor beds, chiefly in the male wards. This is not advisable, 
and the trustees are not satisfied in regard to it. It is ex- 
pected that this overcrowding will be relieved so far as the 
men are concerned on the opening of the new building for 
male patients next spring. The principle of overcrowding is 
a bad one. It is more or less forced upon the trustees. No 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Board can provide well or arrange well for a larger number of 
inmates than their accommodations are made for. It is not 
suitable or just that any Board (except in case of emergency) 
should be expected to provide for 150 or even 125 patients in 
a building built for 100, and where an appropriation was made 
for a building for 100 only. 

The hospital was granted last year an appropriation of 
$80,000 for a building for 100 men. This sum included the 
expense for erecting, heating, lighting, plumbing and furnish- 
ing said building, and in general putting it into suitable con- 
dition for use. As the appropriation was passed so late in the 
session, it was not possible to start early in the work; but the 
building is now fairly advanced, the walls well up, and we 
hope to be able to occupy it next spring or early summer. 

This building was made with many single rooms, in order to 
accommodate the more noisy and troublesome male patients, 
who often for a time must be separated from the others. 

The Board, after much consideration, has decided to ask 
this year for a similar sum for the erection, furnishing, etc., of 
a similar building for the women. A class of female patients, 
corresponding to that of the men now being provided for, de- 
mand a like provision. These women cannot comfortably be 
kept with the other female patients. They are noisy, violent 
at times, more or less dangerous and disturbing, and they are 
exceedingly apt to be quarrelsome. Moreover, they complain 
constantly, partly from actual delusions or exaggerations of 
ideas, partly from the general unbalance and irritability caused 
by or accompanying the disease ; and they are apt to disturb, 
to excite and to stir up the others, who are themselves in a 
more or less susceptible condition. 

It has long been desired to move our barns from their present 
situation directly in front of the administration building to a 
more appropriate and convenient place on the main road, near 
the other farm buildings, and the Board believe that the present 
year would be a suitable time to undertake this work. We 
also need a proper stable for the horses, apart from the cattle 
barns. 

A considerable amount of work has been accomplished on 
the grounds by the patients in grading, filling, stone-breaking, 
making concrete walks and gardening. It is advisable, as one 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



of the most important aids to health, that each patient should 
do what he can. Occupation, especially open-air occupation, 
is perhaps our most valuable therapeutic measure. The full 
statement of what has been made in the industrial room and in 
the sewing rooms will be found in the superintendent's report. 

Eeference was made in the report last year to the extreme 
care necessary to obtain good and reliable attendants and 
nurses. Unceasing attention is given to this matter, and when- 
ever any question of doubt as to character or as to treatment 
of patients by an attendant, arises, it is our policy to consider 
that such attendant is no longer available for the institution. 
On the other hand, statements made by certain patients must 
be verified, as they are not fully responsible mentally. 

A list of the medical publications and research work pub- 
lished this year will be found in the superintendent's report. 
It is not possible yet that as much time as we should desire 
can be given to this class of work, as the routine work, the 
care and treatment of patients must come first. 

It is hopjsd that before long we may be able to have an 
officer who can devote himself entirely to the clinical and 
practical study of the prevention, treatment and cure of epi- 
lepsy. For this purpose it will be necessary to have one as- 
sistant who shall have few or no routine duties. 

In the work done by the hospital the training school plays 
an important part. There is now a graduated three years' 
course for nurses. Male attendants are allowed a certificate 
of work at two years or three years, according to the actual 
time spent. 

The list of appropriations for which the trustees petition 
this year is as follows : — 

Building for 100 women, $80,000 

Work on bams, including fireproof walls, 8,000 

Stone crusher, 2,000 

Improvement of grounds, 1,000 

Stable, Amount to be determined later. 

A full explanation of the advisability of the last three items 
will be found in the superintendent's report. 



WILLIAM N. BULLARD, 

For the Trustees. 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 
The following report is respectfully submitted. The work 



of this year is represented in detail b}' 


the table 


herewith 


appended : — 

- 






Number of patients Sept. 30, 1904, 




. 459 


Since admitted : — 






Sane 1 (8 from visit, 3 from escape), . 




102 


Insane (5 from visit, 2 from escape), . 




57 


Discharged and on visit c — 






Sane. — Much improved, .... 


. 12 




Improved, ..... 


. 10 




Not improved, 


. 13 




Died, 


. 11 




On visit 


. 15 




Escaped, 


2 


63 


Insane. — Recovered, 


1 


Much improved, .... 


1 




Improved, 


. 5 




Not improved, .... 


. . 2 




Died, 


. 13 




Transferred, 


4 




On visit, 


7 




Escaped, 


1 








34 


Number of patients remaining Sept. 30, 1905, . 




521 


Daily average of patients, 




490.23 


Per capita cost (per week), 




$ 4 56 



The difficulty in keeping our patients cheerfully and suit- 
ably employed is a subject which I have discussed every year, 
and I find it still one of our most difficult problems. Patients 
with this disorder are nearly all disinclined to make physical 
exertion. They have been taught through their early years 
that they are invalids, and have largely lost the capacity for 



1 Three insane and 8 sane persons nominally admitted for discharge. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



11 



holding themselves to a task when not feeling in prime con- 
dition. They make much of a slight indisposition, and are 
easily driven from the assigned labor by trivial things, such as 
an uncomfortable degree of heat or cold, windy weather or 
threatening rain. 

Another matter of very serious purport is the question of 
feeding our patients. This has been carefully studied, and 
many problems connected with it have been to a degree 
solved, but much is still to be done in this line. In gen- 
eral, I think it may be stated that a diet which is wholesome, 
palatable, of ordinary kinds of food, well cooked, is not harm- 
ful. Our patients have often to be taught to partake of their 
food with moderation, at regular intervals and with thorough 
insalivation. 

The question of contentment among the patients at this 
institution is one which attracts the attention of the interested 
officer to a large degree. We find that the proportion of dis- 
contented cases is not large. Those who do manifest this 
disposition, it is often found, have shown the same difficult 
traits at home, and have not been sent to us until conditions 
there have become intolerable. These patients have to be 
carefully considered here, and their demands met to as large a 
degree as possible. I am glad to say, however, that in the 
majority of instances our patients manifest a disposition to co- 
operate cheerfully, and evince appreciation and contentment. 
They are nearly all hopeful, and do not become much de- 
pressed over the distressing malady from which they suffer. 

At the greenhouse a small family of men who are by them- 
selves has been established for some months. At Farm Cottage 
the house will soon be in condition to care for a similar family. 
The isolated small families seem advantageous for some who 
have definite occupations. Larger groups, such as the farm 
group, are already fully tested . It seems to me that the policy 
of separation into groups or single families, and independent 
management for each, is a good one for us to continue ; but 
this of course applies only to buildings outside of the main 
group, where the service buildings are clustered, and where 
are to be housed within a radius of 1,000 feet about 500 of the 
cases needing custody or daily treatment. 



12 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Dr. John A. Furbish this year and Dr. Leroy M. S. Miner 
last year acted most acceptably as dentists during the entire 
summer season. Thanks are due them for valuable aid, both 
for the work the} 7 did and for the instruction furnished to our 
training class. 

The medical work already done has been fully reported. 
That of this year is less in published results, but actually 
much greater than ever before. 

A system for work has been carried on this year as formerly, 
but much more completely. I hope to develop this so that 
the daily clinics and staff consultations will be located in a 
special part of the hospital, where all new cases may come 
and where the training class may meet. One man now has the 
main care of new cases, laboratory work, etc., and he will de- 
velop into a trained clinician and pathologist, with definite, 
independent duties, aside from the administrative. 

Among the items which I present to your Board as the most 
pressing of our needs for this year, I wish especially to mention 
the conditions which make necessary the stable and the stone 
crusher. Our hillside roads and walks are very hard to keep 
from washing during wet weather. Much has been done in 
putting in cross-drains, catch-basins and underdrains ; but we 
have not the force to do the great amount really necessary to 
make any portion complete. With the large amount of avail- 
able stone, we can soon change this condition by the use of a 
stone crusher. We have electric power for this already in- 
stalled, and the fields from which the stone is taken will be 
cleared, and hence advanced in value. 

As to the needed stable, it is fair to say that we have never 
had a stable. Our stable horses have been in one of the 
old barns, which we very much desire and need to remove to 
another foundation, to be used for a store place for vegetables 
and groceries. This, if done, would leave us without even 
the present poor accommodations. I advise building a stable 
large enough for future needs, and one in which the portion 
where the horses stand will be non-combustible. I very much 
feel the need of so placing all live stock that it will be safe 
from fire. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



Training School for Nurses. 
The training school was established in 1899, and the first 
class was graduated in 1901. A decided improvement was 
noticed from the first in the care of patients. The nurses 
began to take more interest in their cases. The patients' diet, 
bowels and general hygienic surroundings were watched more 
carefully. As the nurses were taught the mental and moral 
characteristics of epileptics, quarrels and misunderstandings 
between patients and between patients and nurses became less 
and less frequent. 

The course has been strengthened from time to time by the 
addition of new subjects, and in 1902 the course for women 
was lengthened from two to three years. During the three 
years' training the nurses are taught not only to care for epi- 
leptic patients, but receive in addition instruction and prac- 
tical work in general medical and surgical nursing, which 
enables them to take up private nursing after their gradua- 
tion. The nurses Avho have gone out into private work have 
met with success in nearly every instance, and are a credit to 
the training school. Many of the nurses remain at the hos- 
pital after graduation and become head nurses, assistant super- 
visors and supervisors. 

A nurse enters the hospital on two months' probation. 
During this time she takes the preliminary course, which 
consists of ten lessons, on the following subjects : care of 
patients during convulsions ; hypodermic injections ; enemata ; 
rectal feeding ; pulse ; temperature ; respiration ; feeding the 
sick and helpless ; bed making ; hot packs ; baths ; ventila- 
tion ; bandaging, etc. 

The first year's work consists of instruction in anatomy and 
physiology, with recitations from Kimber's "Anatomy and 
Physiology for Nurses." 

The second year's work consists of a review of the previous 
year's work, and instruction in medical nursing, with recita- 
tions from Humphry's " Manual of Nursing." The nurse also 
receives practical instruction in uranalysis, massage, pharma- 
cology and dentistry. 

The third year's work consists of a review of Humphry's 
"Manual of Nursing," and instruction in obstetrics, bacteri- 



14 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



ology and surgery. Recitations are held from "Notes on 
Obstetrics " and Stoney's 4 ' Bacteriology and Surgical Technic 
for Nurses." The nurse also receives laboratory instruction 
in uranalysis and pharmacology. 

Recitations are held two days each week, from the 1st of 
October to the 1st of June. 

Medical and surgical lectures are given at frequent intervals 
during the winter months by members of the hospital staff and 
by the neighboring physicians. 

Graduate nurses and members of the third-year class are 
allowed to attend a limited number of private cases in the 
surrounding towns. In this way much valuable experience 
is gained. 

The male nurses are allowed a certificate of work at the end 
of two years ; some are willing to take the third-year work of 
the course, and graduate with a third-year diploma. 





List 


of Graduates. 




NAME. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Fannie C. Cronin, . 
Mary E. Kilduff, . 
Emma S. M. McKeever, . 


1901, 
1901, 
1901, 


Supervisor at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
Private nursing, . 

At State Farm, 


Palmer, Mass. 

Springfield, Mass., 

58 Spring Street. 
State Farm, Mass. 


Julia A. O'Brien, . 
Edith E. B. Townsend, . 


1901, 
1901, 


Private nursing, . 
Married, .... 


Roxbury, Mass., 22 
Kenilworth Street. 
Bragville, Me. 


Carroll W. Briggs, . 


1902, 


At Boston City Hospital, 


Boston, Mass. 


Annabelle M. D.Man warring, 


1902, 


Married, .... 


W^st Stephentown, 

West Stephentown, 

N. Y. 
State Farm, Mass. 


Edwin S. Manwarring, . 


1902, 




James L. McKeever, 


1902, 


At State Farm, 


Walter L. McKeever, 


1902, 




Middletown, Conn. 


Hattie Edith Rowe, . 


1902, 


Private nursing, . 


Georgetown, Me. 


Alice B. Smith, 
Marguerite J. Casey, 


1902, 
1903, 


Bookkeeping, 
Private nursing, . 


Medford, Mass., 27 
Xewburn Avenue. 
Burlington, Vt. 


Catherine Daley, 
Georgie A. Nute, 


1903, 
1903, 


Connecticut hospital for in- 
sane. 
At Stamford Hall, 


Middletown, Conn. 
Stamford, Conn. 


George J. Flint, 
Mae D. Brown, 
Annie A. Caldwell, . 
Louis A. Fontaine, . 
Frank L. Morway, . 
Auguste Tanski, 


1903, 
1905, 
1905, 
1905, 
1905, 
1905, 


Supervisor at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
Head nurse at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
Head nurse at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
Head nurse at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
Apothecary at Massachusetts 

Hospitarfor Epileptics. 
Head nurse at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 


Palmer, Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



Articles written. 

1. Four Lectures for Training School (titles elsewhere). 

2. Notes on Obstetrics for Nurses (three volumes). 

3. Receipts for Special Diets'. 

4. Revision of Rules for Nurses. 

5. Epilepsy as a Symptom. 

6. Epilepsy : General Observations and Home Care. 

7. Studies in Epilepsy (two papers). 

Autopsies and Findings. 

No. — Male. Autopsy, Oct. 20, 1904. White matter of brain 
showed numerous punctate hemorrhages, also one large hemorrhagic 
area was found on the floor of the fourth ventricle ; slight hyper- 
trophy of the heart ; fatty degeneration of both kidneys. 

No. 377. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 5, 1904. Dura very ad- 
herent ; large blood clot and disorganized tissue just below the floor 
of the right lateral ventricle ; lungs show old areas of scar tissue ; 
hour-glass stomach. 

No. 683. — Female. Autopsy, April 2, 1905. Dura adherent; 
numerous punctate hemorrhages in both gray and white matter ; heart, 
chronic endocarditis. 

No. 545. — Male. Autopsy, July 19, 1905. Only the brain ex- 
amined ; numerous punctate hemorrhages scattered throughout the 
gray and white matter. 

No. 530. — Female. Autopsy, Aug. 19, 1905. Brain not ex- 
amined ; hypertrophied heart ; dilated aorta ; calcareous degenera- 
tion of the mitral, aortic, semilunar valves ; scar tissue in the apices 
of both lungs ; chronic gastritis. 

Pathological Material collected. 
One brain ; apoplexy. 

Three brains ; numerous punctate hemorrhages. 
Three hearts. 

Operations. 

Inguinal hernia ; threatened strangulation ; results relieved. 
Post operative hernia ; results good. 
Three double ovariectomies ; results good. 
Appendectomy ; results good. 
Five tonsillotomies ; results good. 
A large number of minor operations. 



16 


HOSPITAL FOR 


EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 




Medical Lectures. 


DATE. 


Name. 


Subject. 


1905. 

March 21, 
April 5, 
April 29, 
May 4, 
May 27, 


Dr. Everett Flood, . 
Dr. A. 0. Morton, 
Dr. M. B. Hodskins, . 
Dr. R. A. Greene, 
Dr. A. C. Getchell, . 


Evolution. 

Aseptic Surgery. 

Kidney Diseases. 

Scarlet Fever and Measles. 

The Climate of the United States. 



Clergymen who have held Services here. 



Rev. Charles Olmstead. 
Rev. N. M. Pratt. 
Rev. Willis A. Moore. 
Rev. Dr. J. S. Lemon. 



Rev. M. Oakman Patton. 
Rev. C. N. Williams. 
Rev. Fr. Carey. 
Rev. Frederick F. Johnson. 



Table showing Patients employed, and in What Way. 



Industrial building, . 
Administration building, 
Employees' cottage, 
Nurses' home, 
Sewing rooms, 
Laboratory, . 
Dining rooms, 
Kitchens, 
Laundry, 
Stable, 
Ward work, 
Grading, 
Teaching, . 
Music practice for assemblies, 
With yard man, 
Painting, 
On roads, . 
Weaving, . 
Boiler house, 
Bakery, 
Clerical, 
Farm, . 
Greenhouse, 
Mason, 
Carpenter, . 
Store, . 
Farm group, 
Photography, 
Barns, . 

Totals, . 




1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 17 



Gifts. 


NAME. 


Residence. 


Gift. 


Business and Social Club, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. D. L. Bodfish, . 


Palmer, . 


Sunday-school quarterlies. 


Mrs. W. W. Converse, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Henry L. Holden, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Henriette dishing, . 
Mrs. W. S. Hyde, . 


Boston, . 
Ware, . 


Entertainment, clothing, sums of 

money and glasses for^patients. 
Bound volumes of magazines. 


Mr. W. E. Thayer, . 


South Hanson, 


Wild goose. 


Mrs. Regis Latinville, 


Westborough, 


Ribbon. 


Mr. Arland M. Rose, 


Springfield, . 


Toys. 


Mrs. Helen M. Whitman, 


Medford, 


Collars, handkerchiefs and aprons. 


Dr. Wra. N. Bullard, 


Boston, . 


Medical books. 


Miss Harriet Cushman, . 


Monson, 


Magazines. 


Mr. George Ezekiel, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. Samuel Rogers, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. L. E. Chandler, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. George Buck, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. Charles Fish, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. J. F. Holbrook, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. D. E. Marcy, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. Morrill, .... 


Palmer, . 


Books and magazines. 


Mr. A. E. Fitch, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. T. O. Esten, . 


West Brimfield, . 


Magazines and papers. 


Mr. L. A. Royce, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. J. C. Millen, . 


Thorndike, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. H. H. Paine, . 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Mary P. Townsley, . 


Springfield, . 


Books. 


Rev. Dr. J. S. Lemon, 


Gardner, 


Vases. 


Rev. Horace C. Hovey, . 


Xewburyport, 


Book. 


Rev. Fr. W. N. Hart, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


The Maltine Company, . 


Brooklyn, N. Y , . 


Xeoferrum. 


Mr. Frank Carpenter, 


Palmer, . 


Magazines. 


W. B. Saunders & Co., . 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


Text-book for nurses. 


Eastern Hampden Agricul- 
tural Society. 
Mr. W. P. Guy, 


Palmer, . 
Springfield, . 


Admission of patients to fair. 
Clothing. 



18 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Amusements. 

Dances, 48 ; masquerade, 1 ; readings and impersonations, 
7 ; musicale, 1 ; illustrated lectures, 2 ; sessions of dancing- 
school, 28 ; entertainment, legerdemain, 1 ; entertainment, 
crayon drawings, 1 ; entertainments, farces, 2 ; excursions to 
Forest Lake, 24; excursions to fair, 4; excursion to ball 
game, 1; car rides, 10; sleigh rides, 6; carriage rides, 18; 
whist party for employees, 1. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



i 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



19 







THE SEWIXG EOOM. 


Sheets made, 


638 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


256 


Pillow cases made, 


582 


Nightgowns made, 


18 


Rubber pillow covers made, 


14 


Oven cloths made, 


10 


Pillow ticks made, 


37 


Chemises made, . 


115 


Sofa pillows made, 


3 


Petticoats made, . 


19 


Chair cushions made, . 


4 


Aprons made, 


166 


Cosy corner cushion made, . 


1 


Mangle aprons made, . 


10 


Cosy corner cushion cover 




Barber's aprons made, . 


4 


made, ..... 


1 


Coats made, .... 


71 


Bed ticks made, . 


11 


Baseball suits made, 


21 


Table cloths made, 


152 


Holders made, 


6 


Napkins made, 


289 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


122 


Towels made, 


1,827 


Garters made, pairs, 


285 


Bureau covers made, . 


125 


Neckties made, 


19 


Bookcase cover made, . 


1 


Strainers made, . 


9 


Window shades made, . 


15 


Bathing caps made, 


11 


Sash curtains made, pairs, . 


44 


Denim socks made, pairs, . 


4 


Muslin curtains made, pairs, 


4 


Bibs made, .... 


102 


Denim curtains made, pairs, 


4 


Belt made, .... 


1 


Curtains for bookcases made, 


6 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


4 


Curtains for registers made, 


9 


Baseball flags made, . 


2 


Portieres made, pairs, . 


1 


Baby's cloak made, 


1 


Hot water bottle covers made, 


2 


Trousers shortened, pairs, . 


95 


Canvas wagon covers made, 


2 


Sleeves shortened, pairs, 


9 


Cover for barber's chair made, 


1 


Trousers lengthened, pairs, 


1 


Cover for camera made, 


1 


Sleeves lengthened, pairs, 


Q 

o 


Tea and coffee bags made, . 


42 


Blankets hemmed, 


6 


Floor swabs made, 


161 


Shirts cut, .... 


514 


Clothes bags made, 


44 


Nightshirts cut, . 


159 


Sawdust bags made, 


2 


Drawers cut, pairs, 


370 


Mail bag made, . 


1 


Chemises cut, 


124 


Rugs made, .... 


141 


Nightgowns cut, . 


92 


Screens covered, . 


13 


Petticoats cut, 


72 


Mattress covered, . 


1 


Bibs cut, .... 


149 


Camisole made, . 


1 


Baseball suits cut, 


21 


Shirts made, .... 


421 


Coats cut, .... 


30 


Undershirts made, 


193 


Trousers cut, pairs, 


3 


Nightshirts made, 


217 


Mitten linings cut, pairs, 


107 



20 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



ARTICLES MADE A2STD REPAIRED EN 
THE WARDS. 



Aprons made, 


268 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


11 


Corset covers made, 


97 


Mittens made, pairs, 


73 


d.YY CI 13 111 alio, [Jell I S, ■ 


. J. ID 


DlUo IlictUc, . i , 


1 

16 


Dresses made, 


245 


Curtains made, 


5 


Night dresses made, . 


277 


Screen covers made, 


6 


Dressing sacks made, . 


60 


Mattress covers made, . 


19 


Petticoats made, . 


80 


Bed ticks made, . 


2 


Bathing suit made, 


1 


Shirts made, . 


30 


Shirt waists made, 


12 


Bed socks made, pairs, 


4 


Skirts made,. 


8 


Blankets hemmed, 


10 


Surgical gown made, . 


1 


Sleeves made, pairs, . 


37 


Nurses' caps made, 


15 


Skirts shortened, . 


6 


Coats made, . 


63 


Stockings mended, pairs, 


. 1,835 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


25 


Pieces mended, 


899 


Vests made, . 


3 







1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



21 



AETICLBS MADE AXD EEPAIEED EST 
THE INDUSTRIAL ROOMS. 



Shoes made, pairs, 


256 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


55 


Slippers made, pairs, . 


177 


Mittens made, pairs, . 


85 


Rope rugs made, . 


32 


Nurses' ca£>s made, 


5 


Mattresses made, . 


45 


Curtain made, 


1 


Wooden head marks carved, 


4 


Mattress covers made, . 


226 


Wooden door plates carved, 


169 


Bed socks made, pairs, 


6 


Brooms made, 


203 


Suit made, .... 


1 


Milking stools made, . 


9 


Caps made, .... 


143 


Rustic benches made, . 


22 


Towels made, 


272 


Screens made, 


3 


Swab cloths made, 


105 


Checkers made, . . ' . 


144 


Bibs made, .... 


12 


Pill envelopes made, . 


8,000 


Dish towels made, 


24 


Window seat cushion made, 


1 


Shoes repaired, pairs, . 


776 


Clothes hangers made, 


160 


Shoes marked, pairs, . 


112 


Dominoes made, sets, . 


15 


Umbrellas repaired, 


129 


Pillows made, 


12 


Pillows renovated, 


351 


Sofa pillows filled, 


15 


Belts repaired, 


9 


Baseball bases made, , 


4 


Harnesses repaired, 


27 


Hammer handles made, 


38 


Chairs repaired, . 


16 


Hair picked, pounds, . 


750 


Screens repaired, . 


19 


Broom handles finished, 


295 


Suspenders repaired, pairs, . 


13 


Men's suits cut, . 


16 


Crutches repaired, 


2 


Men's coats cut, . 


102 


Chairs reseated, . 


23 


Vests cut, .... 


28 


Robes repaired, . 


2 


Overalls cut, pairs, 


113 


Rakes repaired, . 


12 


Trousers cut, pairs, 


154 


Stretcher repaired, 


1 


Aprons made, 


313 


Tub covers repaired, . 


3 


Corsets covers made, . 


11 


Chair cushions repaired, 


8 


Coats made, .... 


63 


Camp stool repaired, . 


1 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


70 


Broom machine repaired, . 


1 


Vests made, .... 


47 


Rugs repaired, 


3 



22 HOSPITAL 



FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Barber stool repaired, . 
Watch clock case repaired, , 
Step ladder repaired, . 
Bed ticks eyeletted, 
Truss repaired, . 
Baseballs repaired, 
Baseball protectors repaired, 
Mop repaired, 
Baseball glove repaired, 
Book repaired, 
Feedbaskets repaired, . 



1 


Mattresses repaired, . 


29 


1 


Baskets repaired, . 


3 


1 


Settee repaired, . 


1 


3 


Flower trellis repaired, 


1 


1 


Pieces mended, 


5,667 


3 


Envelopes printed, 


500 


2 


Postal cards printed, . 


400 


1 


Letter heads printed, boxes, 


10 


1 


Pamphlets printed, 


2,410 


1 

2 


Blanks printed, . 


86,430 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



23 



FAEM PRODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1904, to Oct. 1, 1905. 



Milk, 207,633 quarts $10,381 65 

Hay, 179 tons, 3,222 00 

Meadow hay, 32 tons 320 00 

Rowen hay, 8 tons 96 00 

Oat hay, 18 tons 216 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons, 900 00 

Green fodder, 129 tons, 387 00 

Rhubarb, 4,868 pounds, ' 97 36 

Lettuce, 4,050 heads, 81 00 

Green peas, 60£ bushels, 75 30 

Radishes, b\ bushels, 8 50 

Greens, 56 bushels, 28 00 

Sweet corn, 13,413 ears, 134 13 

Currants, 215 quarts, 21 50 

Beans, 110£ bushels, Ill 50 

Summer squash, 5,972 pounds, 119 44 

Winter squash, 9,520 pounds, 95 20 

Onions, 203 bushels, 203 00 

Carrots, 3261 bushels, 163 25 

Strawberries, 96 quarts, 11 99 

Blackberries, 14 quarts 1 40 

Ripe tomatoes, 113 bushels, 113 00 

Green tomatoes, 45 bushels, 22 50 

Cucumbers, 3,592, . . . 71 84 

Cucumbers for pickles, 6 bushels, 9 00 

Grapes, 250 pounds, 5 CO 

Potatoes, 2,005 bushels 1,415 00 

Beets, 370 bushels, 222 00 

Cabbage, 9 tons, 180 00 

Turnips, 334 bushels, 149 20 

Parsnips, 400 bushels, 240 00 

Horseradish, 2§ bushels, 2 64 

Field corn, 100 bushels, 75 00 

Beans for seed, 2 bushels, 4 00 

Pumpkins, 13 loads, 39 00 

Broom corn, 10 00 



Amount carried forward, §19,232 40 



24 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Amount brought forward, $19,232 40 

Pears, 7 bushels, 7 00 

Peaches, \ bushel, 50 

Lumber, 1,500 feet 22 50 

Wood, 125 cords, 312 50 

Crab apples, 20£ bushels, 20 50 

Apples, 4241 bushels, . . 212 25 

Cider apples, 125 bushels, 15 00 

Pork, 5,165i pounds, , 371 58 

Veal, 186 pounds, 18 60 

Lamb, 30 pounds, 4 50 

Chickens, 96 pounds, 14 40 

Unrendered lard, 40 pounds, 2 80 

Pigs sold, 35, 76 50 

Calves sold, 8, 19 50 

Wool sold, 352 pounds, 91 52 

Eggs, 368 dozen, 103 04 

Vegetables from greenhouse : — 

Cucumbers, 2,667 295 00 

Radishes, 2 bushels, 10 00 

Greens, 12 bushels, 6 00 

Lettuce, 375 heads, 7 50 

Spinach, 2 bushels, 2 40 

Cabbage, 1,000 pounds, 10 00 

Strawberries, 907 quarts, 113 37 

Beans, 12 bushels, 12 00 

Sweet corn, 1,044 ears, 10 44 

Green peas, 1\ bushels, 9 37 

Summer squash, 166 pounds, 8 30 

Ripe tomatoes, 6 bushels, 6 00 

Green tomatoes, 15 bushels, 7 50 

Cucumbers for pickles, 5 bushels, 7 50 

Winter squash, 300 pounds, 3 00 

Pumpkins, 13, . . . 1 30 

Cabbage plants sold, 200, 75 

Tomato plants, 128 dozen, 29 90 

Cut flowers, 75 00 



Total, 



121,140 42 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



25 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
* Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, . 
Assistant physicians (2), per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Treasurer, per year, . 
Clerk, per year, . 
Stenographer, per month, . 
Office assistant, per month, 
Steward, per year, 
Drug clerk, per month, 
Supervisor (woman), per month, 
Assistant supervisors (women, 2), per month, 
Supervisor (man), per month, 
Night nurses (women, 6), per month, 
Nurses (women, 22), per month, 
Night nurses (men, 6), per month, 
Nurses (men, 21), per month, . 
Engineer, per year, 
Assistant engineer, per month, . 
Helper, per month, . 
Firemen (5), per month, . 
Baker, per month, 
Kitchen man, per month, . 
Store assistants (2), per month, 
Cooks (5), per month, 
Assistant cooks (6), per month,. 
Table girls (5), per month, 
Foreman industrial room, per month. 
Seamstress, per month, 
Assistant seamstresses (5), per month, 
Laundress, per month, 
Laundryman, per month, . 



$3,000 00 
1,200 00 
600 00 
300 00 
600 00 
30 00 
20 00 
1,000 00 
30 00 
30 00 
24 00 
40 00 
$16 00-20 00 
16 00-24 00 
23 00-27 00 
23 00-30 00 
1,000 00 
50 00 
32 00 
$23 00-30 00 
46 00 
27 00 
$30 00-34 00 
22 00-30 00 
14 00-18 00 
14 00-18 00 
45 00 
30 00 
$5 00-18 00 
22 00 
30 00 



26 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



Assistant laundresses (7), per month, .... $14 00-$ 18 00 

Farmer, per year, 1,000 00 

Assistant farmers, (15), per month, $20 00-30 00 

Assistant farmer, without board, per month, .... 50 00 

Gardener, per month, 28 00 

Assistant gardener, per month, 25 00 

Driver, per month, 35 00 

Head carpenter, per day, 2 75 

Assistant carpenters (2), per day, 2 50 

Painter, per day, 2 00 

Mason, per month, 35 00 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



27 



GEXERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent; in this case the approval of a judge 
is required, in addition to the physicians' certificates and the 
notification of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to 
bed early. These restrictions are not irksome when they are 
hilly understood, and can be complied with easily. 

Patients' Clothixg. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Locatiox. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Kailroad, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London north- 
ern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in Palmer, 
the other in TTinchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, 
and the railroad fare is $1.90. 



28 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



TEEASUEER'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The report of the finances of this hospital for the year end- 
ing Sept. 30, 1905, is respectfully submitted herewith. 



Assets 



Real estate : 



Cultivated land, 113 acres, .... 


$ 17,311 


00 


W oodland, 21 acres, ...... 


1 ARK 
1,400 


on 


Pasturage, 104 acres, ..... 


A A Q"7 

4,4o7 


UO 


Farm (under appropriation 1901), viz. : — 






Cultivated land, 40 acres, .... 


1 flOA 

JL,OUU 


AO 


Woodland, 50 acres, ..... 


1,100 


00 


Pasturage, 30 acres, ..... 


OAA 

300 


A A 

00 


Farm (under appropriation 1903), viz, : — 






Cultivated land, 50 acres, .... 


1,150 


AA 

00 


\\ oodland, 190 acres, .... 


2,850 


00 


Pasturage, 60 acres, ..... 


• QAA 


AA 


Water and sewerage systems, .... 


38,413 


00 


Outside electric lighting (farm group), . 


800 


00 


Quarry, 


450 


00 


Buildings : — 






Original buildings, 


f39,620 


00 


Buildings (under appropriation 1895), . 


84,800 


00 


Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . 


86,600 


00 


Nurses' home ? , A . ,. ir ,Ao\ 
. . > (under appropriation 1902), 
Electric building S 


26,345 


00 


Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), 


5,050 


00 


Laundry (under appropriation 1901), 


9,500 


00 


Greenhouse, 


2,400 


00 


Farm group (under appropriation 1903), viz. : — 






Nos. 1 and 2, 


27,957 


52 


No. 3, 


6,248 


38 


Barns, 


2,827 


97 


Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), 


800 


00 




1,463 


19 


New building for men, 


8,160 


34 



$70,826 00 



301,772 40 



Amount carried forward. 



$372,598 40 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Amount brought forward, 
Personal estate : — 



29 

$372,598 40 



Live stock on farm, 


$10,063 


70 


Produce of the farm on hand, .... 


7,258 


36 


Carriages and agricultural implements, . 


4,255 


97 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 


44,936 


82 


Beds and bedding in inmates 1 department, 


12,131 


61 


Other furniture in inmates' department, . 


19,642 


89 


Personal property of State in administration 








6,762 


34 


Personal property of State in employees 1 cot- 






tage, 


1,611 


28 


Personal property of State in nurses 1 home, . 


3,737 


04 


Personal property of State in farm group No. 3, 


1,007 


28 


Personal property of State in greenhouse, 


751 


87 


Ready-made clothing, 


2,110 


61 


Dry goods, ....... 


3,954 


30 


Provisions and groceries, 


1,983 


04 


Drugs and medicines, ..... 


2,033 


61 


Instruments and laboratory fittings, 


2,598 


12 


Fuel, 


11,788 


50 




700 


00 


Other supplies undistributed, .... 


4,958 


39 



142,285 82 



Total, $514,884 22 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1904, .... 
Received from State on special appropriations 

Nurses 1 home, 1902, 

Repairs and alterations old buildings, 1903, 
New buildings, 1903, .... 
Water, sewerage and outside lighting, 1903, 
Repairs and improvements, 1904, 

New building, 1905, 

Furnishing new building, 1905, 
Total from appropriations, 

Received from State for maintenance, 
Received from towns for support of patients 
Received from individuals for support of pa 

tients, 

Received from soldiers 1 relief for support of 

patients, 

Received from reimbursements for support 

patients, 



$3,316 99 



of 



f23 80 
16 07 
1 45 
774 37 
5,219 68 
8,160 34 
233 66 



$113,135 20 

26,348 61 

6,205 61 

169 46 

989 91 



14,429 37 



Amounts carried forward, 



$146,848 79 



$17,746 36 



30 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Received from Board of Insanity and Board of 

Charity, for support of j)atients, . 
Received from interest on bank deposit, . 
Received from farm and farm produce, . 
Received from store, .... 
Received from barrels, junk and sundries, 
Received from advance money, State Treasurer, 



$ 146,848 79 §17,746 36 

79 25 

136 80 

208 85 

633 04 

402 62 

5,000 00 



153,309 35 



Total receipts, $171,055 71 



Expenditures. 



Salaries, wages and labor, 

Food : — 
Butter, .... 
Beans, .... 
Bread and crackers, . 
Cereals, rice, meal, etc., . 
Cheese, .... 
Eggs, .... 

Flour 

Fish, 

Dried and fresh fruit, 
Meats, .... 
Milk, . . . 
Molasses and syrup, . 
Sugar, .... 
Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, 
Vegetables, 

Sundries, .... 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 
Furnishing goods, .... 

Hats and caps, 

Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 
Brushes, brooms, etc., 
Carpets, rugs, etc., . 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 
Furniture and upholstery, 

Amounts carried forward, . 



$45,168 71 



$4,508 36 
77 13 

270 76 

780 09 
66 88 
1,908 55 
4,239 69 
1,132 53 

943 84 
6,497 55 

143 02 

473 18 
2,100 51 

367 23 
1,901 88 

719 37 

$255 84 
995 94 
1,801 44 
37 38 
44 25 
690 22 
1 08 

$2,405 09 
213 47 

1,145 02 
636 45 

1,290 17 



26,130 57 



3,826 15 



$5,690 20 $75,125 43 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



31 



Amounts brought forward, 



$5,690 20 $75,125 43 



Kitchen furnishings, . 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 

Sundries, 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, . 
Electricity, 



268 46 
249 16 
51 40 



Gas, . 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., .... 
Electrical work and supplies, . 

Hardware, 

Lumber, . . 

Machinery, etc., .... 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 
Roofing and materials, 
Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll), 
Sundries, 



Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc., . 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressage and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, 

Gratuities, 

Hose, etc., . . 
Labor (not on pay roll), . 
Medicines and hospital supplies, 

Postage, 

Printing and printing supplies, 
Return of runaways, 
Soap and laundry supplies, 
Stationery and office supplies, . 
School books and school sujDplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 

Tobacco, 

Water, 

Sundries, ..... 



$9,752 63 
428 61 
366 77 
296 25 
46 83 



$162 00 
331 90 
491 45 
71 88 
992 44 
721 42 
75 62 
1,733 47 
2,306 18 
7 16 
231 03 
189 17 



$396 62 
828 32 
1,152 05 
52 75 
6 20 
285 94 
46 50 
2,461 93 
236 40 
211 43 
15 00 
612 81 
325 46 
11 39 
463 93 
165 45 
514 91 
955 49 
584 81 



6,259 22 



10,891 09 



7,313 72 



9,327 39 



Amount carried forward, $108,916 85 



32 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct, 



Amount brought forward, $108,916 85 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Blacksmith and supplies, . . " . . . $344 06 

Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, . . 528 49 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 587 76 

Hay, grain, etc., 3,602 17 

Harness and repairs, 129 60 

Cows 160 30 

Other live stock, 15 00 

Labor (not on pay roll), 625 62 

Rent, 40 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 595 07 

Sundries, . . . .• • . . . . 145 31 

6,773 38 



Total expenses for maintenance, $115,690 23 

Other expenses on special appropriations, .... 14,429 37 

Paid State Treasurer, 38,092 42 

Expenses account of patients, 26 97 



Total expenditures, . . . • $168,238 99 

Cash on hand Sept. 30, 1905, 2,816 72 



$171,055 71 

Resources. 



Cash on hand, 


$2,816 


72 


Balance for maintenance with State Treasurer, 


29,940 


15 


Bills receivable for board, .... 


9,297 


78 


Other bills receivable, 


87 


64 


Unexpended special appropriations, 


72,347 


81 


Patients' funds on deposit, .... 


417 


01 


Nurses 1 training school fund, .... 


24 


27 


Expenses account of patients, . 


46 


55 


Liabilities. 






Salaries unpaid, ...... 


$3,851 


27 


Miscellaneous bills, 


2,563 


07 


Patients 1 funds, 


417 


01 


Nurses 1 training school fund, .... 


24 


27 



$114,977 93 



6,855 62 



$108,122 31 

Dividing the total expenditures for maintenance ($115,690.23) 
by the average number of patients (490.23) shows an an- 
nual cost per patient of $237 83 

Equivalent to an average weekly cost of 4 56 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 33 



Statement of Appropriations. 



| Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
this Year. 


Balance 
Available. 




$9,0,000 00 


$19,976 20 


$23 80 


- 


Repairs, furnishings, etc., 


4,000 00 


3,983 93 


16 07 


- 


New buildings and furnishings, 


30,000 00 


29,998 55 


1 45 


- 


Water, sewage and lighting, . 


6,000 00 


S 00 R fiQ 
0,--0 DO 


1 I i 6 I 




Repairs and improvements, . 


9,640 00 


8,678 51 


5,219 68 


$741 81 


New building, 1905 


75,000 00 




8,160 34 


66,839 66 


Furnishing new building, 


5,000 00 




233 66 


4,766 34 




8149,640 00 


862,862 82 


$14,429 37 


$72,347 81 



CHAS. B. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 

I have compared the treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1905, with the books kept at the institution, and find them to 
agree. Receipts for board, care, etc., to the amount of $38,092.42, have been turned 
in to the State Treasurer, for which his vouchers are on file. The cash account is 
correctly cast, and shows funds in the hands of the treasurer as follows: — 

Money belonging to patients, $417 01 

Nurses' training school fund, 24 27 

Balance 2,816 72 

$3,258 00 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, .... $1,753 88 

Cash vouchers not entered, 1,046 27 

Cash in safe at hospital, 457 85 

$3,258 00 



Oct. 17, 1905. 



GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Auditor of Accounts. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



i irs so e>» oj i otoioooot-fiio^'ii*^ 



N«!OHl8HO«MHMOSmt)03fl»<ONO!C»NOI'*81( 
CO C3 t- i-l CO SO CO i-i r-l r-l H(O!OXNW00l-Ht-it( 



I 00 CO CO irt I <M © ( 



1 CO i-l l-H l-l I 



I (M»oet-©eooot-coo>©vo-«# 

rHTjHiOSOeNOSOlOO^OOt-Ci 
<M r-i CM .... 

iO t- t— Ol 
i-l CO "5 i-l 



I r- CO © SO I I C>» SO I I CO CO < 



l (M r-l i-H CJ> OS SO 

CO CO CN CN 00 



> t- 00 CN b- SO SO I— O-JO 
<MCN00i-ltO»OTltf-->«^1«, 

t- O — i 



lt~i-le»IMlOiO'*C35. 



C23 



cn cq co 



SO CO CM 



. =2 . 

1 9 S to 
5 5 S 2 
f8j 



*S a 



o 

© a © ^ 



S3 . o © 

§ 2 go 
g & © ^ 2 .= a 

§"2 5 S § S § 
•a 



5SE2 

a a a 5 

o o 

1 i i «_ 



_ & - 

ic © « 
o OQ 
Sas 



cs "2 

© i* 



2 * 
11 
il 

^ "2 



2 2 
2 o 



go* aa* (3 



' 3 •« 



o £.2 



e> as 



© 2 © 

lis? 

ss > a • 
S a J .2 



.2.2 || § | 2.1 ©^ 



2*|S£S © 

g >T3T3T3 Stf© a « 
« © © 03 •• 

2 2 2^ 

3 3 3 si*" 



38 



2. 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 

— Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



[Oct. 



Cases admitted. 



NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


INSANE. 


SANE. 


TOTALS. 






















S 


to 

"3 




m 


s 

"3 


00 


00 


to 

"3 


go 




"3 


a 

<o 
fa 


3 

o 
H 


"5 
S 


a 
fa 


3 

O 
fr* 


"3 


a 

V 

fa 


3 

o 


First to this hospital, 


18 


12 


30 


38 


39 


77 


56 


51 


107 


Second to this hospital, . 


5 


3 


8 


9 


1 


10 


14 


4 


18 


Third to this hospital, 


3 




3 


3 


1 


4 


6 


1 


7 


Total cases, 


26 


15 


41 


50 


41 


91 


76 


56 


132 


Total persons, . 


26 


J5 


41 


46 


41 


87 


72 


56 


128 


First admitted to any hospital, 


11 


7 


18 


36 


36 


72 


47 


43 


90 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Totals. 


1 TOTALS. 


•siaqiojv 


CO l-H 00 l-MH^l^rtNHHHM 00 © 
rH i- CM rH CM tO OS 


•sjaqjBjj 


<M © CO >« t-iON^£OiHilHHHTf OiO © 
i-l i— 1 CM ri CM to OS 


•s^aijBj 


t- © rH (N M H | iOHHHHHO CO i-H © 

n« « <o t-i cm oj 


w 
H 

g 
H 
h 


■eaaqjoj^ 


1 I O ON 1 N« 1 NH 1 H« 


CO 


CO 


•eaaqje^ 




O CM | CO 
CO T 


•ejnaiiBj 


O i-H © >OiH 1 1 CO 1 i-H i-l 1 rH rH CO 1 
CM CO rH 




MALES . 1 


•sjaqioj^ 


3 O -f X OCHHtJNH 1 1 H | rt t^CI 




•8aaqjBj[ 


Hi CM I O d H C-l r- H 1 I rH 1 CM 


O CO t— 

CO 1 


•8JU9IIBJ 


CM I CO 1 1-1 


H 

<< 

DD 


1 TOTALS. 


•saaqjojf 


OOIN H lOCOHtt-HN 1 HHN t- •«*< CM 
I-H 1 CM l-H r-i 1 rr It- 


•saaqjBji 


00 00 l-H I t- ^ ift C W X H H 1 Hr-M § £J 


•sjaapBj 


00 00 (M 1 OO HNH I^JHH 1 HHH MH « 
CO It* i-H 1 CM 1 1- 


1 FEMALES. 1 


*8.l9q}0J^ 


TJ< kO 1 1 OS OS CM 1 CM 00 1 CM 1 1 rH rH uO CM 


CO 
CO 


•siaqiB^j 


"* r-l 


OS t- CO l-H CM CS 1 rH I IHH ION !D 
1 CM 1 CO 


•sjaaiiBj 


CM CO rH CO ISH 1 1 O 1 H 1 1 H 1 O 1 1 CO 
CM 1 CM H 1 CO 


MALES. 


•sjeqiOK 


CO CM 


CM CO rH rH CM OS rH | | H | H | CM CM 

rH I CM 


CO 

CO 


•sjaqjBjj 


1 loo I- CM i-i CM OS rH 1 1 rH | CM [ iC CO I CO 

I CM CO 

1 1 V I 


•BjaaijBj 


rH CM H 


CO 
CO 




| TOTALS. 


•sjaqjojii 


CO CM CM It- CM 1 1 1 t- 1 1 rH 1 1 i-h 


-H | 

l-H 


CO 


Insane. 


•sjaqjBjj 


Tf CM CM 1 00 CO 1 1 lirtl Irl 1 1 H 


O 1 00 




OS CM CM 1 CO •— t 1 1 1 l-l 1 1 f* 1 1 »H 


O i I 00 
l-H 


FEMALES. 


•saaqioj^ 






•sjaqjB^ 


rH rH | j CM 1 1 1 I M 1 |rH| 1 H 1 U5 1 It- 


•ejaapBj 


CO rH 1 1 1 1 H 1 IrHI 1 H I CO 1 I t- 


OQ 

hi 
< 


saaq;oj^ 


C0 rH CM 


CO CMIIICOIIIill lOl rH 


•eiaqjBj 


CO i-H CM CO MIIINIIMIllifllL 


•e;naijBj 


CO rH CM 1 OS l-Hl-HIIIIIIIII CMlji-H 




Other New England States 

Total native 

Other countries : — 

England, 

France, . 

Germany, 

Italy 

Newfoundland 



40 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





[N8AHK. 


Sank. 


Totals. 


COUNTIES. 






















s 


£ 






S 




3 


2 


so* 




"5 


1 


Tota 




§ 


Tota 


"3 
S 


i 


Tota 


Berkshire, . 








2 




2 


2 




2 


Bristol 


- 


- 


- 




3 


3 




3 


3 


Essex, ..... 








O 


A 


9 


o 




9 


Franklin, 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


Hampden, .... 


o 

lb 


Q 
O 


5 


a 




O 


11 


Q 

o 


Q 
O 


16 


Hampshire, .... 


3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


4 


1 


5 


Middlesex, .... 


1 


1 


2 


11 


6 


17 


12 


7 


19 


Norfolk 










3 


3 




3 


3 


Plymouth, .... 








1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


Suffolk, 


13 


3 


16 


13 


14 


27 


26 


17 


43 


Worcester, .... 


7 


5 


12 


6 


3 


9 


13 


8 


21 


Totals, .... 


26 


15 


41 


46 


41 


87 


72 


56 


128 


Cities or towns ( 10,0u0 or over) , 


14 


4 


18 


40 


28 


68 


54 


32 


86 


Country districts (under 10,000), 


12 


11 


23 


6 


13 


19 


18 


24 


42 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


Males. 


00 

o 

? 

5 
to 


00 

£ 

c 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


00 

© 

9 


oo 

aj 
as 
B 

9 


Totals. 


Unmarried, .... 


8 


4 


12 


23 


31 


54 


31 


35 


66 


Married, 


3 


2 


5 


12 


3 


15 


15 


5 


20 


Widowed, .... 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


4 






















Unknown, .... 




















Totals, .... 


11 


7 


18 


36 


36 


72 


47 


43 


90 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



41 



6. — Occupations of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



MALES. 





» 

c 

e3 


» 

c 


09 




e 

si 

09 


. 

c 


to 
•2 




C 


09 
CtJ 


o 
H 




c 


OS 
02 


o 


Barbers, 


— 


2 


2 


Section hand, . 


— 


1 


1 


Bookkeeper, 


- 


1 


1 


Shipper, . 


1 




1 


Carpenters, 


1 


4 


5 


. Stone cutter, . 




1 




Engineer, . 


1 




1 


Student, . 


1 




1 


J: dl Hit!! , • • • 




i 

X 


i 

X 


_1_ tJtXlJ-l&LCJ. y • ■ 




1 

JL 




Fisherman,. 




1 


1 


Timekeeper, . 




1 




Laborers, . 


2 


6 


8 


No occupation, 


4 


4 


8 


Machinist, . 
Mechanics, . 




1 

2 


1 
2 










Totals, 


11 


31 


42 


Operatives, 


1 


2 


3 


Unknown, 




5 


5 


Painter, 
Printer, 




1 


1 
1 












1 


Totals, 


11 


36 


47 


Restaurateur, 




1 


1 









FEMALES. 



Seamstress, 




1 


1 


No occupation, 


2 


14 


16 


Totals, 


7 


32 


39 


Unknown, 




4 


4 


Totals, 


7 


36 


43 



Domestics, . 


2 


6 


8 


Housekeeper, 


1 




1 


Housewives, 


1 


1 


2 


Operatives, 


1 


8 


9 


Photographer's assist- 








ant, .... 




1 


1 


Scholar, 




1 


1 



WIFE Oli DAUGHTER OF — 



Bartenders, 
Blacksmith, 
Building mover, 
Carpenters, 
Farmers, . 
Laborers, . 
Laundryman, 
Machinist, . 
Mechanic, . 
Minister, . 



1 


1 


2 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


5 


6 




3 
3 


3 




1 


3 
1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 



Operatives, 
Physician, 
Salesman, 
Saloon keeper, 
Sea captain, 
Shoemaker, 
Tailor, . 

Totals, 



28 



42 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Oct. 



Died. 


AT TIME OP DEATH. 


•sit^oj, 


1 ItJJN IH IHHH I 


CO 1 


13 
32.36 


•saiBoo.g; 


1 1 hc^h | | IH IH 1 


CO 1 


CO CO 

CO 

CO 




1 | CO i—l ^1 1 »—l 1 Ir-tl 1 


1 


t- t- 

■o 

CO 
CM 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 


•sibjoj, 


H 00 1 1 i-i t 1 l H H 1 1 


NH 


13 
16.89 




1 tO 1 1 1 1 1 1 l-H f 1 1 


« I 


CO H 




HM 1 1 »H 1 | | | r-l | | 


CO H 


t- co 

CO 

CO 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OP INSANITY. 


•bibjox 


, OrJirt^H I I HrlH 1 


00 I 


eo eo 
H t— 

(M 




1 HHHH 1 1 IH |H 1 


CO 1 


co co 
cc 




1 l-l CO IHH 1 | IHI 1 


t- 1 


t- us 

CN 


First admitted to Any Hospital. 


WHEN ADMITTED. | 


•sitnoj. 


1 H <N CM 11 CO 1 HH | 1 


CO , 


00 h 

eo 




1 l-l l-H 1 NHH 1 1-1 1 1 | 


t- , 


t— CO 

CM 

0> 
CM 


•B9I8K 


1 I HNNMN-I 1 H I 1 


H ' 


11 

32.27 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 




HCO*NH I | | — | 1 | 


t- H 


18 
15.14 




1 co co I h I i i i I i r 


t- 1 


o 




HiO-^ 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 1 


© H 


H Ifl 

■O 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF INSANITY. 


•BI8J0J, 


1— fH^^N |HH | | 


00 1 


18 

29.86 




1 H <M 1 CM H 1 IH| 1 | 


*- 1 


t- 00 

t- 

co 

CM 




1 1 N h m ^ | |HI 1 




11 

31.81 


7> 

H 
O 
*l 


Congeuital, 

1") y< a is and less, 
From 15 to 20 yearn, . 

20 to 25 years, . 

25 to 30 years, . 

30 to 35 years, . 

35 to 40 years, . 

40 to 50 years, . 

50 to 60 years, . 

60 to 70 years, . 

70 to 80 years, . 

80 to 90 years, . 

Totals, 

Unknown 

Total persons, 

Mean known ages, 



1905.] 



PUBLIC 



DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



I I i-H I i-H N 



O . 

< (H 

H GO 

Eh Ph 

GO PM 



HCOMH I I I H I I I I 



•O I rH I I I I I 



rHHN I I I I H I I 



<D I I to o 



on I n m 



Mt-IO^WHHH I 



I co 00 co eo eo i-h r-t I 



Eh go 

Eh h 

•4 W 

GO Ch 

E ft, 



o> eo cm 



NOON I (M I I IH I I 



CO Ol O rH -tf CN rH ! 



. g >>>>>>>it>.>,>j>>>»>» 
— '©lOOiOOO©©©© 

^rs o»cs»coco-<*»a«ot~ooo> 

»h ooooicoioooooo 
g i-HNN«»Tf intoi-oo 

g >,§ 



O O 



44 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



8. Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any 

Hospital. 















Predisposing 


Causes. 






Admitted. 






















HEREDITARY 


i NEUROTIC 


ALCOHOLIC 


EXCITING CAUSES. 








TENDENCY. 


TENDENCY. 


TENDEN 


CY. 




























Males. 


Females 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females 


Totals. 


Insane. 


























Physical : — 


























Childbirth, 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


1 














Overeating, 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 














Trauma, . 


1 


1 


2 


1 


- 


1 














Typhoid fever, . 


- 


1 


1 




















Mental : — 


























Worry and excite- 


























ment. 


- 


1 


1 




















Totals, . 


2 


5 


7 


2 




1 


3 



















Unknown, . 


9 


2 


11 


3 


1 


4 














Totals, . 


11 


7 


18 


- 

5 




2 


7 




















Sane. 


























Physical : — 


























Alcoholism, 


2 




2 














2 


- 


2 


Apoplexy, 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 














Cold bath, 




1 


1 




















Losing arm, 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 














Malaria, . 


1 




1 


- 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Overeating, 




2 


2 




1 


1 














Overwork, 




1 


1 




















Senility, . 


1 




1 


- 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Strain, 


2 




2 




















Teething, . 
Trauma, • 




2 


2 




















3 


3 


6 




















Tumor of the brain, . 




1 


1 




















Worms, 




1 


1 




















Mental : — 


























Fright, 


1 


3 


4 




















Grief, 


1 




1 




















Overstudy, 


1 




1 




















Totals, . 


14 


15 


29 


2 


2 


4 










2 




2 


Unknown, . 


22 


21 


43 


2 


4 


6 








1 




1 


Totals, . 


36 


36 


72 


4 


6 


10 








3 




3 


Aggregates, . 


16 


20 


36 


4 


3 


7 








2 




2 


Unknown, . 


31 


23 


54 


5 


5 


10 








1 




1 


Aggregates, . 


47 


43 


90 


9 


8 


17 






- | 


3 




3 



1905.] 



PUBLIC 


DOCUMENT — No. 62. 












1 1 1 


1 1 


, /-vi rf\ r*"> is— 

\AJ \AJ 


CO ~v 


O 


rH 






00 

3 








CO 




"^f 


















Cn 


















1—1 


■ 


■ 


s 


1 1 1 




tfi t°^\ *"vci ffs rf** 




CO 


CO 




Ph 








rH rH 








TOTi 


Ed 
a 


a 

fa 












CM 
rH 






05 


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HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



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1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 47 



11. — Causes of Death. 







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48 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Oct. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 62. 



REPuRT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

POST-OFFICE A>D BATT.BOAP STATION". PALMER , 

fok ran 

Fourteen Months endesg November 30, 1906. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & FOTTER PRINTING lV . -TATE PRINTERS. 
13 Post Office Square. 
1907. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 62. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS. Wurvy»«M 

Hospital for Epileptics 

a 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 



FOR THE 



Fourteen Months ending November 30, 1906. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE [PRINTERS, 
[18 Post Office Square. 
1907. 




Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



Hot 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers. 5 

Trustees' Report, 7 

Superintendent's Report, 12 

General Information 23 

Articles made in the Sewing Room 24 

Articles made and repaired in the Wards, 26 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Room 27 

Farm Products, 29 

List of Persons regularly employed, 31 

Treasurer's Report, 33 

Statistical Tables, . . . . 41 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, 
CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary, 
MABEL W. STEDMAN, 
HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., . 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D., 
WINFORD N. CALDWELL, . 
MARY P. TOWNSLEY, . 



Boston. 

Groton. 

Brookline. 

Lenox. 

Dalton. 

Springfield. 

Springfield. 



RESIDENT 
EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., 
MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D., . 
EDWARD A. KENNEDY, M.D., . 
ALDEN V. COOPER, M.D., . 
MARY W. WENT WORTH, . 
CHARLES F. SIMONDS, 
GEORGE E. BATES, 
GEORGE H. GALLUP, . 



OFFICERS. 

. Superintendent. 

. Assistant Physician. 

. Assistant Physician. 

. Assistant Physician. 

. Stenographer. 

. Steward and Storekeeper . 

. Engineer. 

. Farmer. 



WALTER C. LANG Clerk and Treasurer. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
DR. E. G. BRACKETT Consulting Orthopedic Surgeon. 



Cnmmonhttaltfc of |ttassacbusctts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and Honorable Council 

The following report of the trustees of the Massachusetts 
Hospital for Epileptics at Monson, for the period extending 
from Sept. 30, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906, is respectfully sub- 
mitted. (See Acts of 1905, chapter 211.) 

The membership of the Board of Trustees for this period 
has remained unchanged, the Governor having reappointed 
Dr. W. W. Scofield of Dalton on the expiration of his pre- 
vious term of service, and his appointment having been duly 
confirmed by the Council. 

In November, 1905. Dr. Arthur O. Morton, assistant physi- 
cian, resigned in order to engage in private practice. His 
retirement was a real loss to the hospital, as he had been con- 
nected with it for seven years, had grown up with the institu- 
tion, and had shown himself peculiarly fitted in mind and 
character for the duties required in his position. It was with 
great regret that the trustees accepted his resignation. 

In February, 1906, Dr. Alden V. Cooper and Dr. Charles 
A. Davis were appointed assistant physicians. In September, 
1906, Dr. Davis resigned to go into private practice. 

By vote of the Board. Nov. 8, 1906, Dr. E. G. Brackett 
was appointed consulting orthopedic surgeon. 

The treasurer, Mr. Charles B. Fiske of Palmer, has resigned 
on account of ill health, his resignation to take effect on the 
appointment of his successor. In November Mr. Walter C. 
Lang was appointed to the position of clerk and treasurer. 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



The number of patients in the hospital on Sept. 30, 1905, 
was 268 males, 253 females, total 521 ; the number on Sept. 
30, 1906, was 283 males, 248 females, total 531 ; the number 
on Nov. 30, 1906, was 292 males, 251 females, total 543. 

On account of the overcrowding, 25 women were transferred 
in February, by the State Board of Insanity, to the Worcester 
Insane Asylum. The overcrowding on the men's side can now 
be relieved by the occupation of the new building for men, 
which has room for 100. 

The special appropriations granted by the Legislature dur- 
ing this year have been : building for 100 women, including 
furnishing, $80,000; stone crusher, $2,000. 

This building is essentially similar to the one just built for 
the men, and is intended especially for those patients who are 
most troublesome and most in need of care and restraint. 

The stone crusher has been arranged for and will be ready 
for use in the spring. 

The appropriation for current expenses in 1906 was $128,- 
783.89, based on an estimate of an average number of patients, 
580, at $4.50 per head, and the deficiency appropriation of 
$3,448.89. 

In common with the other State hospitals, the eight-hour 
law passed by the Legislature has affected us more or less 
seriously. The superintendent reports that it has added at 
least $100 per month directly to the salaries and wages, as 
well as adding indirectly to the cost of food and maintenance 
of employees, so that not less than $1,500 will thus be added to 
our annual expenses. As no consideration of this was appar- 
ently made by the Legislature when the bill was passed, and as 
no provision was made to meet such extra expense, it would 
seem proper to draw the attention of the authorities to this 
occurrence. Either a sufficient sum for extra and contingent 
expenses should be appropriated in the current expense account 
each year, or, whenever a law is passed necessitating increased 
expense, provision for the payment of such expense should be 
made. Unless one of these things is done, no accurate estimate 
can be returned. 

The special appropriations to be asked for this year are as 
follows : 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



Removing old buildings and laying new foundations for them, . $8,500 

Constructing silos,- . , . . .... 1,100 

Alterations in old buildings, purchase and erection of feed water 

heater and bakery machinery, and minor improvements, . . 3,400 

Horse stable, 6,000 

$19,000 

We do not desire to push forward too rapidly, nor do w r e 
deem it wise or businesslike to ask for anything whatever, un- 
less after due consideration it is apparent that it is really needed 
for the welfare and progress of the institution, or that it will 
be a measure of economy. It is, however, often advisable to 
spend a larger sum at one time in order to perfect or install a 
plant which w r ill bring about an annual saving for many years 
rather than to pay a smaller sum frequently. 

In their report for 1905 the State Board of Insanity has 
advised the reduction of the age limit for patients in this in- 
stitution. The Board of Trustees strongly favor it, and are 
unanimously of the opinion that it is a wise and beneficial 
measure. 

During the past year the new building, to contain room for 
100 male patients of the more excited and disturbed classes, 
has been completed and furnished. Patients are being placed 
therein gradually, and we expect that it will shortly be filled. 

The new building for women, for which the appropriation 
was granted this year, has been begun and the walls are par- 
tially built. 

These two buildings promise to be of great importance to the 
institution, not only in permitting us to care for a larger num- 
ber of patients, but in simplifying our classification and in 
removing many obstacles in the w r ay of an easy administration. 
The difficulties of management when different classes have to 
be treated together and the same rules made to apply to all are 
very great. The elimination of the more troublesome and 
dangerous is of the greatest benefit, both to themselves and to 
others who can safely be afforded greater privileges. 

Many small repairs and improvements in the building and 
plant have been made this year. Such are always required in 
any progressive institution in order to enable it to keep in 
proper condition and up to date. Among these we may men- 



10 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



tion the replacing of the wooden steam pipe conduits with tile 
and the thorough insulation or covering of the pipes so as to 
prevent any avoidable loss of heat, extensive repairs in the coal 
shed, better construction of catch basins, and the covering of 
the lockers with iron to make them fireproof. Especially we 
would state here that we have made very cheaply certain 
" balcony rooms," or enclosed spaces, on the balconies of M 
and O cottages, for the purpose of isolating the tuberculous 
patients and of enabling them to sleep out of doors if required. 
These arrangements are now sufficient for the proper care and 
isolation of the tuberculous, and at present a separate building 
for them is not needed. 

During the past fourteen months there have been 42 deaths 
among the patients and only 17 autopsies. It is extremely 
important that as large a number of autopsies as possible should 
be obtained in order to increase our knowledge of the exact 
conditions occurring in this affection and to enable us to act 
more efficiently for its relief and cure. Our knowledge cannot 
be adequately advanced unless we can have the opportunities 
for proper examination and investigation. These examinations 
and investigations are not at all, as sometimes seems to be 
thought, for the benefit of the doctors or even for the institu- 
tion. They are for the benefit of the public, of the citizens 
of the State as a whole, and more especially for those living 
under the affliction of this terrible disease. It is in their name 
and for their sakes that we demand and shall demand persist- 
ently and perseveringly the means to aid them, and attempt to 
combat, so far as we may, the ignorance and selfishness and 
stupidity which refuses to help one's neighbor at some sacrifice 
of personal feeling and prejudice. 

We believe that such opposition to autopsies as exists is 
largely due to ignorance, rather than to uncharitableness, and 
we desire to spread knowledge on this subject among all those 
who dwell in this Commonwealth. It should not be forgot- 
ten, as regards the foreigners, that many of them come from 
countries where autopsies are required by law on any person 
dying in a public hospital, and that therefore such conditions 
are to them neither new nor unusual. 

Daring the past year the Board has requested full reports 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



in writing from the superintendent in regard to certain sub- 
jects : — 

1. The condition of the conducting steam pipes, and as to 
whether any (1) avoidable or (2) unavoidable loss of heat 
existed in them, and if so to what extent. 

2. A full statement of the causes and conditions of the per- 
centage rate of salaries, wages and labor, food, etc., in this 
hospital during the year ending Sept. 30, 1905. 

We believe that it is advisable that full reports of this char- 
acter should be made each year by the superintendent to the 
trustees on such subjects as the trustees may deem advisable, 
and that thorough and systematic investigation into the admin- 
istrative problems can thus be accomplished with great benefit 
to the hospital. 

WILLIAM N. BULLAED, 

For the Trustees. 



12 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The following report is respectfully submitted. 

The work of this hospital is unique in this State, and the 
one essential principle which must always indicate success or 
failure with patients as intelligent as the majority of ours 
should be whether or not we can, at proper cost, help them 
and their families and satisfy them to a reasonable degree. 

All the usual difficulties and some new ones, such as the 
great scarcity, at seasons, of efficient helpers, have been 
experienced. 

The routine daily work has become so established that no 
special mention need be made of it. It is well understood, 
and goes on from day to day with such variations as each 
season requires, with new duties felt and met as new condi- 
tions arise. I have detailed only a few of the circumstances 
as they seem to require notice. 

The special appropriations for the year 1906 were, first, 
$80,000 for a furnished building for 100 women. The build- 
ing is now well under way and will be practically a duplicate 
of the men's building, recently completed and now occupied. 
This furnishes single rooms for a large percentage of its occu- 
pants and helps in our classification to a large degree. The 
second item is $2,000 for a stone crusher and power. 

Owing to the crowded conditions already existing, the new 
building will furnish room for about 60 additional patients, 
so that our attendance for the next year will not exceed an 
average of 600. 

The appropriation which was so much needed for the removal 
and alteration of the barns was not passed last year. The need 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



and economy of the changes proposed will commend themselves 
to those who become fully familiar with the conditions. The 
result of this desired removal would be immediately helpful. 
Our work can then be carried on with one less hired man ; the 
amount of time consumed in going to and from work will be 
much lessened ; the care of the head farmer can be more directly 
applied at all times to all the stock. In cases of sickness 
prompt attention from him is of great importance, the life of 
an animal often depending upon quick and intelligent aid. I 
earnestly recommend a renewal of your request for an appro- 
priation to bring about this removal. 

Valuable work and instruction in dentistry were carried on 
by Dr. Cornelius H. Mack of Springfield during the entire 
summer. Our training class has derived much benefit from 
this teaching. 

By the courtesy of the Board of Trustees of Dan vers Hospital 
Dr. Hodskins had the privilege of spending four weeks in their 
pathological laboratory and wards under the instruction of Dr. 
E. E. Southard. Our thanks are due these officials, as well 
as to the superintendent, Dr. C. A. Page, for the valuable 
opportunities. 

Dr. Hodskins' duties have been so modified that he has done 
more and more of the medical work and is now somewhat in 
the capacity of a medical director. He sees all the new cases 
and directs their treatment, attends in consultation with an- 
other assistant in all serious sickness, supervises the records 
and performs the autopsies. We -attempt to thus provide for 
the thorough examination of all new cases and keep up a 
continuous care of all cases. 

We have now boxes and cards for recording all disorders, 
and hope soon to have available complete and handy reference 
to any of these conditions. This will be worked up from the 
records in the cases of all previous admissions, and easily kept 
up to date in cases of all new patients. 

The annual nurses' night has become a feature of our train- 
ing school work. The guests from Monson and Palmer are 
kind critics and have manifested a very helpful interest in our 
work. Their presence and continued encouragement are much 
appreciated. The program for the last graduation is given 



14 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



below, as an item of interest to your Board for permanent ref- 
erence : — 

Vocal selection and several piano selections. 
Hot pack. 

Administration of hypodermics. 

Massage. 

Essay. 

Gastric lavage. 
Bandaging. 

Preparation of special diet. 
Cold sheet bath. 
Changing sheets. 
Artificial respiration. 
Bed making. 

Address to class. Lantern slides. 
Refreshments. 

The practice of sending nurses to assist in families has been 
continued and amounts to a system of district nursing. The 
doctors in the several villages of Palmer and Monson, as well 
as occasionally in Brimfield or Wales, request the attendance 
of a nurse from the hospital, and when possible we are always 
glad to comply, not only for the reason that this is a great help 
to the families but also because the nurse gets valuable ex- 
perience. 

The instruction given to our blind patients, three in number, 
has been continued during the year. This comes through the 
good offices of the Perkins Institute for the Blind and is a much 
appreciated favor. 

A summary of the orthopedic work done by Dr. E. G. 
Brackett of Boston, whom you have appointed as consulting 
orthopedic surgeon, is given elsewhere. 

Among our class of cases there are so many deformities, 
usually untreated, that their sj^stematic correction is a distinct 
advance in a hospital of this kind. 

By the will of Mrs. Ellen Humphreys, a patient here for 
several years, the hospital became a residuary legatee resulting 
in the small sum of $48. This amount has been designated by 
your Board for shrubs and lawn decorations. The amount, 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



though small, is significant of a common impulse among the 
more appreciative patients to do something as a return for the 
benefits bestowed upon them. 

On Jan. 22, 1906, Nathaniel Young obtained arsenic at the 
drug store in town, and during the day following he took sufii- 
cient of this to cause his death nineteen hours later. This 
patient was a sane admission. Even the sane cases are not 
allowed to go to town unattended. The rule is sometimes 
disregarded by paroled patients. When this is known the 
parole privilege is withdrawn. Epileptics as a rule are not 
despondent. Sometimes in a fit of passion a patient threatens 
to kill himself, though as yet no such threat has been carried 
out. 

The possibilities for our children's >chool broaden year by 
year. The work done the last year was extremely creditable. 
The exercises on the closing day were by far the best we have 
ever had. AVith the improved conditions in our one school- 
room, though the room is still far from what we need, much 
good work can be done. The field has its discouraging ele- 
ments. These have diminished rather than increased as we go 
on from year to year. In time our results will be satisfactory 
under the conditions to be met. I believe that the manual 
training by actual work in the shops or fields is already very 
fully accomplished for our present residents. This will need 
change and enlargement, probably new ground and new equip- 
ment, if the character or number of patients should change 
materially. 

The work of our choir, in which, as a rule, one patient plays 
a cornet and another the piano, while of the fifteen persons 
who sing, often thirteen are patients, has been rather a note- 
worthy feature. Under the guidance of Miss Wentworth good 
results are attained. We have good music and those who par- 
ticipate are interested and instructed. 

Among the extra medical work during the vear should be 
noted the excellent work of Dr. Hodskins and Dr. G. A. 
Moore of Palmer on Eye Strain in Epilepsy." The paper 
giving the investigation and results was read at the annual 
meeting of the Xew England Psychological Society, held in 
September at this hospital, and again in a revised form at the 



16 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEFTICS. [Dec. 



annual meeting of the National Association for the Study of 
Epilepsy and the Care and Treatment of Epileptics, and will 
be published in the transactions of that association. 

The principle of having our somewhat isolated groups, 
e.g., Farm group with 80 men, Farm cottage with 19 men and 
the Green house with 10 men, has become sufficiently estab- 
lished to warrant a favorable opinion. These men have work 
and amusement separate so far as possible from the others, and 
acquire an interest in their own places which is often like their 
interest in their homes. With our nearer group of 100 men in 
the new men's north, a similar group of 100 women in the 
women's south, the group of 25 at Hyde cottage and the other 
divisions now in actual use, our classification has gained im- 
mensely in method. We are now in a position to arrange grades 
of the same kind in a much more satisfactory manner than ever 
before. While much is still lacking, the outlook is more en- 
couraging as our plans become more materialized. 

A summary of the principal lines of improvement is given as 
a memorandum. Only those items are noted which have added 
to the permanent value of the plant. The regular repairs have, 
of course, been kept up, to prevent deterioration, but these are 
not mentioned in detail. The reason for the improvements has 
been a clearly defined necessity in each case. 

List of the Principal Improvements carried on during 
the Last Few Years. 
Chair rail round many wards. 
Moulding round many wards. 
Catch- basins all over the roadways and grounds. 
Water-closets in many basements. 
Slop sinks in many basements. 
Cement floors in many basements. 
Sinks in basements. 

Iron or plaster ceilings in several basement rooms. 

Finish of basement rooms. 

Painting of walls of rooms and wards. 

Hose and fire extinguishers. 

Awnings. 

Water pipe where cement pipe was broken and a surplus for fur- 
ther use 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



Drain tile for surface drains. 
Repairing two dams and clearing out two ponds. 
Renewing floors in barn twice. 
Gutters and conductors on several roofs. 
Screens for doors and windows. 
Setting out thousands of trees. 
Replastering Hyde cottage and painting it. 
Renewing decayed floors and partitions in Hyde cottage. 
Renewing decayed floors and partitions in employees' cottage- 
Renewing decayed floors and partitions in cow barn. 
Building six hen houses from lumber of old sheds. 
Repairing damage done to land by high water in brook. 
Construction of trestle. 

Considerable labor of carpenters on new laundry. 
Running lines for telephone and light to Green house and Farm 
cottage. 

Grills for machines. 
Renewal of telephone. 
New culverts. 

Iron fire-escapes. Wire ladder fire-escapes. 
Hundreds of fly screens. 

Renewing often the floors of the uncovered piazzas. 
Fireproofing round elevators in attics. Fireproofing lockers and 
ceilings. 

Considerable work in final adaptation of rooms for dormitory pur- 
poses at Farm cottage and Green house. 

Articles written. 

1. Four lectures for training school (titles elsewhere). 

2. The Relation of Eye Strain to Epilepsy. 

3. Heredity in Epilepsy. 

4. A Hospital Composite. 

5. Spinal Cord Lesions in Epilepsy. 

6. Heart Lesions in Epileptics. 

7. What has been gained for the Epileptics? 

8. Organic Epilepsy. 

9. Address on Epilepsy to the students of Colby College. 

Autopsies and Findings. 
No. 893. — Male. Autopsy, Nov. 24, 1905. Chronic leptomen- 
ingitis of vertex ; carcinoma of liver and ascites. 

No. 437. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 25, 1905. Kidneys cystic; 



18 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



acute splenitis ; uterine polyp ; old fracture of right tibia and cystic 
degeneration of right ovary. 

No. 620. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 14, 1905. Pulmonary tuber- 
culosis of the lungs, with necrosis and cavitation ; cyst of right ovary. 

No. 1024. — Female. Autopsy, Jan. 12, 1906. Arteriosclerosis 
of cerebral vessels ; hypertrophy of heart ; chronic gastritis ; general 
arteriosclerosis ; interstitial nephritis. 

No. 77. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 25, 1905. Hypertrophy and 
fatty degeneration of the heart ; dilatation of aorta ; kidneys fatty ; 
gall bladder dilated. The interior showed chronic cholecystitis and 
numerous gall stones. Peritoneal adhesions and Cystic degeneration 
of ovaries. 

No. 306. — Female. Autopsy, Jan. 11, 1906. Autopsy limited 
to examination of cranial cavity. Arteriosclerosis of the cerebral 
vessels ; endothelioma of dura. 

No. 399. —Female. Autopsy, Feb. 7, 1906. Autopsy limited 
to the abdominal and thoracic cavities. Chronic cholecystitis and 
cystic degeneration of right ovary. 

No. 1133. — Male. Autopsy, March 1, 1906. Hypostatic con- 
gestion of the lungs ; acute internal hydrocephalus and cerebral 
cyst. 

No. 277. — Male. Autopsy, March 22, 1906. Autopsy limited 
to examination of cranial cavity. Chronic lepto-meningitis of vertex. 

No. 874. —Male. Autopsy, March 25, 1906. Gall bladder 
dilated. The interior showed chronic cholecystitis and contained 
fifty-five small gall stones ; chronic gastritis ; spleen fibrous ; inter- 
stitial nephritis ; heart hypertrophied ; chronic endocarditis ; general 
arteriosclerosis and chronic lepto-meningitis of the vertex. 

No. 280. — Male. Autopsy, April 5, 1906. Hypostatic conges- 
tion of lungs. 

No. 314. — Female. Autopsy, June 4, 1906. Moist gangrene of 
right foot ; fatty heart ; general arteriosclerosis ; stenosis of aortic 
orifice ; interstitial nephritis ; old lepto-meningitis of vertex ; small 
cyst of left choroid plexus ; acute splenitis ; cirrhotic liver ; decu- 
bitus ; old fracture of neck of right femur with impaction, and 
anchylosis of joint and pleuritic adhesions. 

No. 107. — Male. Autopsy, Aug. 27, 1906. Stomach contents 
in bronchial tubes ; chronic gastritis ; chronic cholecystitis ; chronic 
splenitis ; chronic external pachy-meningitis and chronic lepto-men- 
ingitis of vertex. 

No. 96. — Male. Autopsy, Sept. 3, 1906. Dilatation of heart; 
chronic endocarditis ; arteriosclerosis of coronary arteries ; general 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



19 



arteriosclerosis ; cystic kidneys ; pulmonary edema ; chronic gastritis ; 
chronic lepto-meningitis of vertex ; cyst of left choroid plexus and 
chronic splenitis. 

No. 229. — Male. Autopsy, Oct. 14, 1906. Chronic lepto-men- 
ingitis of vertex and cystic left kidney. 

No. 1194.— Female. Autopsy, Oct. 15, 1906. Chronic endo- 
carditis ; edema and hypostatic congestion of lungs ; cirrhosis of 
liver ; chrouic nephritis ; fibroids of uterus and fatty degeneration of 
ovaries ; acute splenitis ; ascites and general anasarca and lepto-men- 
ingitis of cortex. 

No. 464. — Female. Autopsy, Oct. 23, 1906. Hypostatic con- 
gestion of the lungs ; acute miliary tuberculosis ; porencephalies ; 
cerebral hemiatrophy ; acute splenitis and chronic lepto-meningitis. 

Opekations. 

Two double ovariectomies. 

One curetage. 

One ventral suspension. 

One herniotomy. 

One incision of varicocele. 

Five circumcisions. 

One osteotomy. 

One tendon transplantation. 

One osteotomy and tenotomy. 

One tenotomy. 

One plastic operation on scalp. 



Medical Lectures. 



Date. 


Name. 


Subject. 


1906. 

March 9, 


Dr. Morgan B. Hodskins, . 


Diseases of the Respiratory Or- 
gans. 
Typhoid Fever. 
Emergencies. 
Modes of Infection. 
Diphtheria. 
Erysipelas. 
Pneumonia. 

Hygiene of the Respiratory Tract. 
Causes of Disease. 
Presentation of diplomas by Dr. 
Flood. 


March 16, 
March 26, 
April 2, 
April 10, 
April 16, 
April 24, 
May 5, 
May 12, 
June 20, 


Dr. Frederick S. Ward, . 
Dr. Theodore S. Bacon, . 
Dr. Herbert C. Emerson, . 
Dr. Edward A. Kennedy, . 
Dr. Charles A. Davis, 
Dr. Alden V. Cooper, 
Dr. A. C. Getchell, . 
Dr. J. I. Butler, 
Graduating exercises, 



20 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



Clergymen who have held Services here. 



Rev. Charles Olmstead. 
Rev. N. M. Pratt. 
Rev. Willis A. Moore. 
Rev. Dr. J. S. Lemon. 
Rev. C. J. Sniffen. 
Rev. Franklin S. Hatch. 



Rev. C. W. Williams. 
Rev. Fr. Carey. 
Rev. Fr. Lane. 
Rev. Charles E. Hill. 
Rev. L. L. Greene. 
Rev. F. S. Brewer. 



Table showing Patients employed, and in What Way. 




Industrial building, . 
Administration building, . 
Employees' cottage, . 
Nurses 1 home, 
Sewing rooms, . 
Dining rooms, . 
Kitchen, .... 
Laundry, .... 
Ward work, 

Teaching, .... 
Music practice, . 
Farm group, 

Barn, 

Carpenter, .... 
Farm, . . . - . 
Greenhouse, 

Mason, .... 
Mending, .... 
Painter, .... 

Printer 

On roads, .... 
With yard man, . 
With engineer, . 

Store, 

Lawn, 

Bakery, .... 
Music practice for assemblies, 



Gifts. 


NAME. 


Residence. 


Gift. 


Mr. Edward E. Lynch, . 


Woburn, . 


Clothing. 


Mrs. Mary P. Townsley, . 


Springfield, 


Book. 


Mr. William E.JFlynt, . 


Palmer, 


Magazines. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



21 



Gifts — Concluded. 



NAME. 


Residence. 


Gift. 


Miss Harriet Cushman, . 


Monson, . , 


Papers. 


]Vrr. Clarence E. Brown . . 


Boston . . . 


Clothing. 


L lit X Ul UUt 1 HVlllU li V_/ Will 


New York 


Glycerine tonic compound. 


pany. 

Mrs. Margaret Riordan, • • 


Walpole, 


Clothing. 


Rev. William H. Hart 


Palmer, . . . 


Magazines, etc. 


Mr. D. E. Marcy, 


Palmer, 


Books and magazines. 


Dr. M. B. Hodskins, . . 


Palmer . . 


Book. 


Mrs. Helen M. Whitman 


Med ford . . . 


A gift. 


Mrs. D. L. Bodfisli 


Palmer . . . 


Books and magazines. 


Palmer " Journal " office, 


Palmer, 


Waste paper. 


Miss Jessie R. Catlin, 


Palmer, . . 


Two pictures. 


Mr. Arthur E. Fitch, 


Palmer, 


Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. Anna F. Fuller, 


Palmer, 


Pieces for patchwork. 


Parke Davis & Co. 


New York, . 


Acetozone 2 ounces. 


Mrs. C. Carpenter, 


Monson, . 


Magazines and papers. 


Simpson Bros., .... 


Boston, 


Bitumen. 


Mrs. Emma C. Keen, . 


Roxbury, 


Clothing. 


Mr. Louis H. Fenn, . 


Stockbridge, 


Clothing. 


Miss Grace W. Pitts, 


Athol, .... 


Took 13 patients to Monson. 


Mr. J. F. Holbrook, . 


Palmer, . . 


Magazines. 


Mr. Samuel Rogers, . . . 


Palmer . 


IVXagazines and papers. 


Hon. F. H. Gillett, 


Washington, D.C., . 


Government seeds. 


Mr. E. B. Taylor, 


Palmer, . . 


Magazines. 


Mr. Stephen H. Wright, . 


Palmer, 


Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. T. 0. Esten, 


Palmer . . . 


Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. E. A. Gundersen, 


New Bedford, . 


Clothing. 


Dr. A. 0. Morton, 


St. Albans, Vt., 


One set of books 18 volumes. 


Mr. Samuel Brown, . 


Palmer, 


Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. T. O. Esten, 


Palmer, . . . 


Magazines and papers. 


Mrs. E. F. Morris, 


Monson, 


Magazines. 


Dr. William P. Spratling, 
Mrs. William S. Hyde, 


Sonyea, N. Y., . . 
W"are t m t 


Transactions of National Associa- 
tion, 2 volumes. 

Otip hi tni* p n "n rl t"\,vri IiaaItq 

Wi-lC' [I1LLIU C allU IV? U PJUUixB • 


Eastern Hampden Agricul- 
tural Society. 
Mr. J. D. Holbrook, . 


Palmer, 
Palmer, 


Admission of patients to fair. 
Magazines and papers. 


Mr. E. B. Taylor, 


Palmer, 


Magazines. 


Mr. George S. Jones, 


Boston, 


Magazines. 


Mrs. J. D. Holbrook, 


Palmer, 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Elizabeth N. Howard, . 


Fall River, . 


Clothing. 



22 HOSPITAL FOE EPILEPTICS. [Dec 



Amusements. 

Dances, 47 ; masquerades, 2 ; dances and whist parties 
for employees, 4 ; sessions of dancing school, 30 ; readings 
and impersonations, 5 ; musicales, 4 ; cantata, 1 ; lecture, 1 ; 
illustrated lectures, 5 ; entertainment, legerdemain, 1 ; enter- 
tainment, silhouette cutting, 1 ; entertainment, farces, 1 ; en- 
tertainment, ventriloquism, 2 ; car rides, 3 ; excursions to fair, 
8 ; excursions to Forest Lake, 12 ; excursions to Boston, 2. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. (32. 



23 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent; in this case the approval of a judge 
is required, in addition to the physicians' certificates and the 
notification of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to 
bed early. These restrictions are not irksome when they are 
fully understood, and can be complied with easily. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the Xew London north- 
ern division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad has one terminus in Palmer, 
the other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, 
and the railroad fare is $1.70. 



24 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



A"RTTC!T7ES MADE 


IX 


THE SEWING ROOM. 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


138 


Trousers shortened, pairs, . 


56 


Swabs made, 


131 


Table cloths repaired, . 


3 


Table cloths made, 


74 


Aprons repaired, . 


23 


Long nightshirts made, 


81 


Laundry bags repaired, 


37 


Short nightshirts made, 


69 


Tray cloths repaired, . 


6 


Aprons made, 


157 


Dresses repaired, . 


2 


Undershirts made, 


266 


Pillow cases repaired, . 


18 


Rugs made, .... 


147 


Blankets hemmed, 


12 


Corset covers made, 


134 


Masquerade suits repaired, . 


8 


Chemises made, . 


80 


Skirt shortened, . 


1 


Sash curtains made, 


28 


Undershirts cut, . 


335 


Portieres made, pairs, . 


4 


Shirts cut, .... 


229 


Rubber pillow covers made, 


9 


Bibscut, .... 


117 


Rubber aprons made, . 


3 


Mattress covers cut, 


64 


Trousers made, pairs, . 


167 


Suspenders cut, pairs, . 


248 


Mattress covers made, . 


64 


Pillow ticks cut, . 


111 


Shirts made, .... 


223 


Nightshirts cut, 


160 


Garters made, pairs, . 


178 


Corset covers cut, 


140 


Burial robes, 


14 


Laundry bags cut, 


87 


Hoods made, 


4 


Mattress ticks cut, 


2 


Bed covers made, 


1 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


248 


Coats made, .... 


112 


Vests made, .... 


95 


Bed ticks made, . 


2 


Masquerade suits made, . 


6 


Summer coats made, . 


88 


Laundry bags made, . 


87 


Sheets made, 


83 


Rag bags made, . 


6 


Petticoats made, . 


25 


Bathing caps made, 


12 


Mittens made, pairs, . 


114 


Tea and coffee bags made, . 


25 


Mangle aprons made, . 


20 


Long nightgowns made, 


50 


Dolls made and dressed, 


10 


Short nightgowns made, 


61 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


227 


Holders made, 


12 


Mail bag made, . 


1 


Bag for flower seeds made, . 


1 


Curtains for registers, . 


8 


Neckties made, 


12 


Plasters for head, covered, . 


4 


Bath towels made, 


95 



1906.] PUBLIC 


DOCUMENT — No. 62. 


25 


Dish towels made, 


1 o 
12 


Stretchers made, . . . 


4 


Scrub towels made, 


1 o 


Rugs repaired, . . . 


9 


Strainers made, . 


1 Q 

lo 


Swords repaired, . 


10 


Sofa pillows made, 


Q 

O 


diceis rcpairtiu, ■ • • 


6 


Hot-water bottle covers 




\ ests repaired, . . • 


2 


made, . . . 


/? 




Suspenders repaired, pairs, . 


9 


Pillow ticks made, 




Flags repaired, 


2 


Stand covers made, 


JO 


Coats repaired, . . ■ 


15 


Pillow cases made, pair, 


i 


Sleeves lengthened, pairs, 


10 


Gingham pillow cases made, 


zl 


Window shades repaired, 


7 


Cheese-cloth bags made, 


1U 


Towels repaired, . . • 


24 


Bibs made, . 


QQ 
OV 


Drawers cut, pairs, . • 


316 


Dentist towels made, . 


AAA 
144: 


Mittens cut, pairs, . 


28 


Napkins made, 


1 A A 

144. 


Aprons cut, .... 


216 


Wrapper made, . 


1 


Burial robes cut, . . . 


14 


Bed socks made, pairs, 


n 



Hoods cut, .... 


4 


Camisole made, . 


1 


Nightgowns cut, . 


125 


Sand bags made, . 


A 


Chemises cut, . . . 


110 


Books covered, 


2 


Tea and coffee bags cut, 


25 


Curtains for bookcases, 


8 


Rugs cut, .... 


6 



26 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



AKTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN 
THE WARDS. 



Made. 




Dressing jackets, . 


6 


Aprons, 


212 


Drawers, pairs, 


39 


Autopsy gowns, . 


4 


Dish towels, . 


402 


Bed socks, .... 


31 


Kitchen aprons, . 


15 


Blue coats, .... 


6 


Mattress covers, . 


62 


Blanket, .... 


1 


Masquerade dresses, . 


4 


Bands on drawers, pairs, 


6 






Bureau covers, 


19 


Repaired. 




Button-holes in shirts, . 


5 


Coats, .... 


140 


Button-holes in coats, . 


7 


Bed ticks, 


2 


Button-holes in overalls, 


16 


Bags, .... 


1 


Buttons on shirts, . 


4 


Bibs, .... 


1 


Buttons on coats, . 


4 


Drawers, pairs, . 


150 


Buttons on overalls, pairs, . 


8 


Frocks, .... 


44 


Bookcase curtains, 


2 


Kitchen aprons, . 


73 


Caps, 


13 


Nightshirts, . 


67 


Cleaning cloths, . 


113 


Overalls, pairs, 


103 


Coats, ..... 


21 


Overcoats, . . 


1 


Colored shirts, 


12 


Trousers, pairs, . 


125 


Corset covers, 


84 


Undershirts, . 


93 


Chemises, .... 


6 


Shirts 


274 


Dresses cut, .... 


2 


Socks, pairs, . 


. 5,043 


Dresses, .... 


320 


Union suits, . 


3 


Dresses made over, 


8 


Vests, .... 


18 


Dress sleeves, 


35 







1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



ARTICLES MADE AND EEP AIRED IN 
THE INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



IV Ti t" Ton a mono 

IVlllieilo LUclUc, • a 


4.Q 


Qncnonflcivc ronQ i KPfl 
OUopCliUClO I tJUdll CU, • 


16. 

-LU- 


OllCClo llldUC, i • 




Onordtinfi* pViQit* viindi T*pri 
\JUkH cILIUM Cllctll 1 cUall 131.1 , • 


1 
X 


C^ctncixr V»t> era mnrlp 

V/dlltlV Uc*Ho lllilUc, i 


126 


Sf/rpf nYt pt*o pitpI pt fpri 

CJtl CLijllCl O C V CICILOU, • . 


2 


TVnnQPVG msifi'p 

XIUUoCLS lU CIVIC/, ■ . 


109 


Rarhpi* olifiir vprmirpd 


1 


\1 ottTQQC nf\T7Dl*C TYlQnfl 

1\1 illll csb CO Vol o UlclUC, . 


l ±'±\j 


Jlidoy CLld.lI uptioioicicu, 


i 

i 


1 Qnn/11*1T nn/yo Yt~l O CI o 

judunury odgo LUcH-it", . 


Of 


liuoa icpancu, . • . 


i 


1 0*l*if ell ivtG TYiQtflP 

i> ItLlllSlUl lo 111 till C, . 


XX 


Whiri vpi"iS> iT*Pf? 
YViiip icj^ancu, • • . 




it ci ncuiiio mcn.it;, • ■ 


46 


llnnon ViP/iC vpne. lVPri 

VyKJ LI 1/11 ucus icpdiicti, • > 


9 

a 


JTlllOW lOpo IHcltltJ, . 


OO 


ouit case icpaiicu, i • 


1 
1 


jriiiow sups indue, . . 


7Q9 


Mon^o Gnfioc YViOclo «niva 

ivieii s oiiocs iiiciuc, pans, . 


ZOO 


v^verdiis maue, . . ■ 


^o 
ou 


W7"/~i tvi art Q 1c ci ci o tviano vioivg 

VV OI11CI1 o snocs uiciue, pdllo, 


oy 


Pnnpc m »i rl ci 

XvUgo IlldUC, • • • 


x<\ 


Pillows; fillpH 

JL1HUWO 1111CU, . ■ > 


98^ 
zoo 


v^nemises indue, . • ■ 


9fi 


{ J T I 1 /i Ci Ci Ti CTCll A1\A£" WlQnO 

wince envelopes indue, . 


9 ^Rfi 
£> ,000 


Spmi h plr»trta mnHp 

OLIUU 1/lUlllO lllilUC, ■ • 


79 


PAaffil PQVfic 'nvirifprl 

A WOtCtl LdlUS pillllOU, • ■ 


0\]\J 


uraweis maue, . . . 


93 


Blanks printed, . . . 




Napkins made, . • 


00 


Programs printed, 


l,0Uu 


JJIUB illclUt;, • • • • 


7X 


^^TllTTi VlPVC Ci Q 1* T7 p rl 

1\ UmULIS OttlVt/Ll, • > • 


1 90 


V_/Ucll3 UJaUC) • • • ■ 


71 


\\ r ci c^ 1 ci n pnatc put 
TV UU1C11 L.UdlO tut) ■ 




v csio indue, • . . • 


OO 


\ A ci ci 1 ci cc tt net c /int 

vv ooien vests cue, ■ i 


fil 

0"* 


Aprons made, . . . 


1 KA 
104 


Denim trousers cut, 


yo 


Towels made, 


2,045 


Summer coats cut, 


109 


Blanket made, 


1 


Mittens cut, pairs, 


321 


Undershirts made, 


30 


Goat harness made, 


1 


Ties made, . 


15 


Coat patterns drafted, . 


67 


Pillows renovated, 


913 


Trousers patterns drafted, . 


87 


Sofa pillows filled, 


9 


Head marks for cemetery 




Parts of harness repaired, . 


26 


carved, .... 


7 


Mattresses remade, 


80 


Old broom handles sand- 




Hair picked, pounds, . 


2,000 


papered, .... 


825 


Books repaired, . 


3 


Lectures, essays, specifica- 




Baskets repaired, . 


5 


tions, rules, etc., printed, . 


4,145 


Stand repaired, 


1 


Trousers mended, 


504 



28 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



Coats mended, 


175 


Screens repaired, . 


22 


Vests mended, 


85 


Mops repaired, 


3 


Aprons mended, . 


134 


Baseball mittens repaired, . 


2 


Drawers mended, . 


650 


Chair cushions repaired, 


2 


Shirts mended, 


516 


Tent repaired, 


1 


Undershirts mended, . 


769 


Brushes repaired, . 


2 


Nightshirts mended, 


260 


Wood baskets repaired, 


2 


Overalls mended, . 


115 


Belts repaired, 


2 


Jumpers mended, . 


20 


Hassock repaired, 


1 


Dresses mended, . 


13 


Morris chair made over, 


1 


Skirts mended, 


3 


Golf stick repaired, 


1 


Table covers mended, . 


15 


Strait-jacket eyeletted, . 


1 


Rug mended, 


1 


Men's slippers made, pairs, . 


261 


Stockings mended, 


203 


Rope rugs made, . 


20 


Bath robes mended, 


2 


Mattresses made, . 


85 


Overcoats mended, 


29 


Coat hangers made, 


174 


Sweaters mended, 


5 


Door plates carved, 


7 


Laundry bags mended, 


7 


Note heads printed, 


2,352 


Gloves mended, . 


2 


Office envelopes printed, 




Mittens mended, . 


2 


boxes, .... 


3 


Pillow slips mended, . 


7 


Plays printed, 


2 


Bed ticks mended, 


9 


Woolen trousers cut, . 


106 


Shoes repaired, 


. 1,514 


Denim coats cut, . 


90 


Shoes marked, pairs, . 


113 


Denim vests, 


71 


Umbrellas repaired, 


140 


Overalls cut, 


164 


Chairs repaired, . 


3 


Hammer handles made, 


2 


Chairs reseated, . 


92 


Checker board made, . 


1 


Rugs repaired, 


19 


Vest patterns drafted, . 


65 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 29 



FAKM PEODUCTS 

From Oct. 1, 1905, to Dec. 1, 1906. 



Milk, 304,638 quarts, $15,23190 

Hay, 250 tons, 4,500 00 

Meadow hay, 37 tons, 370 00 

Rowen hay, 39 tons, 478 00 

Oat hay, 5 tons, 60 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons, 900 00 

Green fodder, 44 tons, . . . . . . . . 220 00 

Rhubarb, 4,550 pounds, . . 9100 

Lettuce, 506 heads, ; 18 70 

Green peas, 28£ bushels, 39 25 

Greens, 42 bushels, 2100 

Sweet corn, 14,695 ears; 146 95 

Currants, 116 quarts, . . 11 60 

Beans, 33 bushels, . . . . . . . . . 33 00 

Summer squash, 1,887 pounds, . 56 35 

Winter squash, 6,388 pounds, Ill 77 

Onions, 146£ bushels, 146 50 

Carrots, 363 bushels, 181 50 

Blackberries, 163 quarts, 16 58 

Ripe tomatoes, 138 bushels, 138 00 

Green tomatoes, 48 bushels, 24 00 

Cucumbers, 3,302, 66 04 

Cucumbers for pickles, 20£ bushels, 30 75 

Grapes, 250 pounds, 5 00 

Potatoes, 779 bushels, 545 30 

Beets, 196 bushels, 124 54 

Cabbage, 10,045 pounds, 98 52 

Turnips, 89£ bushels, 45 60 

Parsnips, 425 bushels, ........ 263 00 

Pumpkins, 1,455 pounds, 20 07 

Broom corn, 20 00 

String beans, 49<§ bushels, 49 50 

Peppers, 5 dozen, 1 25 

Pears, 35£ bushels, . . . 49 75 

Peaches, \ bushel, 50 

Plums, 8 quarts ' 80 



Amount carried forward, $24,116 72 



30 



HOSPITAL 



FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward^ $24,116 72 

Wood, 135 cords, 405 00 

Crab apples, 2£ bushels, ........ 2 50 

Apples, 437 barrels, 671 00 

Cider apples, 825 bushels, 66 00 

Vinegar, 2,240 gallons, 336 00 

Pork, 9,473£ pounds, 732 85 

Lamb, 1,046 pounds, 126 30 

Chickens, 10 pounds, 1 50 

Ducks, 14 pounds, 1 68 

Unrendered lard, 90 pounds, 7 77 

Pigs sold, 144 401 50 

Cows, 2, 35 00 

Calves sold, 38, 135 00 

Wool sold, 266^ pounds, 69 23 

Sand, 358 loads, 35 80 

Cabbage plants, 4£ dozen, 50 

Tomato plants, 41 dozen, 6 15 

Vegetables from greenhouse : — 

Cucumbers, 3,737, 404 80 

Radishes, 3 bushels, 12 30 

Greens, 21 bushels, 10 50 

Lettuce, 15 bushels, 15 00 

Spinach, 5 bushels, 5 00 

Cabbage, 98 bushels, 49 00 

Strawberries, 256 quarts, 32 00 

Beans, 14 bushels, 7 00 

Sweet corn, 1,092 ears, 10 92 

Green peas, 7 bushels, 7 00 

Summer squash, 60 pounds, 3 00 

Ripe tomatoes, 9 bushels, 9 00 

Green tomatoes, 6 bushels, 3 00 

Cucumbers for pickles, 1 bushel, 1 50 

Pumpkins, 162, 16 20 

Cabbage plants sold, 100, 25 

Tomato plants, 41£ dozen, 6 22 

Cut flowers, 100 00 

Peppers, 2 bushels, 2 00 

Asparagus, 4 bushels, 8 00 

Beets, 3£ bushels, 2 00 

Watermelons, 3, 45 

Citrons, 83, 4 15 

Celery, 187 bunches, 28 05 

Eggs, 258£ dozen 72 38 



$27,960 22 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



31 



LIST OF PERSONS 



KEGULARLY EMPLOYED Al 1 H h lVLAoaACliUoEl. 10 


Hacdtt a t 


FOR 




Epileptics. 








ouperimenueci, per ^e<ir, ...... 




Sfc3 000 


00 
uu 


assisihui pnysicidn, per jedi, ..... 




1 900 


00 

UU 


Assistant physicians (3), per year, .... 




fiAA 
DUU 


AA 
UU 


.ireasurei., per je<Ai, ....... 




300 
OUU 


00 

UU 


Clerk, per year, ........ 




AAA 
DUU 


AA 
UU 


Stenographer, per month, ...... 




QA 
OU 


AA 
UU 


Office assistants (2), per month, .... 






AA 
UU 


Steward, per year, ....... 




1 000 
1 ,uuu 


00 
UU 


Flvnrr olovV nov mnntVi 

l/l Uii L1C La.} UCI JX1U1JLI1, ...... 




oo 


00 


Supervisor (woman), per month, .... 




QA 

oU 


AA 
UU 


Assistant bupeivioois ^woiDcD, oj , per montn, . . 


£9^ 


00 98 

UU— £.0 


00 
UU 


Supervisor (man), without board, per month, . 




^A 

OU 


AA 
UU 


Assistant supervisors (men, 2), per month, . . 


$QA 


AA Q7 
UU-O/ 


AA 
UU 


Night nurses (women, 6), per month, 


. ID 


AA OO 


f*A 

OU 


Nurses (women, 32), per month, .... 


1 ft 

. lb 


AA O 1 
UU Z± 


AA 
UU 


Night nurses (meD, 6), per month, .... 


no 

. £6 


A A 07 

UU -i( 


AA 
UU 


Nurses (men, 27), per month, ..... 


OQ 


AA QA 

UU-dU 


AA 
UU 


Engineer, per year, ....... 




1 AAA 
1,UUU 


AA 
UU 


Assistant engineer, per month, . . 




OU 


UU 


Helper, per month, ....... 




o c 

oo 


AA 

00 


Firemen (5), per month, ...... 


fcOQ 


AA QA 
UU— OU 


AA 

UU 


Baker, per month, ....... 




4 O 

48 


c o 

08 


Kitchen man, per month, 


$23 


00-27 


00 


Store assistants (2), per month, .... 


. 30 


00-34 


00 


Cooks (5), per month, 


. 22 


00-30 


00 


Assistant cooks (6), per month, 


. 16 


00-18 


00 


Table girls (5), per month, 


. 16 


00-18 


00 


Foreman industrial room, per month, 




45 


00 


Laundress, per month, 




25 


00 


Laundryman, per month, 




30 


00 


Assistant laundresses (6), per month, 


$16 


00-18 


00 



32 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

Farmer, per year, $600 00 

Assistant farmers (15), per month, $20 00-30 00 

Assistant farmer, without board, per month, .... 50 00 

Gardener, per month, 28 00 

Driver, per month, 35 00 

Head carpenter, per day, 3 00 

Assistant carpenters (2), per day, 2 50 

Painter, per day, 2 25 

Mason, per month, 35 00 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



33 



TKEASUKEK'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The report of the finances of this hospital for the fourteen 
months ending Nov. 30, 1906, is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted : — 

Assets. 

Real estate : — 

Cultivated land, 113 acres, .... $17,31100 

Woodland, 21 acres 1,465 00 

Pasturage, 104 acres, 4,487 00 

Farm (under appropriation 1901), viz. : — 

Cultivated land, 40 acres, . . . . 1,600 00 

Woodland, 50 acres, 1,100 00 

Pasturage, 30 acres, 300 00 

Farm (under appropriation 1903), viz. : — 

Cultivated land, 50 acres, .... 1,150 00 

Woodland, 190 acres, 2,850 00 

Pasturage, 60 acres, 900 00 

Water and sewerage systems, .... 38,947 94 

Outside electric lighting (farm group), . . 800 00 

Quarry, 450 00 

Buildings : — 

Original buildings, $39,620 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1895), . . 84,800 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . . 86,600 00 
Nurses' home > 

Electric building \ < under appropriation 1902) , 26,345 00 

Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), . 5,050 00 

Laundry (under appropriation 1901), . . 9,500 00 
Coal trestle for heating purposes, previously 

included under building increase, . . 250 00 



$71,360 94 



Amounts carried forward, .... $252,165 00 $71,360 94 



34 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, 


$252,165 00 


Greenhouse and henhouses, .... 


O CflA AA 
Z,bUU UU 


Farm group (under appropriation 1903), viz, : — 




Nos. 1 and 2, ..... . 


97 Q^7 *9 


XT „ O 


Ct O A Q QC 


Barns, . . . . • . . 


9 897 Q7 


Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), 


1,100 CO 


Vegetable cellar, 


1,463 19 


New building men's north, .... 


75,000 00 


New building women's south, .... 


20,875 00 


Personal estate : — 




Live stock and farm, ..... 




Produce of the farm on hand, .... 


A QQ 4 OA 


Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 


A A KA AA 
4,401) UU 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 


A R. 1 AC CQ 

4o,iuo by 


Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 


id,y/o iy 


vainer iuiniiuie in inmates uepditmeui, . . 


9fi A9A A3 


Personal property of State in administration 






Q 1 7A £7 


rersonai properly or oidie m employees cot- 




tage, ... .... 


1 K A ft CIA 

i,o4y y4 


Personal property of State in nurses' home, . 




Personal property of State in farm group 








Personal property of State in greenhouse, 


1 1 *A Gfi 
l,IOU OO 


Ready-made clothing, ..... 


o 1 ac\ ao 
z,140 bJ 


uiy goous, ....... 


o,oy-± oi 


Provisions and groceries, ..... 


1 £1/1 QA 

1,014 oU 


Drugs and medicines, , 


n iQR A7 


Xllstt HIIJCXILS aliU laUlJIdLUI \ UttHJHO, . • 


9 4.8^ 77 
Z,TtOO < 1 


Fuel 


15,731 43 


Library, 


750 00 


Other supplies undistributed, .... 


5,548 14 



390,237*06 



155,527 84 



Total, $617,125 84 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1905, $2,816 72 

Received from State on special appropriations : — 
Repairs and improvements, 1904, . . . $738 26 

Men's hospital north, 1905, .... 65,089 69 
Furnishings, 1905, 4,117 07 



Amounts carried forward, 



$69,945 02 f 2,816 72 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Amounts brought forward ^ . 


f oy,y-±o 




Women's hospital south, 






Buildings and furnishings, 1906, . ■ 


1 l,oUO 


Q 1 

y l 


Stone crusher, 1906, 


345 


80 


Total from appropriations, 






Received from State for maintenance, 


$114,317 


02 


Received from towns for support of patients, 


37,635 


82 


Received from individuals for support of pa- 








10,094 


46 


Received from soldiers 1 relief for support of 








212 


17 


Received from reimbursements for support of 








1,199 


40 


Received from interest on bank deposit, . 


193 


61 


Received from farm and farm produce, . 


659 


36 


Received from store, ...... 


836 


34 


Received from barrels, junk and sundries, 


219 


30 


Received from expense account of patients, 


91 1 


oy 


Received from shoe shop, .... 




25 


Advance money, State Treasurer, 


20,000 


00 



Total receipts, 



Expenditures. 
Salaries, wages and labor, . 



Food : — 

Butter, |5,079 41 

Beans 57 99 

Bread and crackers, 369 61 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., 1,307 68 

Cheese, 93 24 

Eggs, 2,209 27 

Flour, 3,087 17 

Fish, 1,626 53 

Dried and fresh fruit, 1,355 08 

Meats, 8,442 01 

Milk 223 26 

Molasses and syrup, 456 72 

Sugar, 1,723 46 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, .... 498 56 

Vegetables, . . . . . . . 2,214 50 

Sundries, 753 31 



Amount carried forward, . 



35 

$2,816 72 
82,096 73 



185,582 42 
$270,495 87 

$53,759 94 



29,497 80 
$83,257 74 



36 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, . 



Clothing and clothing material : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, $401 35 

Clothing 741 65 

Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, . 1,235 11 

Furnishing goods, 86 25 

Hats and caps, 55 75 

Leather and shoe findings, .... 766 44 

Sundries 21 64 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . . . $1,595 67 

Brushes, brooms, etc., 246 87 

Carpet, rugs, etc., 781 62 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . . . 532 94 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 358 05 

Kitchen furnishings, 439 15 

Woodenware, buckets, pails, etc., . . . 107 64 

Sundries, 86 39 

Heat, light and power : — 

Coal . 113,814 02 

Electricity 93 89 

Gas, 149 43 

Oil 135 27 

Sundries, 1 70 



3,308 19 



4,148 33 



14,194 31 



Repairs and improvements : — 
Brick, . 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Door, sashes, etc., .... 
Electrical work and supplies, . 

Hardware, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., .... 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 
Roofing and materials, 
Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll), 
Sundries, 



$272 00 
253 24 
43 74 
156 91 

1,339 45 
675 74 
614 54 

1,425 32 

3,226 92 
345 59 
379 58 
32 05 



8,765 08 



Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments, 

Amounts carried forward, . 



$221 57 
916 76 



$1,138 33 $113,673 65 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Amounts brought forward^ . . . $1,138 33 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 1,082 32 

Funeral expenses, 308 30 

Gratuities, 16 98 

Hose, etc., . 233 44 

Labor (not on pay roll), 199 72 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 2,547 46 

Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), . 50 00 

Postage, 374 37 

Printing and printing supplies, ... 98 20 

Return of runaways, 103 74 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 1,402 15 

Stationery and office supplies, .... 275 93 

School books and school supplies, ... 75 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 502 44 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 581 01 

Tobacco, 588 62 

Water, 947 82 

Printing annual report,- 163 06 

Sundries, 853 23 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 



Blacksmith and supplies, $411 82 

Carriages, wagons and repairs, . . . 237 92 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 406 58 

Hay, grain, etc., 6,602 51 

Harness and repairs, 56 77 

Horses, 150 00 

Cows, 370 00 

Labor (not on pay roll), 637 73 

Rent, 

Swill, ........ 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 190 95 

Sundries, . 556 19 



Total expenses for maintenance, 
Other expenses on special appropriations, 
Paid State Treasurer, .... 

Refunded to towns, 

Refunded to individuals, .... 

Sundry payments, 

Expense of patients, 

Total expenditures, .... 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, . 



$113,673 65 



11,467 87 



9,620 47 



$134,761 99 
82,096 73 
51,327 18 
170 33 
70 97 
1 80 
66 87 



$268,495 87 
2,000 00 



$270,495 87 



38 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Resources. 

Cash on hand, $2,000 00 

Balance of maintenance with State Treasurer, 32,353 95 

Bills receivable for board, .... 3,590 11 

Other bills receivable, 25 87 

Unexpended special appropriations, . . 72,247 53 



Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, $ 3,947 16 

Maintenance bills, 3,833 43 

Special appropriation bills, .... 10,092 71 



$110,217 46 



17,873 30 

Resources over liabilities, $92,344 16 



Statement of Appropriations. 





Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 

Last 
Fourteen 
Months. 


Balance. 


Repairs and improvements, . 


$9,640 00 


$S,898 19 


$738 26 


$3 551 


Building, 1905, 


75,000 00 


8,160 34 


65,089 69 


1,749 97 


Furnishings, 1005, . . . 


5,000 00 


233 66 


4,117 07 


649 27 


Building and furnishings, 1906, 


80,000 00 




11,805 91 


68,194 09 




2,000 00 




345 80 


1,654 20 




$171,640 00 


$17,292 19 


$82,096 73 


$72,251 OS 



1 The balance of $3.56 on taxes due on repairs and improvements is not available. 



Nurses' Training School Fund. 

Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1905, 124 27 

Fourteen months' receipts, 588 05 

$612 32 

Fourteen months' payments, 449 00 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1906, § 163 32 



Investment. 
Deposited in Palmer National Bank, 



8163 32 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



39 



Patients 1 Money. 



Balance on hand Sept. 30, 1906, $417 01 

Fourteen months 1 receipts, 1,429 56 



$1,846 57 

Fourteen months 1 payments, 1,308 47 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1906, $538 10 

Investment. 

Palmer National Bank, $62 40 

Palmer Savings Bank, 456 00 

Cash in safe, 19 70 



8538 10 

Very respectfully, 

WALTER C. LANG, 

Treasurer, 

Dec. 1, 1906. 



This certifies that I have compared the treasurer's report for fourteen months 
ending Nov. 30, 1906, with the hooks kept at the institution and find them to agree. 
The cash account shows a balance in the treasurer's hands of $2,000, as follows: — 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, §553 56 

Cash vouchers, etc., not entered, 1,440 05 

Cash in safe at hospital 6 39 



32,000 00 



Dec 14, 1906. 



GEO. L. CLARK, 

Auditor. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



• ili WHCOJ) -st" eO t- CO t-O-l-CSCOoOt-CT! 



<35 eo ao t- ( 
<odo 



I O -t O — I I u- 



OKOaOMCOOOffl 



>— <0 O 0> O Oa ( 



COM -it-xw « 



o oo <o o co 

O0 SO 00 



n .o » -j o i in x 



•i-Ht-CC I iCt-(N I t-00»OiO«M I HOI 

cm eo • • • • 



i t-< i- eo to ■ 
to m eo I 



5- 



4 
Is 



• ? 

f.3 Is 



3 2 



s 



» « ® s. 



? a 

s a-2'g" 



■o e ea g o 



■3 -a 

5 a g a 



„ o, - 2 ® S ® i 

•oaQsa.2 eo--«is 

- 1« 2 £ 2 I s 



o o a 

2 § 3 c3 c3 e3 ea .2 ©-S 
a> « "3 T3 a a t> q . 



* ® w - 

^-.o'S' 5 

o a 1 1 ^ s; ° « ^ 



5 13 

« & 2 
O, o s 

2 S.2 



o o » s •■ 

a a a^s 

3 3 3 ea^ 



44 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 




1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



•s aam ok 



I I HNHHOHCO' 



•S.I91H0JVL 



<m r-i ■ 



I ITS i— I i^ <M to I HSl I Si 



i-H i— i I - O X 



t- <N i— I <N <N 



?l H ■<* (fl 5» (M N 



•s.ioqnM 



SO CI «<3 rH <N 



HI b 



•sjamoj\[ 



C5 l-l^f i 



<M eo i i—i i ffi 



i ia i i si -f 



■ 8.181^0 J\[ 



t— i—l I I 00- 



■ — 



,fcc . 

0^05 

£ s- 

111 

SCO 



*3 



«! o S b O m £ 55 Ph P3 « a> £ aa £ 



-2 ? 



46 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





First admitted 
to Any 
Hospital. 


Other 
Admissions. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


A. — Insane: — 
























1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 




2 


- 


2 


1 


2 


3 


3 


2 


5 


Middlesex, 


o 


2 


4 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 












1 


1 




1 


1 


Suffolk, 


4 




y 






2 





g 












10 




13 


10 


3 


13 




8 


8 


16 


12 


7 


19 


20 


15 


~35~ 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over), . 


5 


5 


10 


1 


1 


2 


6 


6 


12 


Country districts (under 10,000), . 


3 


3 


6 


11 


6 


17 


14 


9 


23 


B- — Saner- 






















1 


2 


S 




1 


1 


1 


3 


4 




4 


1 


5 






1 


4 


2 


6 




5 


3 


8 


1 




1 


6 


3 


9 




1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 




4 


1 


5 


3 




3 


7 


1 


8 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 




10 


6 


16 


4 


6 


10 


14 


12 


26 


Norfolk, . . 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 




3 


4 


7 






1 


4 


4 


8 


Suffolk 


14 


12 


26 


5 


3 


8 


19 


15 


34 




6 


3 


9 








6 


3 


9 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over), . 
Country districts (under 10,000), . 


50 
38 
12 


34 
24 
10 


84 
62 
22 


16 
10 

6 


11 

9 
2 


•27 
19 

8 


66 
48 
18 


45 
33 
12 


111 

81 
30 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



Unmarried, 
Married, . 
Widowed, 
Divorced, 
Unknown, 

Totals, 



Insane. 



16 



Sane. 



50 



34 



Totals. 



58 



100 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 47 

6. — Occupations of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



MALES. 





j Insane. 


09 

c 

83 

ce 


Totals. 




Insane. 


• 
sj 

no 


Totals. 


Carpenter, . 




1 


1 

1 


Mechanics, 


1 


2 


3 


Clprks 


- 


2 


2 


Newsboy, . 






1 


Cloth sponger, . 




1 




Office boy, 






1 


Clothier, . 


1 


" 




Operative, 


1 




1 


Currier, 


1 






Peddler, . 






1 


Draftsman, 




1 




Porter, 






1 


Druggist, . 




1 




Salesmen, . 




J 


3 


Elevator boy, 




1 




Scholars, . 


1 




2 


Errand boys, 




2 




Shoemaker, 






1 


Expressman, 




1 




Teamster, 


1 




1 


Farmer, 




1 




Waiters, . 




2 


2 


Hatter, 




1 




No occupation, . 


1 


19 


20 


Janitor, 
Laborers, . 




1 












. 1 


4 




Totals, 


8 


50 


58 


Meat cutter, 




1 













FEMALES. 



Domestics, . 




3 


3 


Stenographer, . 




1 


1 


Housekeepers, . 


1 


1 


2 


Telephone operative, 




1 


1 


Housewives, 
Saleswoman, 
Scholars, . 


1. 


5 
1 
2 


6 
1 
2 


No occupation, . 


6 


19 


25 




Totals, 


8 


34 


42 


Seamstress, 




1 


1 











WIFE OR DAUGHTER OF — 



Clerk, 




1 


1 


Painter, 








Engineer, . 




1 


1 


Printer, 








Farmers, . 




2 


2 


Shoemaker, 








Laborers, . 


2 




2 


Storekeeper, 








Machinist, . 




1 


1 


Tailor, 








Mason, 




1 


1 


Woodcutter, 








Merchant, . 
Operatives, 




1 

3 


1 

3 












Totals, 


2 


16 


18 



HOSPITAL 



FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



CO I I I t- I I t- 



IHS5 I HHH 



M 

o . 

•< >* 

Eh co 

H Cm 

•< a 

x - 

- a 



-si Z 

2 * 



XNHHHH I CO I I I t~ I t- 



•SIB10X 



CO I MN^I I MN' 



Q . 

< iM 

EH /. 

H Ph 

-< a 

co - 

as a 



•S[BK>X 



Eh 

Eh w 

hi! S 



'CNi-H I I 00 



I. ■£. X 33 JO CO 00 CO CO OD 
CO CD CD 



"©lool-ooosoo 
rr-ooooooocoo 

aDicoisomoosoo 
a> ej _ 

62£ 



.2 a 
h9 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62, 



EH 
r- 

I = 



- _ 



•SITJ40J, 



at I I I SI — 



r x — - so — 



S 5S 

5 is 



IT**"*" 2 j j 



50 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

8. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any 

Hospital. 



Predisposing Causes. 



EXCITING CAUSES. 


Admitted. 


HEREDITARY 
TENDENCY. 


NECROTIC 
TENDENCY. 


ALCOHOLIC 
TENDENCY. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


= 

s 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


m 

"2 
§ 


Totals. 


Insane. 
Physical : — 
Head injury, 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


1 




1 














Totals, . 


_ 


1 


1 




1 


1 














Unknown, 


8 




7 


15 


3 


1 




4 














Totals, . 


8 


8 


16 


3 


2 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


Sane. 


























Physical : — 


























Brain tumor, 


1 




1 




- 






- 


- 


- 




- 


Childbirth, 




2 


2 




















Excitement and indi- 


























gestion, . 


1 




1 


1 




1 














General paralysis, . 




1 

1 


1 




















Head injury, 
Hemiplegia, 


4 




4 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 




- 




2 


1 


3 




















Indigestion, 


1 
l 




i 




















Pregnancy, 




1 


1 




















Rachitis, . 


3 


2 


5 


2 


2 


4 














Scarlet fever, . 


1 




1 




















Syphilis, . 




1 


1 




















Mental : — 


























Fright, 




3 


3 




















Totals, . 
Unknown, 

Totals, . 

Aggregates, . 
Unknown, 

Aggregates, . 


13 
37 

50 

13 
45 


11 

23 

34 

12 

30 


24 
60 

84 

25 
75 


5 
7 

12 

5 
10 


2 

5 

7 

3 
6 


7 
12 

19 

8 
16 














58 


42 


100 


15 


9 


24 









1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62, 



I i— > CN <— ■• I « C W N O I O iO IO 
hhih(N!N I OS I o 



O I *Q>0 I 



I I I I I tN^^O I OIN I (N 







■ 

c 
=- 


1 1 r-> 


1 CO CO iO N 


CM CM 
QO 


qo 


12.68 


a 

2 


£ 

N 


Fe mules. 


1 I I 1 1 ^ co ^ CO t> 
1— 1 




«. 

CO 


14.67 






Males. 


1 | rH «H 


1 OS t-- — o> o 




o 


11.27 



It-i^i i i cm o co eon to 



III I I I H | (Q(M CO CM 00 



• 1 — < 1 — I I I I HH ^rH 



I IQ <M | CM | | | I 



I I 

CO CO <© 



I (MHO) I H | | | | CO !N GO 



I 09 tH e* | H | | | | t^^-t GO 



c 
- o 

o a 



o o 

s a 

CO <M 
O O 
CO CO 



CW 02 CO 02 

u S C u 

s3 s3 s3 :3 
oj cp cu cj 

>^ >5 

(NiOOO « 
S3 

1-1 CM 
Li 

> 
O 



02 .. 

si 

M 



n 

H 



3 

c 

o 
e 
M 

03 
bJD 



52 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



Totals. 


•SIBJOX 


^GM 1 


CO CO CO S!D 1 H 
CM CM rH iO 


CO co »0 




rH 1 1 


rH i-l lO h CM 1 1 
HH CM 


CO CO OS 
CM CM rH 


•S9IBK 


CO CM 1 


lO lO CO CO ^ 1 rH 
rH y— CO 


H H CO 


d 

H 

5 




I l 


t>- t^- CO t>. rH | | 


CO CO 




I I 


CO >OH | | 


CO CO O 


•89113K 


O 1 1 


o o «o I 1 1 


CM CM CM 
i—*j—< rH 


Not improved. 


•SIBIOX 


y-> 1 1 


rH rH | C5 W 1 H 


CO CO OS 


•83I8TH3J 


rH | | 


HH | rH | | 


iOO ■<*< 




1 1 I 


II 1 >C CM 1 rH 


co co »o 


— 

> 
o 

s 

a 


•8iB?ox 


CO *H I 


t~ C-- iO CO CM 1 1 


00 CO ^ 




CO 1 1 


CO CO CM (Mill 


CM CM O 


•S3[BJVt 


CO rH I 


^ CO tJI CM 1 1 


CO CO ^t< 


Capable of 
| Self-soppokt. 


•8IBJOX 


1 rH | 


rH rH | lO 1 1 1 




•saiBtnaj 


1 1 1 


II 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 


•83[Bre 




rH rH | O 1 1 1 




ft 
m 
1 

> 
o 

s 


•81BJ0X 


1 1 1 


II 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 


•S8IBOI8J 


1 1 1 


II 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 


•89IBK 


III 


II 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 


NUMBER OF THE ADMISSION. 


A. — Insane epileptics : — 

First to this hospital, 
Second to this hospital, 
Third to this hospital, 

Total cases, .... 
Total persons, .... 

First admitted to any hospital, 

B. — Sane epileptics : — 

First to this hospital, 
Second to this hospital, 
Third to this hospital, 
Fourth to this hospital, 

Total cases, .... 
Total persons, .... 

First admitted to any hospital, 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 5a 



11. — Causes oj Death. 





Insane. 


Sank. 


Totals. 




00 

"3 


Females. 


n 
at 
© 
Eh 


m 

"2 


3 
"3 
a 

ft) 


© 


CO 

"5 


Females. 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 




























1 


- 


1 


l 




1 


Cerebral cyst, . 








1 




1 


l 




1 


Epilepsy, .... 


3 


1 


A 

rr 


2 


o 

a 


4 


5 


o 

6 


Q 





i 




1 




1 
1 


l 


i 
i 


1 


2 


Exhaustion from epilepsy, 


Q 
O 


1 


A 


9 


1 
1 


Q 
O 




2 


7 


QldXUo cpilcpilCUs, . • 




1 


1 


3 


2 


5 


3 


3 


6 


Respiratory system : — 




















Pneumonia, broncho, 




1 


1 










l 


i 

l 


Pulmonary thrombosis, 


1 
1 




1 
1 












1 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 


1 

I 


2 


Q 
o 










2 


3 


General : — 




















Cancer of the liver, . 








1 

i 




i 

A 


! 




1 










1 


- 


1 






1 


Gangrene of foot, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Shock and hemorrhage, . 


1 




1 












1 


Suicide by arsenic poison- 








1 




1 






1 


Totals, 


10 


7 


17 


12 


6 


18 


22 


13 


35 



54 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



All Other admissions. 


WHOLE KNOWN 
PERIOD 
OF HOSPITAL 
RESIDENCE. 




i i i i i i i-i eo ifl I 


CO , 


9 

114.66 


•S9JBU19J 


1 1 1 1 1 1 .-■ <H ©4 1 


* i 


-* 00 
OS 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 64 CO 1 


lO 1 


»o oo 

04 


WHOLE KNOWN PERIOD 
OF DISEASE. 


X 
04 

_ 

s 


•S[inOX 


I I J i I | I 1 9 HI 


Ol I 


00 
CM 




i i I I i i I I e» 




"»* co 

04 






1 CO 

T i 


INSANITY. I 




1 1 1 1 1 1 r4 CO O 1 


O 1 


106.881 




1 1 1 1 1 1 i-4 i— 1 <M 1 




-* s 




I ill i i t e* eo I 






First admitted to Any Hospital. 


WHOLE DURATION OF 
ATTACK . 


X 

- 

- 




i i i i i i i eo eo <m 


00 1 


00 t~ 
CO 

i 


■89JBIU9J 


1 ■ 1 j 1 ' 1 1 1 <S tH 




" 1 








- S 


INSANITY. | 




1 1 1 1 i-4 04 04 64 1 r4 




cs 


■saiKiuaj 






co oo 
*- 


•89IBK 




1 2 


HOSPITAL 
RESIDENCE. 


"Sjiriox 


1 1 1 1 94 CM i-4 CO 1 1 


QO i 


X S 

S3 


•99XI?lU9 L i 








•891BK 


i i i i in e* i ih i i 


iC 1 


uo 00 

00 
04 


DURATION BEFORE 
ADMISSION. 


»H 

os 

04 

« 
- 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <N IN 


00 1 


oo K3 

s 


•89IBIU9J 


i i i i i i t . i e> ih 






•B9H?Jfl 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ©4 e» r4 




00 

" I 


INSANITY. | 


•spnox 






IO 

00 t- 

oJ 


•S91BUI9J 




co 

eo eo 

CO 


•S9lb'K 






•o eo 


Q 
O 

3 
s 


Congenital 

Under 1 month, .... 
From 1 to 3 months, 

3 to 6 months, 

6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years,' 

2 to 5 years 

5 to 10 years, .... 

10 to 20 years 

Totals, 

Unknown, ....... 

Totals 

Average of known cases in months, 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No 




Public Document No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFPICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 

FOR THE 

Year eistdlng November 30, 1907. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POT TEE PEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Squaee. 
1908. 



Public Document 



No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



MASSACHUSETTS V^** 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) , 



Year ending November 30, 1907. 




fo^ BOSTON: 
WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 

1908. 

C 



^AN31 1811 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



3 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, .......... 5 

Trustees' Report, . . . . . . . . . .7 

Superintendent's Report, . . . . . . . . .11 

General Information, ......... 19 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room, . . . .20 

Articles made and repaired in the Wards, . . . .22 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Room, ... 24 
Farm Products, ........... 25 

List of Persons regularly employed, ...... 27 

Treasurer's Report, .......... 29 

Statistical Tables, ...... ... 37 



OFFICEES 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital foe Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, 
CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary, 
MABEL W. STEDMAX, 
HEXRY P. JAQUES, M.D., 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D 
WIXFORD X. CALDWELL, 
MARY P. TOWXSLEY, 



Bostox. 

Grotox. 

Brooklixe. 

Lexox. 

Daltox. 

Sprixgfield. 

Sprixgfield. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., . 
MORGAX B. HODSKIXS, M.D., 
EDWARD A. KEXXEDY, M.D., 
ALDEX V. COOPER, M.D., 
MELYIX E. COWEX, . 
EDITH E. SMITH, 
CHARLES F. SIMOXDS. 
GEORGE E. BATES, . 
GEORGE H. GALLUP, 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assista?it Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assist an t Ph ysicia n . 
Clerk. 

Steward and Storekeeper. 

Engineer. 

Farmer. 



WALTER E. HATCH, .... Clerk and Treasurer. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

Dr. E. G. BRACKETT, .... Consulting Orthopedic Surgeon. 



(Untnmonwaltlj of MiXB&at\)wsttB 



TRUSTEES' EEPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics re- 
spectfully submit the following report for the year ending ~Nov. 
30, 1907. 

The membership of the Board of Trustees remains unchanged. 
The two members whose terms expired during the past year, 
Mrs. Mary P. Townsley and Mr. Winford Caldwell, both 
of Springfield, were reappointed by the Governor and duly 
confirmed. 

In September, 1907, Dr. Melvin E. Cowen was appointed 
assistant physician. 

The treasurer of the hospital, Mr. Walter C. Lang, resigned 
Sept. 23, 1907, and Mr. Walter E. Hatch was appointed his 
successor. 

On November 12, Miss Mary W. Wentworth, head clerk, re- 
signed, to our regret, after eight years of faithful service. 

The new building for 100 male patients was opened Oct. 17, 
1906 ; it now contains 100 patients. The new building for 
women is completed but not yet furnished. 

The number of patients in the hospital has increased during 
the past year. On Xov. 30, 1906, there were 292 males and 
251 females, a total of 543; on Nov. 30, 1907, there were 323 
males and 271 females, a total of 594. 

Through the additional space in the new men's building, 
we have alleviated the overcrowding on the male side, and can 
now care for our male patients comfortably and suitably. 

During the past year the law regulating the admission of pa- 
tients has been changed, so that any person otherwise suitable 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



ten years old or over can be admitted. In other words, the 
age limit has been extended to include persons between the ages 
of ten and fourteen. As the number of children increases, as it 
inevitably will, it will be advisable to make special provision 
for them. It will probably be wise before long to eliminate the 
age limit entirely and permit the hospital to receive all children. 
When this is done the problem of caring for them will be in 
many ways simplified. The subject is now being carefully con- 
sidered by the Board. 



Number of admissions during the year, . . . . . 151 

Number of discharges during the year, ..... 155 

Number of deaths during the year, ...... 34 

Total number of cases treated during the year, . . . 727 

During the present year we have received the following special 
appropriations : — 

Horse stable, ' . . . $6,000 

Alterations and improvements, ...... 3,400 

Construction of silos, ........ 1,100 



The need of these was fully explained in the last report. 
For the present year the trustees have asked for the following 
special appropriations : — 

A. — For the removal and repair of cow barn and hay barn, . $8,500 

B. — For construction and furnishing of a building for male em- 
ployees, .......... 6,215 

C. — For completing and furnishing rooms on the ground floor 

of the women's south building, for female employees, . . 3,900 

D. — For constructing two bread ovens in the kitchen building, 2,600 

E. — For renewal of heating pipes in the administration building, 350 

F. — For purchasing and installing ensilage cutter and motor, 850 



Total, k. . . $22,415 

These have been approved by the State Board of Insanity. 

The reasons which have made us feel it wise to ask for the 
above appropriations this year will be given in detail in the 
superintendent's report. They may be briefly summed up here. 
A. — The present situation of the barns is both unsightly and 
inconvenient ; it is, moreover, expensive. We lose each year an 



r 

1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 9 



amount of money and of time which unduly increases our cur- 
rent expenses, and which we deem it our duty to save, if we 
are permitted to do so, with the outlay mentioned above. 

B. — It has been long a problem to arrange for our male 
employees. There are more than we can properly accommodate 
under present conditions. The opening of the new men's build- 
ing for 100 patients and the prospective opening of the new 
women's building for 100 patients, increasing the number of 
patients at the hospital by 200, will of itself cause an increase 
in the number of employees to be provided for. An additional 
increase was suddenly thrust upon us last year by the passage 
of the eight-hour law, which, however beneficial a measure, en- 
tails an expense to the hospital which should be duly provided 
for. 

C. — We find that by completing and furnishing certain 
rooms on the ground floor of the women's south building we 
shall be able to accommodate more cheaply and conveniently 
than in any other way female employees, for whom we have 
no proper arrangements. 

D. — The ovens in the kitchen building are badly needed for 
the baking necessary for our increased number of inmates. 

E. — The renewal of the heating pipes in the administration 
building, which was built in 1896, is thought advisable to im- 
prove circulation of steam, to prevent leakage and freezing and 
to economize the amount of steam used. 

F. — By installing an ensilage cutter and accessories we shall 
be able to make use of our silos to the best advantage. 

During this year the new women's building has been built 
and will shortly be furnished. We hope that it may be opened 
for patients by Jan. 1, 1908. 

The horse stable has been built and is now completed. The 
minor improvements and alterations, for which last year's ap- 
propriations were granted, are being carried out. 

The following repairs have been made: many asphalt floors 
have been relaid; the plaster in the nurses' home and in Hyde 
cottage and No. 3 farm group has been renewed ; the water pipe 
to the south reservoir was relaid; the barn floors, which have 
given us so much trouble (the barn was built before the exist- 
ence of the present hospital), have been repaired; much work 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



has been done on the underdrains and catch-basins ; two piazzas 
have been replaced. 

The amount of work of this kind is exceptional and not 
likely to recur at present. 

It has been found, after careful examination and investiga- 
tion, that it is not possible to obtain sufficiently responsible at- 
tendants unless they are paid at least reasonable wages. We 
have established a wage rate by which we give to male attend- 
ants $25 a month at the beginning of the first year, and if they 
prove satisfactory we expect to raise this to $30 at the end of 
a year. Female attendants begin at $20 per month, and this 
in like manner is raised to $25 per month at the end of a year. 
This rate seems to be generally agreed upon among the State 
institutions. It is hardly necessary to call the attention of those 
interested in institutions such as ours to the extreme importance 
of obtaining the proper kind of attendants. They must be 
active, vigilant, sober, honest, and, above all, kind and patient 
with those who are committed to their care, many of whom are 
mentally afflicted, nervous, irritable and unreasonable, some- 
times even violent. Even with the most careful supervision 
attendants have many opportunities to act of themselves for 
good or for ill towards their patients, and there is, perhaps, no 
one thing about which our trustees have greater anxiety than the 
behavior of the attendants, their moral character and their atti- 
tude towards those under their charge. It is probable that more 
evils have in the past occurred in hospitals through incompe- 
tent, careless or vicious attendants than from any other cause. 
Yet they cannot be overlooked every moment. As they must be 
responsible they should not be underpaid. They should be — 
would that they all could be — above suspicion. 

The trustees believe that the past year has been one of quiet 
but steady progress for the hospital. 

WILLIAM K BULLARD, M.D., Chairman. 
CHARLES A. CLOUGH, Secretary. 
MABEL W. STEDMAK 
HEISTRY P. JAQUES, M.D. 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D. 
WIXFORD K CALDWELL. 
MARY P. TOWNSLEY. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. (52. 



11 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The following report is respectfully submitted. 

I am glad to report that the past year has been one without 
serious accident. When we consider the conditions under which 
we work, the variety of disordered temperaments we have to 
deal with, and the necessary association of irritable persons, 
this becomes a matter of congratulation. The advisability of 
bringing together persons who react individually on one an- 
other has been a subject of much comment. On the whole, the 
theme has been well worked out, and I am positively of the 
opinion that the discipline acquired by these persons is useful 
to them. It not only makes them easier to deal with when they 
return home, but actually has a curative effect, from the fact 
that they acquire reasonable self-control by the enforced exer- 
cise of this trait. 

Our tables show explicitly the number of patients, the variety 
of their disorders associated with epilepsy and the results of 
treatment. 

An element which has been little dwelt upon is the ad- 
vantages that are gained when a patient remains in the hospital 
for a long time without having epileptic seizures. These ad- 
vantages occur in a large number of instances, and the person 
is practically cured while he is a resident here. 

We have a small percentage of recoveries, and the most of 
the cases referred to above would speedily relapse if they should 
go back to their home methods of living. The routine life, the 
reasonable restrictions, self-control enforced by proper regula- 
tions, medicine and other treatment, as indications call for 
them, each forms an element in good results obtained. 

I can only speak in the highest terms of the equipment which 
has been furnished by the continued efforts of your Board. 



12 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



While strict economy has been observed in buildings and fittings, 
we feel that, compared with institutions of this class in other 
States and countries, we have the beginning of a most promis- 
ing work. 

The methods of treatment have been sufficiently outlined in 
the different publications. It seems, however, desirable to say 
that almost any treatment which takes the interest of the pa- 
tient, diverts his attention from his accustomed lines and makes 
him feel that something is being done for him is useful. In 
this belief we make very large use of our hot-air cabinets, static 
apparatus, douches, local treatment of the throat and nose, 
school, gymnastic training and manual labor, and medical 
treatment in its proper place; but the effort is made to reduce 
drugging to a minimum. 

As to the use made of the appropriations for last year the 
treasurer's report covers every detail. I can say that each item 
of expense in our special appropriations has been of great ad- 
vantage to us, and that our equipment as it stands to-day fur- 
nishes one of the best opportunities for proper classification that 
I have ever seen. 

Eor the future I put before your Board the result of our 
studies during the year, and present the desirability of asking 
for appropriations for the following six items : — 

A. — Eor removal and repair of cow barn, hay barn and 
horse barn. 

B. — For building and furnishing a building for male em- 
ployees. 

C. — For finishing and furnishing sleeping rooms, sitting 
room, bath, etc., on ground floor of the women's south building, 
for female employees. 

D. — For building two bread ovens in the room originally 
designed for them in the kitchen building. 

E. — For renewal of heating pipes in the administration 
building, for the purpose of improving the circulation of steam, 
preventing freezing and leaking and to economize in the amount 
of steam used. 

F. — For purchasing and installing ensilage cutter, with 
motor, etc. 

In regard to the last five items there seems to be no necessity 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



of any further argument than the mere statement of the need. 
The conditions are so well understood by your Board that I 
can add nothing of advantage. In regard to the first item, which 
has been in our budget twice already and for which appropria- 
tion has not been made, although properly urged by your Board 
and fully approved by the State Board, it seems desirable that 
a sufficient statement should be introduced here as to the rea- 
sons for again urging this point. I have briefly summarized 
these reasons, as follows : — 

The advantages of this change will be apparent on looking 
over the situation. The main part of our farm buildings are 
now, through the purchase of the new land, at the Plumley 
place. This should be the headquarters for farming, and it is 
desirable to have our barns in their vicinity for convenience of 
administration and for economy, saving the service of at least 
one permanent employee. If the yellow barn remains where it 
is quite an expenditure should be made in renewing the floors, 
and other repairs. 

The silos are poor and must be rebuilt ; the basement is rot- 
ting, though it has been renewed three times in fourteen years. 

The noise from the cows is often a trouble to persons in the 
night. 

The appearance of the grounds would be very much improved 
and the value of the institution increased. 

Permanent work could then be done in finishing the roads 
and grounds in this part. 

In case of sickness among the animals it is desirable to have 
the head farmer near the cattle and horses and pigs for prompt 
attention. 

He can give better oversight to all this work if the barns are 
placed nearer together. 

The needs in the future have been well studied. While a 
large number of these are very urgent, it is easy to select a few 
that are the most pressing. It appears to me that study of the 
care and treatment of children is one that will occupy our at- 
tention most fully during the coming year. 

It is important that these children should be housed at a 
suitable distance from the present buildings; probably a sep- 



14 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



arate colony, within moderately easy reach of the main institu- 
tion, will be the most convenient method. 

I consider that we shall need in this group accommodations 
for boys and girls in suitable divisions. There must also be 
kitchen and dining room accommodations for them as well as 
for employees. Some supervising head, which would probably 
be medical, teachers and necessary nurses and outside attend- 
ants must be provided. The school-rooms will be an important 
consideration. To include all these elements and supply all 
the other needs that will come up as we go on with the work will 
be a matter of great importance. 

We cannot begin too soon to carefully and systematically 
study this question. 

The practice of sending nurses to assist in families has been 
continued and amounts to a system of district nursing. During 
the last year our nurses have thus worked a total of 312 days. 

Articles written. 

1. Injuries of Epileptics, and how they occur. 

2. Myoclonus Epilepsy (report of two cases). 

3. The Diagnosis of Valvular Heart Disease. 

4. Heredity as a Factor in the Causation of Epilepsy. 

5. President's address at the Richmond meeting of the National As- 
sociation for the Study of Epilepsy and the Care and Treatment of 
Epileptics. 

6. Revision of Rules for All Departments. 

7. Chart for Examination of Patients. 

Autopsies and Findings. 

No. 524. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 2, 1906. Cerebral hemorrhage; 
interstitial nephritis; sclerosis of coronary arteries and aorta; sclerosis 
of cerebral arteries; hypostatic congestion of lungs. 

No. 936. — Male. Autopsy, Dec. 4, 1906. Dilation of heart ; general 
arterio sclerosis; chronic nephritis, decubitus; adherent scalp; absence 
of diploe; adherent dura; internal hemorrhagic pachymeningitis; 
oedema of brain; dilation of ventricles. 

No. 731. — Male. Autopsy, Dec. 4, 1906. Dilation of heart; cedema 
and hypostatic congestion of lungs, old pleuritis; adherent scalp. 

No. 560. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 28, 1906. Lobar pneumonia; 
hypostatic congestion of lungs; cerebral sclerosis. 

No. 519. — Female. Autopsy, Jan. 16, 1907. (Edema and hypo- 
static congestion of lungs; acute splenitis; chronic hydrocephalus. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



No. 12.22. — Female. Autopsy, Jan. 23, 1907. Hypostatic conges- 
tion of the lungs; acute splenitis; oedema of brain. 

No. 715. — Male. Autopsy, Feb. 15, 1907. Pulmonary thrombosis; 
lobar pneumonia, old pleuritis; chronic diffuse nephritis; acute splen- 
itis; chronic cholecystis. 

No. 1279. — Male. Autopsy, March 17, 1907. Lobar pneumonia; 
hypostatic congestion of lungs; acute splenitis. 

No. 421. — Male. Autopsy, April 6, 1907. Hypostatic congestion of 
lungs; acute splenitis. 

No. 199. — Female. Autopsy, May 12, 1907. Hypostatic congestion 
of lungs,' old pleuritis. 

No. 897. — Female. Autopsy, June 10, 1907. Decubitus ; old pleu- 
ritis; hypostatic congestion of the lungs. 

No. 1062. — Male. Autopsy, June 16, 1907. Dry gangrene of foot ; 
acute splenitis; chronic nephritis; arterio sclerosis; hypostatic conges- 
tion of lungs. N 

No. 1271. — Male. Autopsy, Sept. 13, 1907. Examination limited 
to the head. Area of softening 7 centimeters in diameter in the left 
frontal lobe, which had ruptured into the left lateral ventricle. 

No. 582. — Female. . Autopsy, Sept. 13, 1907. Hypostatic conges- 
tion of the lungs; cerebral arterio sclerosis; chronic nephritis. 

No. 1012. — Male. Autopsy, Oct. 29, 1907. CEdema of the lungs. 

No. 568. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 4, 1907. Hypostatic congestion 
of the lungs; chronic cholecystis. 

No. 198. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 7, 1907. Hypostatic congestion 
of the lungs; acute splenitis; cyst of right ovary. 

No. 619. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 13, 1907. Hypostatic congestion 
of the lungs; chronic nephritis; fibroids of the uterus. 

The work done by your consulting orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. 
E. G. Brackett, of Boston, deserves especial commendation. 

Operations. 

Three transplantations of tendons. 
Two operations on scalp. 
Five tenotomies. 

One genu valgum McEwen's operation. 
Two circumcisions. 
One trephination. 



16 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 

List of Graduates. 



[Dec. 



NAME. 



Class. 



Occupation. 



Address. 



Fannie C. Cronin, 
Mary E. Kilduff, 
Emma S. McKeever, . 
Julia O'Brien, 
Edith E. B. Townsend, 
Carroll W. Briggs, 
Annabelle Manwarring, 
Edwin S. Manwarring, 
James L. McKeever, 
Walter L. McKeever, 
Hattie E. Rowe, . 
Alice B. Smith, . 
Marguerite J. Casey, 
Catherine Daley, 
Georgie A. Nute, 
George J. Flint, . 
Mae D. Brown, . 
Annie A. Caldwell, 
Louis A. Fontaine, 
Frank L. Morway, 
Augusta Tanski, . 
Christina McLellan, 
Theresa A. Brown, 
Lutie F. Campbell, 
Mary G. Hancock, # 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
Mary A. Woodard, 
Samuel E. Chase, 
William L. Paine, 



1901, 
1901, 
1901, 
1901, 
1901, 
1902, 
1902, 
1902, 
1902, 
1902, 
1902, 
1902, 
1903, 
1903, 
1903, 
1903, 
1905, 
1905, 
1905, 
1905, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1907, 
1907, 
1907, 
1907, 
1907, 
1907, 



Supervisor at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
Private nursing, 

At State Farm, 

Private nursing, 

Married, ..... 
At Boston City Hospital, . 

Head nurse at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

Head nurse at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

At State Farm, 



Private nursing, 

Bookkeeping, .... 
Private nursing, 

Connecticut Hospital for Insane,. 
At Stamford Hall, . 

Supervisor at Massachusetts 
Hospital for Epileptics. 

Assistant Supervisor at Massa- 
chusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

Private nursing, 

Restaurant keeper, . 

Apothecary at Massachusetts 

Hospital for Epileptics. 
New Britain Hospital, 

At home, 

Private nursing, . . • 

Head nurse at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

Head nurse at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

Head nurse at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

Head nurse at Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

Assistant Supervisor at Massa- 
chusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

Nurse at Massachusetts Hospital 
for Epileptics. 



Palmer, Mass. 

52 Pearl St., Spring- 
field, Mass. 
State Farm, Mass. 

22 Kenil worth St., 

Roxbury, Mass. 
Braggville, Me. 

Boston, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

State Farm, Mass. 

Middletown, Conn. 

Georgetown, Me. 

Newburn Ave., Med- 

ford, Mass. 
Burlington, Vt. 

Middletown, Conn. 

Stamford, Conn. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

52 Pearl St., Spring- 
field, Mass. 
Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

New Britain, Conn. 

Red Point, P. E. I. 

South Portland, Me. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 

Palmer, Mass. 



Clergymen 

Rev. Father Hart. 

Rev. Father Lane. 

Rev. J. S. Lemon. 

Rev. F. S. Brewer. 

Rev. Willis A. Moore. 

Rev. C. W. Williams. 

Mrs. Addie Chase Smith. 



ETC., WHO HAVE HELD SERVICES HERE. 

Rev. Charles Olmstead. 

Rev. C. J. Sniffen. 

Rev. Franklin S. Hatch. 

Rev. Francis W. Gibbs. 

Rev. Mr. Calhoun. 

Rev. George A. Andrews. 

Rev. Abram Conklin. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 17 



Table showing Patients employed, and in What Way. 





Males. 


r 6 1113. ICS. 


Administration building, .... 


2 


4 


Bakery, ....... 


4 




Barn, ....... 


15 


_ 


Basement, ...... 


1 


_ 


Carpenter, ...... 


1 


_ 


Dining rooms, ..... 


17 


5 


Employees' cottage, .... 


2 


3 


Farm, . . . . . - 


12 




Farm group, ...... 


1 


3 


Greenhouse, ...... 


12 


_ 


Industrial building, ..... 


15 


_ 


Kitchens, ...... 


18 


29 


Laundry, ...... 


12 


58 


Lawn, ....... 


11 




Mason, ....... 


2 


_ 


Mending, .... 


_ 


5 


Music practice for assemblies, . 
Nurses' home, . - . 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


On roads, ...... 


43 


_ 


Painters, ...... 


4 


_ 


Printers, ...... 


2 




ocnool, ....... 





no 


Sewing rooms, ..... 




34 


Store, ....... 


3 




Teaching, ....... 




1 


Ward work, ...... 


100 


62 


With engineer, ..... 


2 




With yard man, ..... 


3 


r 




289 


234 



Gifts. 

Mrs. L. E. Chandler, Palmer, Christmas gifts for patients; 
Mr. D. E. Marcy, Palmer, papers and magazines; Mrs. Helen 
M. Whitman, Medford, Christmas gifts ; Miss Leary, Xhorndike, 
clothing; Mr. Louis Monto, Cambridge, clothing; Jessie Catlin, 
Palmer, rug and sofa pillow; Universalist parsonage, Palmer, 
magazines ; Mrs. George P. Mitchell, Springfield, clothing and 
desk ; Mrs. Fred Cushman, Monson, magazines and games ; 
Pev. W. H. Hart, Palmer, books and magazines ; Mrs. S. H. 
Brown, Palmer, papers ; Mrs. Helen M. Whitman, Medford, 
clothing; Miss Frances Curtis, Boston, patchwork for patient; 
Mr. George Ezekiel, Palmer, magazines ; Mrs. Laura P. Stew- 



18 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



art, Boston, shoes; Miss Harriet Gray, Wellesley Hills, shoes; 
Mr. Calvin A. Shepard, Boston, clothing and pictures. 

Amusements. 

Dances, 50 ; masquerade, 1 ; dances and whist parties for 
employees, 5 ; sessions of dancing school, 30 ; readings and im- 
personations, 5 ; musicals, 3 ; farces, 2 ; illustrated lectures, 3 ; 
entertainment, ventriloquism, 1; rides, 6; excursions to fair, 4; 
excursions to Forest Lake, 10 ; Hallowe'en party for em- 
ployees, 1. 

The hundreds of matters which have come before your Board 
during the year, to each of which was given its proper considera- 
tion, cannot be well enumerated here. The prosperity of our 
work, the contented air of our patients, and the general interest 
in accomplishing the best results to be hoped for, all indicate 
that these questions have been properly settled by your Board. 

I can only thank you as individuals and as a Board for your 
continued confidence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., 

Superintendent. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



19 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent ; in this case the approval of a judge 
is required, in addition to the physicians' certificates and the 
notification of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to 
bed early. These restrictions are not irksome when they are 
fully understood, and can be complied with easily. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
railroad, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London northern 
division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch of 
the Boston & Albany railroad has one terminus in Palmer, the 
other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, and 
the railroad fare is $1.70. 



20 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec* 



AKTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IX 
THE SEWING ROOM. 



Dresses made, . 


196 


Short nightshirts made, 


49 


Shirt waists made, 


19 


Jelly strainer made, . 


1 


Sacks made, 


2 


Nightshirts made, 


91 


Corset covers made, . 


18 


Bathing caps made, . 


20 


Petticoats made, 


61 


Laundry bags made, . 


7 


Mattress covers made, 


220 


Screens made, . 


20 


Dish towels made, 


381 


Bag for book made, . 


1 


Oven cloths made, 


48 


Bureau scarfs made, . 


50 


Roller towels made, . 


314 


Mangle aprons made, . 


6 


Trousers made, pairs, 


127 


Bibs made, 


128 


Drawers made, pairs, . 


157 


Pillow ticks made, 


119 


Table cloths made, 


116 


Clothespin bag made, 


1 


Short nightgowns made, 


65 


Overalls made, pairs, . 


13 


Curtains made, . 


7 


Chemises made, 


80 


Vests made, 


35 


Nightgowns made, 


72 


Rugs made, 


96 


Coats made, 


91 


Sash curtains made, pairs, . 


38 


Underdrawers made, pairs, . 


19 


Undershirts made, 


143 


Dusters made, . 


28 


Long curtains made, pairs, . 


10 


# Sofa pillow covers made, 


4 


Mail bags made, 


10 


Strainers made, 


4 


Napkins made, . 


472 


Strong jacket made, . 


1 


Aprons made, . 


157 


Skirts made, 


4 


Towels made, 


892 


Shirt waist suits made, 


2 


Mittens made, pairs, . 


180 


Silverware cases made, 


12 


Garters made, pairs, . 


229 


Curtains for stage made, 


3 


Shirts made, 


61 


Carpet for stage made, 


1 


Tray cloths made, 


40 


Suspenders made, pairs, 


74 


Outside shirts made, . 


6 


Jackets made, . 


12 


Curtains for bookcases made, 


6 


Tea bags made, 


14 


Holders made, . 


16 


Altar cover made, 


1 


Chair cushions made, . 


2 


Burial robes made, 


9 



1907.] PUBLIC 



DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



21 



Pillow slips made, 
Sheets made, 
Suits made, 
Sawdust bags made, . 
Rubber aprons made, 
Clothes bags made, 
Rubber pillow cases made, 
Mangle squares made, 
Mop cloths made, 
Bed ties made, . 
Barber sheets made, . 
Stand covers made, . 
Bath robe made, 
Bed socks made, pairs, 
Masks made, 
Kitchen aprons repaired, 
Overalls repaired, pairs, 
Aprons repaired, 
Coats repaired, . 
Trousers repaired, pairs, 
Drawers repaired, pairs, 
Dresses repaired, 
Nightgowns repaired, 
Petticoats repaired, . 
Sheets repaired, 
Blankets repaired, 
Bibs repaired, . 
Dresses refitted, . 



46 


TT1 q or rpnairpH 


1 


14 


rinimtpm^np^ rpn^irprl 


12 


Q 


T? n ore rpn^irpn 

-LVLl^o 1 t> Lldrll CU-y • • • 


94. 


2 




2 


2 


TYrnmpr^ ^hortPTiPrl n^ir^ 


5 


15 


Laundry bags repaired, 


12 


10 


Chemise repaired, 


1 


4 


Nightshirts repaired, 


54 


12 


Spreads repaired, 


4 


12 


Towels repaired, 


164 


4 


Skirts rpnairprl 


36 


34 


Shirt waists rpnairpd 

k . x x x x l u aiuio X V > W IX 1 X \ — t VX , . 


5 


1 


Vests repaired, 


19 


4 


Shirts rpnairpd 


157 


25 


Table cloths repaired, . 


2 


21 


Curtains rpr>airprl 


2 


55 


Garters repaired, pairs, 


12 


32 


Baseball suits repaired, 


2 


43 


Stopkiiifs rpnairprl r>airs 


3 
o 


156 


Mittens repaired, pairs, 


2 


75 


TTndprshirts rpnairprl 

vj iiu.vi oiiii lu x v^jyexxx i_y\_x, • a 


146 


41 


Underdrawers repaired, pairs, 


124 


23 


Straw tick rpnairprl 


i 


2 


Bath robe repaired, 


1 


37 


Overcoats repaired, 


4 


5U 


Jackets repaired, . , 


5 


18 
2 


Stage curtain repaired, 


1 



22 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



AETICLES MADE AND KEPAIEED IJST 
THE WARDS. 



Made. 




T "I j 

Jackets, 


6 


Aprons, 


. 302 


Sofa pillows, 


4 


Bibs, 


. 156 


Suspenders, pairs, 


3 


Coats, 


. 297 


/~\ n 

Overalls, pairs, . 


98 


Drawers, pairs, . 


. 209 


Sola pillow ticks, 


2 


Laundry bags, . 


2 


Tray cloths, 


51 


Trousers, pairs, . 


369 


-blanket, . 


1 


Shirts, 


. 391 


Stand covers, 


6 


Dresses, . 


102 


oUeets, 


12 


Children's aprons, 


24 


Sleeves, pairs, 


1 Q 

iy 


Shirt waists, 


5 


bUlt, 


1 


Underwaists, 


8 


Ventilator curtains, 


_ 1 


Cleaning cloths, 


82 


Union suit, 


1 

1 


Table cloth, 


1 


Short nightgowns, 


2o 


Dress skirt, 


1 


Napkins, . 


A1 
4o 


Clothes bags, 


40 


Chemises, . 


oy 


Vests, 


48 


Pillow covers, 


if\ 


Sack aprons, 


2 


Dish towels, 


Q7 

y / 


Pop corn bags, . 


102 


Mats, 


2 


Petticoats, 


75 


Bath towels, 


ZOO 


Night gowns, 


94 






Dusters, . 


. 124 


Repaired. 




Oven cloths, 


50 


Socks, pairs, 


. 3,608 


Undershirts, 


16 


Dress shortened, 


1 


Underdrawers, . 


31 


Shirt waists, 


10 


Nightshirts, 


66 


Skirts, 


.. 27 


Underskirts, 


15 


Aprons, 


. 132 


Mittens, pairs, . 


14 


Skirt made over, 


1 


Mattress protectors, . 


22 


Coats, 


. 162 


Towels, 


1,548 


Undershirts, 


. 256 


Shirt waist suit, . 


1 


Underdrawers, pairs, . 


. 393 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 23 



Shirts, 


413 


Drawers, pairs, . 


56 


Trousers, pairs, . 


315 


Corset covers, 


12 


Nightshirts, 


79 


Petticoats, 


25 


Bands oil dresses, 


5 


Union suit, 


1 


Overalls, pairs, . 


106 


Pillow slip, 


1 


Blouses, 


11 


Corset waist, 


1 


Vests, 


29 


Chemises, . 


13 


Overcoats, 


2 


Short nightgowns, 


24 


Dresses, 


106 


Mattress covers, 


19 


Nightgowns, 


68 


Wrappers, . 


10 


Waists, 




Dresses altered, 


2 


Clothes bags, 


5 


Jumpers, . 


20 


Necktie, . 


1 


Mittens, pairs, . 


4 


Rugs, 


4 


Dish towels, 


69 



> 



24 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN 
THE INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Men's slippers made, pairs, . 


283 


Men's shoes made, pairs, 


106 


Women's shoes made, pairs, 


73 


Rugs made, 


35 


Mattresses made, 


131 


Coat hangers made, . 


60 


Pillows made, . 


250 


Cribbage board made, 


1 


Door plates carved, . 


5 


Figures carved, . 


195 


Checker boards made, 


2 


Large envelopes for office 




made, . 


1,800 


Head marks for cemetery carved, 5 


Note heads printed, boxes, . 


11 


Envelopes printed, 


2,450 


Lectures, essays, rules, etc., 




printed, 


3,825 


Blanks printed, . 


33,140 


Postal cards printed, . 


500 


Woolen suits cut, 


26 


Trousers cut, pairs, 


22 


Woolen vests cut, 


3 


Woolen coats cut, 


5 


Denim suits cut, 


8 


Denim coats cut, 


65 


Denim trousers cut, pairs, . 


169 


Vests cut, 


80 


Summer coats cut, 


52 



Overalls cut, pairs, 


108 


Shoes repaired, pairs, 


1,344 


Shoes marked, pairs, . 


74 


Halters repaired, 


2 


Chairs reseated, 


119 


Parts of harness repaired, . 


23 


Umbrellas repaired, . 


124 


Screens repaired, 


13 


Camp stools repaired, 


2 


Belts repaired, . 


5 


Suit case repaired, 


1 


Floor pillows repaired, 


4 


Pillows renovated, 


327 


Suspenders repaired, . 


10 


Mattresses repaired, . 


60 


Saddle repaired, 


1 


Trusses repaired, 


3 


Baseball mittens repaired, . 


4 


Basket repaired, 


1 


Book repaired, . 


1 


Cushion repaired, 


1 


Stable blankets repaired, 


2 


Broom handles sandpapered, 


150 


Rugs for carriage repaired, . 


2 


Beans picked over, barrels, . 


H 


Mop repaired, . 


l 


Hair picked, rolls, 


57 


Barber chair repaired, 


1 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62, 



25 



FARM PRODUCTS. 

From Oct. 1, 1906, to Dec. 1, 1907. 



Apples, cider, 491 bushels, . . . . • . . $49 10 

Apples, crab, 21 bushels, 20 00 

Apples, eating, 321 barrels, 963 00 

Beans, field, 6 bushels, ....... 13 50 

Beans, string, 139 bushels, 139 00 

Beets, 59 bushels, . . 29 50 

Beet greens, 42 bushels, ....... 14 70 

Cabbage, 812 heads, 40 60 

Calves sold, 40, 119 50 

Carrots, 375 bushels, 225 00 

Corn, sweet, 126£ bushels, 94 87 

Cucumbers, 35 boxes, ....... 70 00 

Cucumbers, pickling, 6 bushels, ..... 9 60 

Currants, 163 quarts, ....... 17 93 

Ensilage, 200 tons, 1,000 00 

Green fodder, 90 tons, 450 00 

Green peas, 35 bushels, ....... 35 00 

Hay, 310 tons, . 5,580 00 

Hay, oat, 25 tons, ........ 450 00 

Hay, meadow, 13 tons, . . . . . . . 130 00 

Lamb, 267 pounds, 32 04 

Lettuce, 103 boxes, 77 25 

Milk, 274,094 quarts, . . . . . . . 13,704 70 

Onions, 319 bushels, 271 15 

Parsnips, 400 bushels, 300 00 

Pears, 8 bushels, 14 00 

Pork, 6,039^ pounds, 483 16 

Potatoes, 1,075 bushels, 860 00 

Pigs sold, 9, 25 00 

Pumpkins, 6,500 pounds, ...... 195 00 

Radishes, 449 dozen bunches, ...... 179 60 

Rhubarb, 2,131 pounds, . . . . . . . 42 62 

Sand sold, 125 loads, 12 50 



Amount carried forward, 



$25,648 32 



26 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

Amount brought forward, ...... $25,648 32 

Squash, summer, 40£ barrels, . ... . . . 40 25 

Squash, winter, 16f barrels, ...... 25 20 

Tomatoes, green, 16 bushels, ...... 8 00 

Tomatoes, ripe, 52 bushels, ...... 39 00 

Turnips, 20^ barrels, 25 62 

Unrendered lard, 540 pounds, ...... 48 60 

Vinegar, 2,250 gallons, 337 50 

Wood, 140 cords, " . 630 00 

Wool, 185 pounds, 46 25 



Vegetables from the Greenhouse. 



Asparagus, 2 boxes, 
Beans, shell, 3 bushels, 
Beans, string, 9 bushels 
Beet greens, 6 bushels, 
Beets, 6 bushels, . 
Cabbage, 192 heads, 
Celery, 20^ boxes, . 
Corn, 21 bushels, . 
Cucumbers, 16 boxes, 
Cucumbers for pickles, 3 pecks 
Dandelion greens, 8 bushels, 
Eggs, 267 dozen, . 
Lettuce, 816 heads, 
Onions, 2 bushels, . 
Parsnips, 4 bushels, 
Peas, 4| bushels, . 
Pumpkins, 250 pounds, 
Radishes, 4 dozen bunches, 
Strawberries, 310 quarts, 
Spinach, 3 bushels, 
Squash, summer, 2 barrels, 
Squash, winter, 2 barrels, 
Tomatoes, green, 16 bushels 
Tomatoes, ripe, 21 bushels, 



$27,137 86 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



LIST OF PEKSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 

Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Treasurer, per year, 
Clerk, per month, . 
Office assistants, (2) per month, 
Janitor, per month, 
Steward, per year, 
Supervisor (women, 2), per month, 
Assistant supervisor (woman) , per month, 
Supervisor (man), without board, per month, 
Supervisor (man), with board, per month, 
Assistant supervisors (men, 2), per month, 
Night nurses (women, 6), per month, 
Nurses (women, 25), per month, 
Night nurses (men, 8), per month, 
Nurses (men, 30), per month, . 
Engineer, per year, 
Assistant engineer, per month, 
Firemen (4), per month, 
Firemen (3), per day, 
Baker, per month, 
Kitchen man, per month, 
Store assistants (2), per month, 
Cooks (5), per month, 
Assistant cooks (10), per month, 
Table girls (4), per month, 



$3,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
600 00 
30 00 
$20 00-25 00 
18 00 
1,200 00 
$35 00-40 00 
35 00 
55 00 
40 00 
$35 00-37 00 
20 00-30 00 
20 00-30 00 
25 00-35 00 
25 00-35 00 
1,100 00 
57 17 
$23 00-30 00 
1 50 
50 00 
25 00 
$34 00-38 00 
27 00-33 00 
18 00-20 00 
18 00-20 00 



28 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [D. 



Assistant seamstresses (5), per month, . . . $16 00-18 00 
Laundress, per month, ....... 22 00 

Laundryman, per month, ...... 35 00 

Assistant laundresses (5), per month, . . . $16 00-18 00 
Farmer, per month, ....... 65 00 

Assistant farmers (18), per month, .... $23 00-35 00 

Head carpenter, per day, ...... 3 00 

Assistant carpenters (2), per day, ..... 2 50 

Painter, without board, per day, ..... 2 50 

Mason, per month, ....... 50 00 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



29 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The report of the finances of this institution for the year 
ending Nov. 30, 1907, is herewith respectfully submitted: — 



Assets. 

Real estate : — 
Cultivated land, 113 acres, 
Woodland, 21 acres, 
Pasturage, 104 acres, 
Farm (under appropriation 1901), viz.: 

Cultivated land, 40 acres, 

Woodland, 50 acres, 

Pasturage, 30 acres, 
Farm (under appropriation 1903), viz.: 

Cultivated land, 53 acres, 

Woodland, 190 acres, 

Pasturage, 57 acres, 
Water and sewerage systems, . 
Outside electric lighting (farm group). 
Quarry, . . . . 



$17,311 00 
1,465 00 
4,487 00 

1,600 00 
1,100 00 
300 00 

1,219 00 
2,850 00 
855 00 
38,947 94 
800 00 
450 00 



Buildings : — 

Original buildings, $39,620 00 

Buildings (under appropriation 1895), . 84,800 00 
Buildings (under appropriation 1899), . 86,600 00 
Nurses' home, . ) (under appropriation 
Electric building, ] 1902), . . . 26,345 00 
Boiler house (under appropriation 1900), . 5,050 00 
Laundry (under appropriation 1901), . 9,500 00 
Coal trestle for heating purposes (previ- 
ously included under building increase), 250 00 
Greenhouse and hen houses, . . . 2,600 00 



$71,384 94 



Amounts carried forward, 



$254,765 00 $71,384 94 



30 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . 


$254,765 


00 


Farm group (under appropriation 1903), viz.: 







Nos. 1 and 2, . 


27,957 


52 


No. 3, . 


6,248 


38 


Barns, ...... 


2,827 


97 


Farm cottage (under appropriation 1901), 


1,200 


00 


Vegetable cellar, ..... 


1,463 


19 


New building, men's north, 


75,000 


00 


Stone crusher (under appropriation 1906), 


2,000 


00 


New building, women's south, 


64,219 


00 


Horse stable (under appropriation 1907), . 


4,372 


76 


Personal estate : — 






Live stock, ...... 


$10,340 


00 


Produce of the farm on hand, . 


9,364 


50 


Carriages and agricultural implements, 


4,648 


02 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 


47,144 


95 


Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 


14,711 


52 


Other furniture in inmates' department, . 


27,769 


55 


Personal property of State in administra- 






tion building, ..... 


8,310 


57 


Personal property of State in employees' 






cottage, ...... 


1,634 


52 


Personal property of State in nurses' home, 


3,010 


75 


Personal property of State in farm group 






No. 3, ..... 


1,037 


95 


Personal property of State in greenhouse, . 


1,992 


45 


Ready-made clothing, .... 


2,299 


75 


Dry goods, ...... 


4,359 


58 


Provisions and groceries, 


1,805 


96 


Drugs and medicines, .... 


2,934 


39 


Instruments and laboratory fittings, 


2,530 


77 


Fuel, 


8,525 


85 


Library, ...... 


900 


00 


Other supplies undistributed, . 


6,451 


13 



440,053 82 



159,772 21 



Total, $671,210 97 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1906, $2,000 00 

Received from State on special appropriations : — 

Building, 1905, $1,749 97 

Furnishings, 1905, 649 27 



Amounts carried forward, 



$2,399 24 $2,000 00 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



31 



Amounts brought forward, . 



$2,399 24 $2,000 00 



Building and furnishings, 1906, 
Stone crusher, 1906, 
Horse stable, 1907, 
Alterations, etc., 1907, . 

Total from appropriations, 



50,799 65 
1,654 20 
4,122 76 
849 10 



59,824 95 



Received from State for maintenance, . $132,475 85 

Received from towns for support of patients, 33,850 30 
Received from individuals for support of 

patients, 7,941 23 

Received from reimbursements for sup- 
port of patients, .... 987 45 
Received from soldiers' relief for support 

of patients, . . . . . 155 53 

Received from farm and farm produce, . 186 86 

Received from store, .... 493 58 

Received from interest on bank deposit, . 159 06 

Received from sundries, . . . . 181 65 



176,431 51 



Total receipts, 



$238,256 46 



Expenditures. 



Salaries, wages and labor, 

Food : — 
Butter, 

Beans, .... 
Bread and crackers, 
Cereals, rice, meal, etc., . 
Cheese, 

Eggs, .... 
Flour, .... 
Fish, .... 
Dried and fresh fruit, 
Meats, .... 
Milk, .... 
Molasses and syrup, 
Sugar, .... 
Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, 
Vegetables, . 
Sundries, 



$5,238 44 
107 31 
340 51 
1,221 42 
115 47 
1,735 58 
3,306 12 

1.266 61 
1,013 73 
7,902 04 

14 90 
411 16 

1,757 15 
473 72 

3,729 81 

1.267 23 



$52,379 77 



29,901 20 



Amount carried forward, 



$82,280 97 



32 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 



$82,280 97 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, 
Furnishing goods, .... 
Hats and caps, .... 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, ..... 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 
Brushes, brooms, etc., 
Carpets, rugs, etc., 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 
Furniture and upholstery, 
Kitchen furnishings, 
Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, .... 

Heat, light and power : — 
Coal, ..... 
Gas, . .... 

Oil, 

Sundries, .... 



Repairs and improvements : 
Brick, .... 
Cement, lime and plaster, 
Door sashes, etc., . 
Electrical work and supplies, 
Hardware, iron, steel, etc., 
Lumber, 
Machinery, etc., 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 
Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll). 
Sundries, ..... 

Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc., . 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, express and transportation, 



$693 66 
551 14 
1,481 40 
290 36 
81 25 
484 72 
15 08 



$2,052 72 
393 61 
525 70 
739 52 
448 40 
428 49 
100 63 
411 11 



$11,178 41 
66 86 
332 23 
116 47 



$69 00 
1,245 23 
34 50 

596 72 

300 66 
1,145 10 

246 71 
1,508 96 
2,737 18 
1,407 84 

222 08 



$226 06 
960 47 
814 08 



3,597 61 



5,100 18 



11,693 97 



9,513 98 



Amounts carried forward, 



$2,000 61 $112,186 71 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



33 



Amounts brought forward, 



$2,000 61 $112,186 71 



Funeral expenses, .... 

Gratuities, ..... 

Hose, ...... 

Labor (not on pay roll), . 
Medicines and hospital supplies, 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), 
Postage, ..... 

Printing and printing supplies, 
Return of runaways, 
Soap and laundry supplies, 
Stationery and office supplies, 
School books and school supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Tobacco, 

Water, .... 
Sundries, 
Annual report, 



129 50 
83 16 
58 00 
280 71 
1,999 40 
52 00 
334 84 
63 26 
31 94 
503 32 
439 79 
1 58 
462 87 
197 23 
590 57 
967 91 
978 28 
167 33 



9,342 30 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . 
Hay, grain, etc., 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Horses, 

Other live stock, 
Labor (not on pay roll), 
Rent, . 

Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Sundries, 



Total expense for maintenance, . 
Other expenses on special appropriations, 
Paid State Treasurer, 
Refunded to towns, 
Refunded to individuals, 
Sundry payments, .... 

Total expenditures, . 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1907, . 



$302 62 
341 02 
461 96 

4,451 05 
345 85 
235 00 
19 00 
962 38 
115 00 
932 36 
780 60 



8,946 84 

$130,475 85 

59,824 95 

43,809 22 

42 71 

101 93 

1 80 

$234,256 46 

4,000 00 



$238,256 46 



34 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Resources. 

Cash on hand, $4,000 00 

Balance of maintenance with State Treas- 
urer, 7,304 74 

Bills receivable for board, . . . 13,711 19 

Other bills receivable, .... 17 78 

Unexpended special appropriations, . 22,922 58 



Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, $4,901 92 

Maintenance bills, ..... 6,305 49 

Special appropriation bills, . . . 2,151 72 



$47,956 29 



13,359 13 



Resources over liabilities, ...... $34,597 16 



Statement of Appropriations. 





Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
Last 
Twelve 
Months. 


Balance. 


Building, 1905 


$75,000 00 


$73,250 03 


$1,749 97 






5,000 00 


4,350 73 


649 27 




Building and furnishings, 1906, 


80,000 00 


11,805 91 


50,799 65 


$17,394 44 


Alterations, etc., 1907, .... 


3,400 00 




849 10 


2,550 90 


Constructing silos, 1907, 


1,100 00 






1,100 00 


Horse stable, 1907 


6,000 00 




4,122 76 


1,877 24 


Stone crusher, 1906, .... 


2,000 00 


345 80 


1,654 20 






$172,500 00 


$89,752 47 


$59,824 95 


$22,922 58 



Nurses' Training School Fund. 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1906, $163 32 

Twelve months' receipts, ...... 655 03 



$818 35 

Twelve months' payments, ...... 599 00 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1907, 



$219 35 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



35 



Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, . $179 63 

Cash in safe, at hospital, ....... 39 72 

$219 35 

Patients' Money. 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1906, $538 10 

Twelve months' receipts, ...... 1,714 76 



$2,252 86 

Twelve months' payments, 1,482 22 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1907, $770 64 

Investment. 

Palmer Savings Bank, ....... $556 00 

Palmer National Bank, 178 14 

Cash in safe at hospital, ........ 36 50 

$770 64 

Eespectfullv submitted, 

WALTEK E. HATCH, 

Treasurer. 

Dec. 2, 1907. 

This certifies that I have compared the treasurer's report for the year ending 
Nov. 30, 1907, with the books kept at the institution, and find them to agree. 
The cash account shows a balance in the treasurer's hands of 84,000, as follows: — 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, . . . $2,553 73 
Cash vouchers, etc., not entered, . . . 1,248 41 

Cash in safe at hospital, ..... 197 86 

S4,000 00 



Dec. 14, 1907. 



GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Auditor. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



40 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



t-h (M CO i-l 
CO 1-1 



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"tf I>- CM i-H 
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1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



Totals. 


totals. 




cc-h — 1 lO CM 


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CO 


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CM rHt»HHN!OXNNrHIN | T-* CM -*l 

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Sane. 


TOTALS. 


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Insane. 


TOTALS. 


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Massachusetts, ..... 

Other New England States, . 

Other States, ..... 

Total native, .... 

Other countries: — 
Austria, ...... 

Canada, ...... 

Cape Verde Island, .... 

Denmark, ...... 

England, ...... 

Germany, ...... 

Ireland, ...... 

Italy, . 

New Brunswick, ..... 
Norway, . 

Nova Scotia, ..... 

Poland, Russia, ..... 

Prince Edward Island, .... 

Quebec, ...... 

Russia, ...... 

Scotland, ...... 

Sweden, ...... 

Total foreign, .... 
Unknown, ...... 

Totals, . . . . 



42 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





r IRST 
Any 


ADMITTED TO 

Hospital. 


Other Admissions. 


Totals 




PLACLs. 




JS 






i 






j 






i 




JB 


J 










— 




3 


1 






i 


1 


J 

"oS 


§ 










e2 















A. — Insane: — 




















Berkshire County, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Bristol County, 




















Essex County, 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Franklin County, . 




















Hampden County, 


2 




2 


- 






2 




2 


Middlesex County, 


2 




3 




1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


Norfolk County, 




1 


1 


_ 








1 


1 


Plymouth County, 




















Suffolk County, 


5 


8 


13 


2 


1 


3 


7 


9 


16 


Worcester County, 


14 


10 


24 


1 






15 


10 


25 


Totals, . 


23 


22 


45 


3 


2 


5 


26 


24 


50 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or 




















over), ..... 


8 


12 


20 


2 


2 


4 


10 


14 


24 


Country districts (under 10,000), 


15 


9 


91 


1 


1 


2 


16 


10 


26 


B. — Sane: — 




















Berkshire County, 


2 


1 


3 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


Bristol County, 


1 






1 




1 


2 




2 


Essex County, 


5 


4 


9 


2 


: 


2 


7 


4 


11 


Franklin County, . 




2 


2 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


Hampden County, 


5 


3 


8 








5 


3 


8 


Middlesex County, 


7 


9 


16 


4 


2 


6 


11 


11 


22 


Norfolk County, . 


2 


2 


4 








2 


2 


4 


Plymouth County, 


2 




2 








2 




2 


Suffolk County, . 


14 


12 


2d 


5 


2 


7 


19 


14 


33 


Worcester County, 


6 


2 


8 






1 


7 


2 




Totals, . 


44 


35 


79 


14 


5 


19 


58 


40 


98 1 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or 




















over), ..... 


36 


27 


63 


11 


3 


14 


47 


30 


77 


Country districts (under 10.000), 


8 


8 


16 


3 


2 


5 


11 


10 


21 



One female admitted as sane, and readmitted as insane for the first time, during the year. 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 







Insane 




Sane. 


Totals 








3 






g 






CJ 














3 




J 


"oS 






g 


1 












S 


I 




S3 










"S 


a 






Unmarried, . 


20 


17 




36 


24 


60 


56 


41 


' 97 


Married, ..... 


1 


4 




6 


7 


13 
6 


7 


11 


18 


Widowed, .... 


2 


1 


3 


2 


4 


4 


5 


9 










































Totals 


23 


22 


45 


44 


35 


79 


67 


57 


124 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 43 

6. — Occupations of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



MALES. 





o 
a 
a 

on 




1 




o 

a 
1 


■ 

I 

& 


"3 






yi 






= 


=2 


Carpenter, 




1 
1 


1 


Office boy, 




i 
i 


i 
1 


Clerks, . 


1 


2 


3 


Paper maker, 


— 


1 


1 


Conductor, . 






1 


Scholars, 




3 


3 


Engineer, 






1 


Shoemakers, . 




2 


2 


Farmers, 






2 


Solicitor, 




1 


1 


Hostler, 






1 


Traveling salesman, 




1 


1 


Laborers, 


1 




8 


Waiter, 


1 




1 


Machinist, 


1 




1 


Xo occupation, 


19 


18 


37 


Mattress maker, 






1 




















Mechanic, 






1 


Totals, . 


23 


44 


67 



FEMALES. 



Bookkeeper, . 




1 


1 


Scholar, 




1 


1 


Cook, . 




1 


1 


Waitress, 




1 


1 


Domestics, 


1 


8 


9 


No occupation, 


19 


18 


37 


Housekeeper, 




1 


1 


















Housewives, . 


2 


3 


5 


Totals, . 


22 


35 


57 


Mill operative, 




1 


1 









WIFE OR DAUGHTER OF 



Barber, 


1 




1 


Operatives, . 


1 


1 


2 


Butcher, 


1 




1 


Painter, 


1 




1 


Carpenters, . 




2 


2 


Plumber, 


1 




1 


Cattle dealer, 






1 


Shoemakers, . 


1 


1 


2 


Coal dealer, . 






1 


Tailor, . 




1 


1 


Farmers, 






3 


Teamster, 




1 


1 


Laborers, 


2 




9 


Ticket agent, 




1 


1 


Life saver, 






1 


Tinsmith, 


1 




1 


Liquor dealer, 






1 


Unknown, 


13 


12 


25 


Marble cutter, 






1 






















Mechanic, 






1 


Totals, . : 


22 


36 


58 


Night watchman, . 






1 









HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



Died. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 


•si^ox j 1 1 ^»«^-««*« i i 


t— i 


17 

35.88 




| 1 HHHH | 1 HH 1 1 


CO 1 


CO 

CO ® 
CO 
CO 




1 1 1 "5--"-"-"^ 1 1 


3 ' 


11 

35.45 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 


•SIBIOT, 


1 OWH 1 H ! 1 <M 1 1 1 


t- 1 


17 
17.79 




1 -*H I M 1 Ml I I 


CO 1 


CO °. 




1 lOCOH 1 1—1 1 1 H I 1 1 


H ' 


11 

18.18 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF INSANITY. 


■q«»ox 


1 h lO CO CM <N I H (M H | | 


t— 1 


17 

27.64 




| H H H H | | HH | | | 


CO 1 


00 

CO *1 

3 




1 1 ^CMHCM 1 1 HH | | 


- 1 1 


11 

26.81 


First admitted to Ant Hospital. 


WHEN ADMITTED. 




1 0»®10lOMMrtN | H | 


lO 1 

•f 


45 

20.83 




I ^WrHlCMN 1 <M 1 1 1 


CM 1 
CM 


22 
23.40 




1 CMCO-* | HHH | | H | 


CO 1 
CM 


23 
18.36 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 


•si^ox 


IflCOlOWW | HHH | H | 
CM 


CO CM 


45 
14.47 


•S9lBni3jJ 


H ®" NH 1 ' -tTHT - 1 1 1 1 




22 
17.37 




■*»"*<HHCM 1 1 1 1 1 H | 


CO 1 
CM 


23 
11.95 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF INSANITY. 


•si«lox 


1 OtCiOiOMCOrtN | h | 


"5 1 


45 
20.83 




1 t^COHiOCMCM 1 CM 1 1 1 


CM 1 


22 
23.40 




I (NCC-H | HHH | | H | 


CO 1 
CM 


23 
18.36 


AGES. 


Congenital, ....... 

15 years and less, ..... 

From 15 to 20 years, ..... 

20 to 25 years 

25 to 30 years, ..... 

30 to 35 years, ..... 

35 to 40 years, ..... 

40 to 50 years, ..... 

50 to 60 years, ..... 

60 to 70 years 

70 to 80 years 

80 to 90 years 

Totals, ' . 

Unknown, ....... 

Total persons, ..... 

Mean known ages, 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



»-h (N cn re cn cnj cnj I cm* 



CO <M 



" £:9 I' e K 



KM I t-Ii-i I (Mi 



I 00 CO CO 00 5© CO < 



CO<OOOCOCOCO-*f^Hi-( 



00<MiOOO I (ONNi 



•sqT^ox 



i-H as ■«*< co co i i nh i i i 



X X X X X X X X X X 

riricjcirtcirtcjciri 



OiOOiSOOOOOO 



^-flooocoo 



Sis 



5| 



46 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



8. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 















Predispos 


ng Causes 








Admitted. 


HEREDITARY 


NEUROTIC 


ALCOHOLIC 










TENDENCY. 


TENDENCY. 


TENDENCY. 






























J 




3 


a 


■j 
3 


£ 


J 

3 






J 






*e3 


a 






£ 


"3 


E 




8 
A 


£ 






S 






1 




<= 




9 


o 




fee 




Insane. 


























Physical : — 


























Alcoholism, 




1 


1 




















Cerebral hemor- 


























rhage, . 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 














Dentition, 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 














Head injury, . 


2 


1 


3 




















T*rJmpnf»AT~*Vi n li ti q 




1 


1 




















Rachitis, 


1 


- 


1 




















Scarlet fever and 


























phrnnip rnn- 


























ning ears, 


— 


1 


1 




















Whooping cough, 


1 


— 


1 




















Totals, 


6 


6 


12 


1 


1 


2 















Unknown, . 


17 




oo 


3 


3 


6 














Totals, 


23 


22 


45 


4 


4 


8 
















Sane. 


























Physical : — 


























Alcoholism, 


1 


1 


2 














1 


1 


2 


Cerebral hemor- 


























rhage, . 


- 


2 


2 




















Chronic running 


























ears, 


1 


* 


1 




















Dentition, 


1 


— 


1 


1 




1 














Head injury, . 


3 


- 






















Indigestion, 
Kidney disease, 




1 






















1 
























Malaria, . 


1 


_ 




1 




1 














Meningitis, 
Overstudy, 


- 


1 


1 






















1 


I 




















v/ v ci \\ yji jv, 


1 






1 




1 














Poliomyelitis, . 


- 


1 


1 




















Sunstroke, 


1 




J 


1 


_ 


1 














kj^y jL/iiiiioj . . 


1 






1 




1 














Mental : — 


























Fright, . 




1 


1 




















Totals, 


11 


8 


19 


5 




5 


1 




1 


1 


~2~ 


Unknown, . 


33 


27 


60 


9 


11 


20 












Totals, 


44 


35 


79 


14 


11 


25 








1 


1 


2 


Aggregates, . 


17 


14 


31 


6 


1 


7 








1 


1 


2 


Unknown, . 


50 


43 


93 


12 


14 


26 












Aggregates, . 


67 


57 


124 


18 


15 


33 






- 1 


1 


1 


~2 



1907. J 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



1-1 I I I TJH Ci i-h rH co o 
i-i rH iM CO W 



(Ml I I INhlOOXC 



CI I I I NOCCHLCO 



CO 







Totals. 


O 1 


1 hiOC(N»Ch 


CD CO 
t> 


Ci 
l> 


15.82 


SANE. 


OD 

SI 
- 

s 

H 


8 
a 






CO CM 
CO 


iO 
CO 


17.05 






Males. 


IO 1 


1 1 Tt< ^ CM 
H i— 1 


CO i—i 




14.87 



iO I I I CO tJh LO Ci X Ci 



i— 1 I I I i-i I CO iC Ttn CO 



CO CM 



O CM 

CM 



^ I I I C^rfM^^W COI CO 
CM CM 



I »Q I I I I I I I I 



I CM I I I I I I I I 
CM 



LO 1 



CM I 
CM 



I CO I I I I I I I I CO I 
CM CM 



00 

. CO 

£ 

.2 

of of of 

. , +) -P +J K K IB 83 S 

S3 S S H H H H * • 3 

O O C ^ 03 ^ 53 " 

J BEE ^>>>>>, p , g 

• CCOCOCMCMiCOoS • £ 

-3SOOOOOOO& -3 d r§ ^ 

c'TiHMOHN^oS eg O §0 

g|J § J § 
OPS O P 



48 



HOSPITAL FOR 



EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 







IM »OH 
CM 


GO GO 
CM CM 




GO O CM H 
CO 




CO 
CO 


rOTALS, 


•sajsraaj 


GO 1 1 


GO GO 


CM 


O CM 1 »— i 

CO 


CO CO 
CO CO 


OS 
CM 








o o 

CM CM 


(—1 
1— 1 


GO ^ CM 1 


^ t£ 


CO 






CO 1 

l— 1 


t>» I> 

r-l i—l 


CO 


CO i— 1 1 1 
1—1 


t— ( i—l 


CO 

1—1 


Died. 


'S9IBUI3J 


CO 1 1 


CO CO 




GO 1 1 1 


GO GO 


CO 






GO CO 1 


i—l l—l 
i— 1 i-H 




GO iH I I 


OS OS 


GO 


Q 

g 




1 1 1 


II 1 OH | H 
i-H 


CM CM 
i—i i—l 


o 

i-H 


IMPRO 




1 1 1 


II 1 NH | H 




CM 


Not 


• S9 I*TC 


1 1 1 


II 1 00 1 1 1 


GO GO 


GO 


a 




CO (N H 


1—1 T— 1 

i-i i— 1 


CO 


CM CM CM 1 


CO CO 




m 
> 
o 

B5 

s 




CM 1 1 


CM CM 




O i-h | | 

CM 


CM CM 


OS 






CO CM r— ( 


OS OS 


to 


CM i— i CM 1 
CM 


CM CM 


T— * 

CM 






1 1 1 


II 1 1 CM 1 1 


CM CM 1 


3 » 


•saprcnaj 


1 1 1 


II J 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 






1 1 1 


II 1 1 CM 1 1 


CM CM 1 



•si«»ox 



I I 



I I 



I I 



I I 



if 1 1 

- ~ ^ o 



fa <X! H 



co O 
CD CO 
CO £h 

o3 © 

C Oh 

73 "el 

-4-3 -1-3 
O O 



33 

'a, 

CO 

O 

>> 
S3 
c3 



OS 



CO 

•- 

fa 



^ a3_T o3 



o9 



x 



_ O 
O J3 

CO 



■as & 

co ^3 .22 ,d 
,3 
O O 


b' x p fa g 

8^3 o 
dfa^Hfa 

03 

go 



CP O 

Ph. 

CP 

CP 



03 
~ C3 
co O 
CP co 

CO Si 

c3 CP 
cp P_ 

73 73 

-1-3 +3 

o o 



I 

pq 



o3 

-1-3 

CO 

O 
^3 

I 



fa 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. (32. 49 

11. — Causes of Death. 



Insane. Sane. Totals. 



CAUSES. 


£ 
1 


m 

0) 

a 

a 


Totals. 


J 
si 


Females. 


Totals. 


£ 


Females. 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 




















Central neuritis, 


l 


- 


1 


1 




1 


2 




2 


Cerebral hemorrhage, 


- 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Epileptic convulsion, 


l 




1 


- 






1 




1 


Epilepsy, 


l 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 


3 


3 


6 


Exhaustion, . 




— 




1 




1 


1 




1 


Exhaustion from epilepsy, 


l 




1 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


General paresis, 


l 




1 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Status epilepticus, . 


5 


1 


6 


2 


1 


3 


7 


2 


9 


Tubercular meningitis, . 






- 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Respiratory system : — 




















Acute miliary tuberculosis, 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Lobar pneumonia, . 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


4 


Pulmonary thrombosis, . 


- 




' - 




1 


1 




1 


1 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Circulatory system: — 




















Dilation of heart due to 

chronic endocarditis. 
Senile gangrene of the foot, 


- 


- 




1 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


General : — 




















Asphyxia, 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Totals, 


11 


6 


17 


9 


8 


17 


20 ! 


14 


34 



50 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 





z 

O S J « 

§ ° 3 s 


•si^ox 


. 1 I 


I I ih cm 


"* 






a 1 


3 


98.36 








, , , 


1 1 1 CM 


cm 






- '1 


*rs 


00 

CO 


Z 


gftaj 










CO 




CO 1 


CO 


CO 
CM 


DQ 






- 6I«*0X 








CO 








CM 
CO 
CM 


s 

o 
-< 


o 

o 
5 


s 

- 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 "S 1 


1 


lO 




THER 


S 

^ « 
z | 
















CO 1 


CO 


CM 

§ 

CO 


O 
■J 


o 2 

Zq 












m 
o> 


<! 


s ° 

o 
» 


2 
•< 






1 1 1 CI 


CM 






" 1 




us 

§8 






ca 
z 








CM 


CO 




CO 1 


CO 


CO 
CO 

© 




M 

5 












lO 




CO 1 


CO 


CO 
CO 




& 


CQ 

ft. 
w 
j 


•S9JBXH9 j 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <-l 


, 




s§ 

CM 




o 

z 
o 


w 




1 1 1 1 1 1 I I »o 1 


iO 1 


*n 


00 




o 

a 


| 






1 I 1 CO 


CM 






CO 1 


CO 


■ 


SPIT 


j 
o 
m 


5 
•< 

00 






- 1 




CM 


o 
a 








1 1 1 CM 


CM 










CM 
lO 


t» 
<; 




a 






life* 


CO 






CO 1 


CO 


22 
o 

a 

33 


o 

H 

o 


| 

o 


y 

E 
H 

a 










CM 


FIRST ADMITTE 










CO 






o 1 


LO 


CM 
CO 


z 
o 




"SJB^OX 




l l l I 








CO 1 


CD 


to 

CO 


1 

a 
a 


- 

s 






-H 1 




00 




Ed 

3 
o 
fa 
w 












CO 








CO 

iO 
CM 




a 

z 
a 


£ 


•si«;ox 


1 CO 1 




1 






lco , 

1 


1- 






H 

-«! 
OS 

§ 


2 
•< 


•S3|Bta3j 


h 1-1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 






>o 




P 


2 




r to i i i i ' t f i i 


lO 1 







■a s 



c 


c 


£ 


S 


2 
i 


2 


o 
S 


OUI 


CO 

>> 


V 

>> 


co 
>> 


eJ 
co 
>» 


co 


Cm 


CM 


iO 


o 


O 

M 


o 





o 


o 


o 


O 


CO 


CO 




CM 




O 



+3 > ©.u 

& < 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



. . 1 1 . . . .H . » 




rt g 







1 ' 


1 II 1 1 11-11 


- . 


rH O 


I ........ - 


rH 1 


1 






I I 






00 
CO 


.......... 




1 1 








1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






. . i . . I v* e* t*» 


-«*< CM 


16 

181.14 


1 I 1 1 . 1 i-H CM i-H CO 




8 

194.42 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO —I 


t~ rH 


8 

164.76 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 




. 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 






t I- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 




1 rH I CO CM CO CO | | 


CD 1 


16 

35.56 


1 H 1 CO | ^ rH CM 1 1 


BO 1 


m 

00 t- 

CO 


1 I . . CM CM CM CM 1 1 


OO 1 


O0 CO 

OS 

CO 


CM 1 1 1 1 1 CM CM 


CM 


CO CO 
rH 00 


rH ..III. CM . CM 


t>- rH 


8 

174.57 


^H 1 1 1 1 1 CM CM CM CM 




198.85 


1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 


, , 


i i 


1 1 1-1 1 . 1 1 II 


1 I 




. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


I I 




Congenital, 
Under 1 month, 
From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 

5 to 10 years, . 
10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, .... 
Totals, 

Unknown, .... 

Totals, .... 

Average of known cases (in 
months), .... 



Public Document No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Hospital for Epileptics 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 



Year ending November 30, 1908. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Squabe. 
1909. 



Public Document 



No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

M A SSACHUSETTS : V>W«*. 

Hospital for Epileptics PJ> 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1908. 




fa BOSTON: 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 

1909. 

C 
K 



1921 



STATE HCUSt, *** 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



3 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, .......... 5 

Trustees' Report, . " . . . . . . . . .7 

Superintendent's Report, . . . . . . . . .11 

General Information, . . . . . . ... .20 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room, .... 21 

Articles repaired on the Ward, ....... 23 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Room, ... 24 
Farm Products, ........... 25 

List of Persons regularly employed, ...... 27 

Treasurer's Report, .......... 29 

Statistical Tables, .......... 37 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Hospital foe Epileptics. 



TRUSTEES. 
WILLIAM N. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, 
MABEL W. STEDMAX, Secretary, 
HEXRY P. JAQUES, M.D., . 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D., 
WIXFORD X. CALDWELL, . 
MARY P. TOWXSLEY, 
JOHX BAPST BLAKE, M.D., 



Bostox. 

Brooextxe. 

Lexox. 

Daltox. 

Sprixgfield. 

Sprixgfield. 

Bostox. 



EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., 
MORGAX B. HODSKIXS, M.D., 
EDWARD A. KEXXEDY, M.D., 
ALDEX V. COOPER, M.D., . 
MELYIX E. COWEX, M.D., . 
EDITH E. SMITH, 
CHARLES F. SIMOXDS, 
GEORGE E. BATES, . 
GEORGE H. GALLUP, . 



OFFICERS. 

Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assista7it Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
. Clerk. 

Steward and Storekeeper. 

Engineer. 

Farmer. 



WALTER E. HATCH, Clerk and Treasurer. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

Dr. E. G. BRACKETT, Considting Orthopedic Surgeon. 



Stye Commontoealtl) of itlasoacljusetts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for EpilejDtics at 
Monson respectfully submit the following report. 

The Board feel that both they and the hospital have under- 
gone a serious loss in the death of Mr. Clough, who had been 
a trustee since the establishment of the hospital. He had de- 
voted his time and energy for many years to the benefit of this 
institution and its inmates. He was most conscientious and 
careful in his attention to all questions relating to the policy 
and administration of the hospital and to the care and comfort 
of the patients, and the Board was accustomed to rely much 
upon his wisdom and judgment. He died at Pinehurst, C., 
Feb. 8, 1908. 

The trustees have named the new men's building the Clough 
building, in his memory. 

In July the Governor appointed Dr. John Bapst Blake of 
Boston in the place of Mr. Clough, and reappointed Dr. H. 
P. Jaques, whose term of office had expired. These appoint- 
ments were confirmed by the Council. 

There has been no change in the medical staff of the hospital 
during the past year. It has long been the desire of the Board 
to appoint an assistant physician who should devote himself 
wholly to research and investigation into the cause of epilepsy, 
the best methods for its treatment and cure and such other 
cognate subjects as may seem most likely to develop our prac- 
tical knowledge of this disease. During the past year we have 
devoted much consideration to this subject, and it is hoped 
that the right person for this position has now been found. 



8 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



The appropriations for last year amounted to $13,000, ap- 
portioned as follows : — 



Construction and furnishing building for male employees, . $5,900 00 

Bread oven, 1,500 00 

Ensilage cutter and motor and instalment, .... 850 00 

Removal of stable, 500 00 

Renewal of pipes in administration building, .... 350 00 
Completion and furnishing of rooms in the women's south 

building, 3,900 00 



$13,000 00 



The new building for male employees has been placed on the 
west side of the road from Palmer to the hospital, nearly op- 
posite the old house, now used for the farmers. This building- 
is now nearly completed. The laying of the water and sewerage 
pipes and their connection with the main pipes and drain, re- 
spectively, has been accomplished largely through the work of 
the patients. The building seems satisfactory, and will much 
relieve our difficulties in regard to the arrangements for em- 
ployees. 

The stable has been removed and placed on an excellent stone 
foundation with a good cellar. We have ample place here for 
the storage of supplies and a fine root storage cellar. 

Erom the old material from some of the sheds which were 
pulled down we have made a new tool house and a new green- 
house. 

The bread oven has been completed and is now in use. Ar- 
rangements are under way for installing the ensilage cutter. 
The renewal of the pipes in the administration building will 
be undertaken as soon as is possible without disturbing the 
work now being done there. 

In regard to the completion and furnishing of the rooms on 
the ground floor of the women's south building the trustees have 
delayed action. While on the whole it seems advisable that 
this should be undertaken, certain new considerations have 
arisen which demand time and thought. A definite conclu- 
sion in regard to this matter will be shortly reached and duly 
reported. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



The appropriations asked for for the coming year are : — 

For the construction and furnishing of two buildings for 
children in a portion of the estate somewhat separated 
from the main group of buildings for the adults; for 
the construction and furnishing of a building for the 
administration work of this group and for employees; 
for the kitchen and heating plant ; for the proper laying 
and connection of the water pipes from these buildings 
with the present mains, and for the proper laying and 
connection of the sewerage pipes, $125,000 00 

For the reconstruction and relocation of the cow barn 

and hay barn, 8,000 00 

Since the lowering of the age limit for the admission of 
patients, and since the removal of the restriction on the recep- 
tion of the feeble-minded by the Legislature, we have received 
and we are liable to receive children whom it is not advisable 
to place with the adults, and for whom some separate provision 
must be made. The separation of epileptic children from the 
adult epileptic patients is necessary (1) for the safety of the 
children; (2) for their moral welfare; (3) in order that they 
may be placed under the most favorable conditions for improve- 
ment and cure. It would seem scarcely necessary to enter more 
fully into these considerations as we believe that they will be 
readily accepted. 

The trustees have fixed upon a suitable portion of the hos- 
pital estate, sufficiently separated from the main group of 
buildings, in which the adults are cared for, as the future sit- 
uation of the buildings for the children. It is on the easterly 
slope of one of the hills, and there is close by an excellent 
playground for the children in the woods above. The impor- 
tance of proper provision for these children cannot too strongly 
be stated. 

The trustees have again requested a proper sum, $8,000, for 
the reconstruction and relocation of the hay barn and the cow 
barn. We believe that this will be a matter of economy for 
the institution and that provision should now be made for this 
purpose. 

The trustees still feel that the more interest that is taken 
in its work by the general medical profession of the State the 



10 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



farther will its influence extend and the greater will be its 
value to the people. We have therefore encouraged the super- 
intendent to take advantage of all proper opportunities to excite 
the interest of the outside physicians. A plan has been pro- 
posed for holding a clinic at the hospital, to be attended by such 
physicians as may be interested, and this will probably before 
long be started. 

The trustees feel that during the coming year the hospital 
should advance in two directions: first, in regard to the pro- 
vision for children ; this is of extreme importance, both for 
the patients and for the proper management of the institution: 
secondly, some definite action should be taken as regards 
research work. 

WILLIAM K BULLAED, M.D., Chairman. 
MABEL W. STEDMAN, Secretary. 
HENRY P. JACQUES, M.D. 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D. 
WINFORD K CALDWELL. 
MARY P. TO WESLEY. 
JOHN BAPST BLAKE, M.D. 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 11 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The following report is respectfully presented. 

The use of the appropriations granted last year has been 
well studied by your Board, but I wish to call attention, in par- 
ticular, to the value of the building for male employees, which 
is now nearly completed. This work was kept out of the hands 
of the contractors because it was rather a small undertaking 
and because the bids obtained ran rather higher than the esti- 
mates originally furnished. 

The foundation was let out to contract at a reasonable price. 
As the building is located on a side hill there was very little 
excavating to do, and our boys attended to the greater part of 
it. They also did the main share of the excavating for the 
water main and sewer pipe, — a distance of 400 feet. There 
was no expense to the hospital in that portion of the work 
except the value of the water main and sewer pipe and the 
hired labor, of putting these in, which were all counted in the 
appropriation for the building. Two carpenters were employed 
during August and September, and three during October and 
a part of November. One patient who had been a carpenter 
before coming here worked with these hired men. The result 
has been that every portion of the work has been thoroughly 
done, and the building represents the most careful workman- 
ship, so that it will be an especially durable building and should 
not require any repairs for many years. It is now completed, 
with the exception of the inside finishing and plastering. The 
heating system and plumbing are either all in or provided for, 
and the appropriation is adequate for properly finishing all 
this work and furnishing the building. The grading has been 
carried on in connection with the trenching, by our boys, so that 
in the spring the work can be properly finished without expense. 



12 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



This building was designed to accommodate a married 
couple, one or both of whom would be employed by the hospital. 
The woman would be held responsible for the care of all the 
rooms in the building and possibly for the rooms in another 
building for employees not far away. She would be able to 
accommodate six or eight lodgers, who would be employees of 
the institution, and she would be responsible for the proper 
conduct of her lodgers. In this way we hope to take good care 
of some of our attendants and at the same time furnish a solu- 
tion of the rather difficult problem of providing for married 
people. 

If this matter works out as it now promises, it will certainly 
be desirable to duplicate this building as soon as we can get the 
appropriation for the work. I have not, however, recommended 
that we ask for such an appropriation this year, because it is not 
now an especially pressing need, and the work we have in view 
in connection with the children's colony is of such very great 
importance that it may well be made the sole object of our 
efforts for the year. 

In the matter of the use of the appropriation for finishing 
and furnishing the space on the ground floor of our women's 
south building, which was originally designed for the accom- 
modation of female employees, I have asked your permission 
to delay the expenditure of this sum until we could fully de- 
termine the particular value of the very promising method of 
taking care of employees in such a house as we have just built. 

Another reason for delaying the use of this appropriation is 
that the space originally intended for cutting up into rooms has 
been used temporarily as an industrial room, and it has become 
practically indispensable. It is excellently adapted for these 
necessary purposes, and I am in hopes that it will seem advis- 
able to your Board to retain it for this purpose, and at a later 
date to obtain a slight addition to the appropriation now on 
hand, so that we may erect a separate building for female em- 
ployees similar to the one for male employees, but suitably 
located, so that these women will be convenient to their work, 
and somewhat associated with the group of women patients. 

Several changes have been made in the assembly hall, in 
accordance with the advice of the State police, and a portable 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



booth for the exhibition of moving pictures has been built 
there under their direction. 

Among the repairs, the most useful has been the reconstruc- 
tion, in stone and cement, of the wooden porch at the kitchen 
building. 

Many other important repairs have been made, and in gen- 
eral the expense for such work seems larger than necessary, 
unless all the conditions are well understood. The institution, 
though new, is built on the site of an old one, and during the 
year much of the repairing done has been renewing or re- 
building the walls of important springs long since going to 
ruin, cleaning out an ancient reservoir, rebuilding some walls 
to keep in commission a very useful but very old source of 
water, digging up and renewing fallen-in drains of large size 
with heavy nag tops — expensive work, but cheaper and better 
than letting them go to decay and putting in some other kind 
of drains and other such work. 

Though there will always be repairing to do, these special 
things are now so well done that they will last for a generation, 
and thus prove the benefit and real economy of the work. 



Number of patients admitted during the year by commitment, . 229 

Number of patients admitted during the year by transfer, . . 2 

Number of patients admitted during the year from escape, . . 5 

Number of patients admitted during the year from visit, . . 46 



Total number of patients admitted, 282 

Number of patients died during the year, 47 

Number of patients otherwise dismissed, 179 

Total number of cases treated, 852 



Admissions and transfers have occurred so that our number 
of patients has been a little larger than was estimated. The 
rooms are now fully occupied and need of more space is already 
felt. 

A fire-alarm box has been installed, connecting us with the 
department in Palmer. 

A capable instructor in calisthenics has been employed ; there 
are two classes held on Saturday afternoons. These are fol- 
lowed, during cool weather, by the dancing school, where the 



14 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



younger persons and those not considered suitable to go to the 
evening dances are entertained. In warm weather baseball and 
out-of-door games are substituted for the in-door amusement. 

Safeguarding of the machinery has been perfected and meets 
with the approval of the State police. 

Moving pictures of a few cases during attacks, patients at 
work, a group of feeble-minded (to illustrate the movements of 
this class of persons), gaits of a few types of nervous disease, 
etc., have been made and were exhibited at the meeting of the 
National Association for the Study of Epilepsy, in Indianapolis. 
Further work in this line is under way. 

A plan for holding a clinic at this hospital, to which mem- 
bers of the medical profession are to be invited, has been well 
advanced, and, except for necessary delay, would have been 
in operation. This no doubt will be fully arranged within a 
reasonable time. 



Table showing Patients employed, and in What Way. 





Men. 


Women. 


Administration building, .... 


1 


4 


Bakery, ....... 


5 




Barn, ....... 


13 




Carpenter, ...... 


2 




Dining room, ...... 


21 


14 


Employees' cottage, .... 


1 


2 


Farm, 


17 




Farm group, ...... 




3 


Greenhouse, ...... 


8 




Industrial building, ..... 


16 




Kitchens, ...... 


10 


23 


Laundry, ...... 


12 


54 


Lawns, ....... 


7 




Music, ....... 




1 


Nurses' home, ..... 




4 


On roads, . . . . • . 


71 




Painter, ....... 


4 




Printer, ....... 


3 




School, ....... 


3 


29 


Sewing rooms, ..... 




39 


Store, ....... 


3 




Ward work, ...... 


117 


87 


With engineer, ..... 


1 




With yard man, ..... 


13 






328 


260 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



Gifts. 


Name. 


Place. 


Article. 


Mrs. L/Ouisa. Boes, . 


Mpw Ynrlr "NT V 
licW XOfK, 1> . x ., 




Mrs. Laura P. Stewart, . 


Boston, . 


Clothing. 


ur. w . in . Duiiara, 


Boston, 


Book, Orthopedic Surgery. 


\V . ±>. oaunaers, 

Mrs. Mary E. Morehouse, 


jrnuaaeipnia, ira., 
W^illimansett, 


Book, " A Reference Hand-book 

of Obstetric Nursing." 
Gifts for Christmas tree. 


xvionarci x . Hiiiioi, 


Boston, . . 




W. B. Saunders Company, 

Mice M T< iMnff 

ivuss ivi. Hi. ivuuurr, . . 


Springfield, . . 


on Nursing." 
Magazines . 


Airs. xv. x . uusnnian, 


Monson, . . . 


Dorcas calendars. 


Sumner Fiske, • • • 


Athol 


X it LUI C UUU Iv . 


xvicnaru x^. Hiiuot, • 


Boston, 


Plr»f Kino* 


ivirs. Hiiia i^tis, 


Roxbury, • 


VvlO tiling. 


Mrs. Catherine Healy, 


Qmncy, ... 




Rev. Abram Couklin, . 


IVXonson, • . * 


Magazines . 


Mrs. Henry Bradway, 


IVTonson, ... 


IVIagazmes . 


Mr. William Nairn, . . 


New Dorchester, . 


\Jl\J tiling . 


Mrs. ICenny, . • 


Dorchester, 


V-'lOLIllIlg. 


Dr. Woodworth, 


Fitchburg, 


Clothing and books. 


IVXlo. O. X . V_ U.>11 J Uti 11 , . 


J1UHMI11, . . . 




Mrs. Charles Carpenter, . . 




ATl rr o yin^c 
IVXtXgClZj ill Co . 


Mrs. Morris, .... 


Monson, . 


Magazines. 


Mr. Gove, .... 


East Boston, 


Clothing. 


Mrs. J. F. Holbrook, 


Palmer, . 


Reading matter. 


John Sullivan, 




Magazines. 


Sadie Holdridge, . 




Magazines. 


J. A. Talcott, 


Monson, . 


Reading matter. 



Medical Lectures. 

Dr. E. A. Kennedy, " Diseases of the Kidneys." 

Dr. A. V. Cooper, "Fevers." 

Dr. M. E. Cowen, " Bacteria and Bacteriology." 

Dr. M. B. Hodskins, "Antitoxins." 

Dr. A. C. Getchell, " Tuberculosis." 



1908. 

March 17, 
March 31, 
April 7, 
April 15, 
May 2, 



16 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Clergymen 

Rev. William Hart. 
Rev. F. S. Brewer. 
Rev. Chas. W. Williams. 
Rev. Geo. A. Andrews. 



HAVE HELD SERVICE. 

Rev. C. J. Sniffen. 
Rev. Francis W. Gibbs. 
Rev. Abram Conklin. 



Amusements. 

Dances, 50 ; masquerade, 1 ; readings and impersonations, 3 ; 
illustrated lectures, 6 ; moving pictures, 1 ; excursions to the 
lake, 22; excursions to fair, 2; dancing school, 26; physical 
culture classes, 9. 

Autopsies and Findings. 

No. 574. — Male. Autopsy, March 14, 1 008. Cerebral hemorrhage ; 
oedema of lungs. 

No. 981. — Male. Autopsy, Dec. 30, 1907. Tuberculosis of lungs; 
chronic nephritis; acute cystitis. 

No. 318. — Male. Autopsy, March 11, 1908. Pulmonary tubercu- 
losis; interstitial nephritis; oedema of lungs. 

No. 1530. — Male. Autopsy, May 5, 1908. CEdema of lungs; con- 
tracted transverse colon. 

No. 258. — Male. Autopsy, Jan. 5, 1908. Sclerosis of left internal 
capsule; oedema of lungs; chronic nephritis. 

No. 624. — Male. Autopsy, Jan. 11, 1908. (Edema of lungs; gastric 
ulcer (healed). 

No. 1048. — Male. Autopsy, Sept. 27, 1908. Cerebral hemorrhage; 
chronic nephritis; oedema of lungs. 

No. 1332. — Male. Autopsy, Nov. 23, 1907. CEdema of lungs. 

No. 1537. — Male. Autopsy, Sept. 6, 1908. CEdema of lungs. 

No. 1095. — Male. Autopsy, Aug. 19, 1908. CEdema and hypo- 
static congestion of the lungs. 

No. 1012. — Male. Autopsy, Oct. 30, 1908. CEdema and hypostatic 
congestion of the lungs. 

No. 338. — Male. Autopsy, May 11, 1908. Pulmonary tuberculosis ; 
oedema of lungs. 

No. 446. — Male. Autopsy, Aug. 20, 1908. Cerebral hemorrhage ; 
oedema of lungs. 

No. 1543. — Male. Autopsy, July 25, 1908. CEdema and hypostatic 
congestion of the lungs. 

No. 896. — Male. Autopsy, May 3, 1908. Chronic nephritis ; hyper- 
trophy of the' heart; oedema of lungs. 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



No. 451. — Male. Autopsy, March 27, 1908. Hypostatic congestion 
and oedema of lungs; chronic hydrocephalus. 

No. 1148. — Male. Autopsy, March 21, 1908. Cerebral hemorrhage ; 
chronic nephritis; hypertrophy of heart. 

No. 112. — Female. Autopsy, March 16, 1908. General peritonitis, 
acute; duodenal ulcer (perforated); acute splenitis. 

No. 1457. — Female. Autopsy, Sept. 2, 1908. Hypostatic conges- 
tion and oedema of lungs. 

No. 472. — Female. Autopsy, July 19, 1908. (Edema of lungs; 
chronic nephritis; hypertrophy of heart. 

No. 568. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 4, 1907. Hypostatic congestion 
of lungs; chronic cholecystis; cerebral hemorrhage. 

No. 345. — Female. Autopsy, Jan. 25, 1908. (Edema of lungs ; 
chronic nephritis; hypertrophy of heart. 

No. 1007. — Female. Autopsy, April 13, 1908. (Edema and hypo- 
static congestion of the lungs. 

No. 1469. — Female. Autopsy, April 25, 1908. Brain tumor; 
chronic nephritis; oedema of the lungs. 

No. 1113. — Female. Autopsy, April 19, 1908. (Edema of lungs; 
chronic hydrocephalus. 

No. 198. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 7, 1907. (Edema of lungs; cyst 
of right ovary; acute splenitis. 

No. 619. — Female. Autopsy, Nov. 13, 1 908. Hypostatic congestion 
and oedema of lungs; chronic nephritis; fibroids of uterus. 

No. 1309. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 1, 1907. Hypoplasia of heart 
and arterial system; oedema of lungs; pleuritic adhesions; cerebral 
sclerosis ( ? ) ; cyst of right ovary. 

No. 525. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 6, 1907. (Edema of lungs; 
cerebral sclerosis ; chronic hydrocephalus. 

No. 72. — Female. Autopsy, Dec. 18, 1907. (Edema of lungs ; acute 
peritonitis; gastric ulcer (perforated). 

No. 1125. — Female. Autopsy, Jan. 17, 1908. Pulmonary tubercu- 
losis; acute splenitis. 

No. 842. — Female. Autopsy, Sept. 7, 1908. (Edema of lungs; 
acute splenitis; cloudy swelling of kidneys. 

Operations. 

Transplantation of flexor carpi ulnaris to extensors of fingers and 
thumb. 

Transference of posterior-tibial through interosseous membrane to 
osseous insertion on upper side of cuboid. 

Correction of equino-varus and transference of anterior tibial. 
Transference of tendon in fore arm. 

Fasciotomy, myotomy and transference of flexor carpi ulnaris. 



18 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



Correction of equino-varus. 
Correction of extreme equinus. 

Section of iliofemoral band, adductors, hamstring and tendo- 
Achillis. 

Tonsilotomy. 

List of Graduates. 



Names. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Fannie C. Cronin, 
Mary E. Kilduff, . 


1901, 
1901, 


Massachusetts Hospital for Epi- 
leptics, supervisor. 
Private nursing, 


Palmer. 
Springfield. 


Emma S. McKeever, 


1901, 


At State Farm, .... 


State Farm. 


Julia A. O'Brien, . 
Edith E. B. Townsend, 


1901, 
1901. 


Private nursing, 

Married, ..... 


22 Kenilworth St., 

Roxbury. 
Bragville, Me. 


Carroll W. Briggs, 


1902, 


At Boston City Hospital, 


Boston. 


A. M. D. Manwarring, . 
Edwin S. Manwarring, 
James L. McKeever, 


1902, 
1902, 
1902, 


Nurse, Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 

Supervisor, Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

At State Farm, .... 


Palmer. 
Palmer. 
State Farm. 


Walter L. McKeever, 


1902, 


_ 


Middletown, Conn. 


Hattie Edith Rowe, 


1902, 


Private nursing, 


Georgetown, Me. 


Alice B. Smith, 
Marguerite Casey, 


1902, 
1903, 


Bookkeeping, .... 
Private nursing, 


27 Newburn Ave- 
nue, Medford. 
Burlington, Vt. 


Catherine Daley, . 


1903, 


Connecticut Hospital for Insane, 


Middletown, Conn. 


Georgie A. Nute, . 


1903, 


At Stamford Hall, 


Stamford, Conn. 


George J. Flint, 


1903, 






Mae D. Brown, 


1905, 




Portland, Me. 


Annie A. Caldwell, 


1905, 


Private nursing, 


Springfield. 


Louis A. Fontaine, 


1905, 




Palmer, Mass. 


Frank L. Morway, 
Christine McClellan, 
Theresa A. Brown, 


1905, 
1906, 
1907, 


Apothecary, Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 
Married, . . ... 


Palmer. 

Prince Edward 
Island. 


Mary G. Hancock, 


1907, 


Private nursing, 


Holyoke. 


Elizabeth McCarthy, 
Mary Anna Woodward, 


1907, 
1907, 


Head nurse, Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 


Palmer. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 


Samuel E. Chase, . 
William L. Paine, 
Edith M. Brooks, . 
Eva G. Caldwell, . 
Mary J. Caldwell, 
Susan E. Crumb, . 


1907, 
1907, 
1908, 
1908, 
1908, 
1908, 


Assistant supervisor, Massachusetts 
Hospital for Epileptics. 

Attendant, Massachusetts Hos- 
pital for Epileptics. 

Nurse, Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 

Nurse, Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 

Nurse, Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 


Palmer. 
Palmer. 
Palmer. 
Palmer. 
Palmer. 


Daisy I. Dowling, 


1908, 


Private nursing, 


Brockton. 


Olla G. Dowling, . 


1908, 


Private nursing, 


Boston. 


Dora L. Jacques, . 


1908, 


Private nursing, 


Holyoke. 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 19 



List of Graduates — Concluded. 



Names. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Agnes M. Millen, . 


1908, 




Syracuse, I 


f. Y. 


Anna L. Millen, 


1908, 


: : : 






Katherine C. Murray, 
Mae P. Leeman, . 


1908, 
1908, 


Nurse. Massachusetts Hospital for 

Epileptics. 
Nurse, Massachusetts Hospital for 

Epileptics. 


Palmer. 
Palmer. 





The nurses have worked away from the hospital 303% days. 
Respectfully submitted, 

EYEKETT FLOOD. M.D., 

Superintendent. 



20 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 
The methods by which patients are admitted to this hospital 
are as follows : — 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. The sane indigent; in this case the approval of a judge 
is required, in addition to the physicians' certificates and the 
notification of the town authorities. 

3. The sane private, in which two sureties are required to 
sign the patient's application. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. 
Patients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out 
alone. They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to 
bed early. These restrictions are not irksome when they are 
fully understood, and can be complied with easily. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much 
the same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the 
address for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany 
railroad, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the 
junction of the Boston & Albany and the New London northern 
division of the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch of 
the Boston & Albany railroad has one terminus in Palmer, the 
other in Winchendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, and 
the railroad fare is $1.70. 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



21 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
SEWING ROOM. 



Made. 




Mattress protectors, 


153 


Gingham aprons, 


85 


Table napkins, 


465 


Aprons, 


. 499 


Curtains, . 


108 


Bibs, 


. 435 


Denim curtains, 


3 


Bureau scarfs, . 


179 


Suits, . 


13 


Bags, 


41 


Bed socks, 


15 


Burial robes, 


10 


Night gowns, . 


735 


Chestnut bag, . 


1 


Shirts, . 


39 


Barber aprons, 


3 


•Dispensary aprons, . 


6 


Bath robes, 


8 


Pillow slips, 


94 


Corset covers, . 


. 217 


Vests, . 


21 


Petticoats, 


. 135 


Holders, . . . . 


21 


Dresses, 


. 316 


Rubber pillow covers, 


20 


Night shirts, 


. 279 


Sheets, . 


29 


Towels, 


. 2,706 


Jumpers, . 


38 


Mittens, pairs, 


367 


Dusters, . 


48 


Coats, 


. 194 


Chemises, 


118 


Overalls, pairs, 


77 


Skirts, . 


2 


Rug-s, 


. 114 


Photo bags, 


6 


Drawers, pairs, 


. 259 


Hot-water bottle covers, . 


17 


Tray cloths, 


72 


Blankets, . 


57 


Garters, pairs, . 


. 458 


Sofa pillows, . 


3 


Tick pillow covers, . 


7 


Bandages, 


6 


Kitchen aprons, 


44 


Stand or table covers, 


20 


Pants, pairs, . 


. 113 


Couch cover, . 


1 


Suspenders, pairs, . 


. 234 


Ties, . 


6 


Long night shirts, . 


44 


Cushions, 


2 


Table cloths, . 


. 182 


Jacket ties, 


20 


Diapers, . • . 


30 


Garter waists, . 


6 


Typewriter cover, 


1 


Mangle covers, 


1 


Toilet napkins, 


43 


Buttons, . 


10 


Laundry bags, 


85 






Shirt waists, 


25 


Repaired. 




Masquerade costumes, 


12 


Coats, . 


356 


Caps, 


. 124 


Chemises, 


3 


Piano cover, 


1 


Waists, . 


6 


Gymnasium suits, 


9 


Dresses, . 


155 



22 HOSPITAL FOR 



Hose, pairs, . . . 4,655 

Bibs, .... 77 

Overcoats, ... 13 

Pants, pairs, . . . 771 

Aprons, .... 135 

Overalls, pairs, . . 415 

Jumpers, .... 268 

Night shirts, ... 373 

Men's suits, ... 8 

Dispensary aprons, . . 10 

Towels, .... 84 

Laundry bag, . . . 52 

Horse blanket, ... 1 

Tick suspenders, . . 26 

Drawers, pairs, . . 533 

Shirts, .... 866 

Bedspreads, ... 42 

Fine under linen, pieces, . 3 

Rugs, .... 4 

Mattress protectors, . 84 

Sheets, .... 29 



EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

Curtains, .... 10 

Night gowns, ... 63 

Table cloths, ... 12 

Blouses, .... 6 

Pillow slips, ... 2 

Waists, .... 6 

Bed ticks, ... 7 

Blankets, .... 55 

Petticoats, ... 51 

Sweaters, ... 2 

Union suits, ... 3 

Corset covers, ... 5 

Skirts, . ... 11 

Bag, . ... 1 

Flags, .... 2 

Bath robe, ... 1 

Hoods, .... 34 

Vests, .... 62 

Caps, .... 6 

Masquerade costumes, . 20 

Restraint jackets, . . 2 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 23 



ARTICLES REPAIRED ON THE WARD. 



Pants, pairs, 


. 948 


Bibs, 


37 


Coats, 


. 533 


Laundry bags, . 


14 


Shirts, 


. 1,174 


Night shirts, 


39 


Drawers, pairs, 


. 519 


Towels, 


10 


Vests, 


81 


Hose, pairs, 


7 


Balls made, 


23 


Pillow slips, 


2 


Aprons, 


87 


Ties, 


3 



24 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Men's slippers made, pair* 


463 


Shoes repaired, pairs, . 1,702 


Men's shoes made, pairs, . 


4 


Shoes marked, pairs, 


159 


Women's shoes made, pairs, 10 


Mattresses made over, 


146 


Rope rags made, 


26 


Umbrellas repaired, . 


127 


Office envelopes made, 


1,150 


Chairs reseated, 


63 


Head marks for cemetery 




Pillows renovated, . 


538 


carved, . . . . 


9 


Parts of harnesses repaired, 


24 


Greenhouse marker made, 


2,300 


Barber chairs repaired, . 


3 


Coat hangers made, . 


114 


Rugs repaired, 


10 


Door plate carved, . 


3 


Screens repaired, 


15 


Numbers carved, 


236 


Camp stools repaired, 


10 


Brooms made, . 


71 


Hassocks repaired, . 


2 


Pill envelopes made, 


1,200 


Bells repaired, 


3 


Blanks printed, 


10,900 


Carpets repaired, 


1 


Copies of lectures, rules, 




Fire escapes repaired, 


2 


essays, etc., printed, 


3,600 


Truss repaired, 


1 


Note heads printed, . 


13,000 . 


Baseball mittens repaired, 


1 


Envelopes printed, . 


700 


Baseballs repaired, . 


10 


Names printed, 


38 


Broom handles sand pa- 




Woolen coats cut, 


27 


pered, .... 


900 


Woolen trousers cut, 


22 


Dust brooms resewed, 


60 


Woolen vests cut, 


23 


Chairs repaired, 


12 


Denim coats cut, 


85 


Barber footstools repaired, 


2 


Denim trousers cut, pairs, 


141 


Basket repaired, 


1 


Denim vests, 


3 


Morris chair cushion re- 




Summer coats, 


80 


paired, .... 


1 


Overalls made, pairs, 


110 


Gloves repaired, pairs, 


3 


Patterns drafted, coat, 


24 


Curtains hung, 


8 


Patterns drafted, trousers, 


15 


Suspenders repaired, pairs, 


5 


Patterns drafted, vests, 


25 







1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



25 



FARM PRODUCTS. 

From Dec. 1, 1907, to Dec. 1, 1908. 



Apples, cider, 177 bushels, at $0.10, $17 70 

Apples, crab, 34 bushels, at $1, 34 00 

Apples, eating, 277 barrels, at $3, 831 00 

Beans, field, 4 bushels, at $2.25, 10 00 

Beans, green shell, 58 bushels, at $1.25, .... 72 50 

Beans, string, 75 bushels, at $1.25, 93 75 

Beef, 1,109 pounds, at $0.07, 77 63 

Beets, 149 bushels, at $0.50, 74 50 

Beet greens, 44 bushels, at $0.35, 15 40 

Cabbage, 2,500 heads, at $5 per hundred head, . . . 125 00 

Carrots, 329 bushels, at $0.50, 164 50 

Cider, 380 gallons, at $0.10, 38 00 

Corn, husked, 892 bushels, at $0.50, 446 00 

Corn, sweet, 316 bushels, at $0.75, 237 00 

Cucumbers, 45 boxes, at $1.50, 67 50 

Cucumbers, pickling, 16 bushels, at $1.60, .... 25 60 

Currants, 212 quarts, at $0.11, 23 32 

Ensilage, 475 tons, at $3, 1,425 00 

Fodder, green, 225 tons, at $6, 1,350 00 

Hay, 212 tons, at $16, 3,392 00 

Hay, meadow, 18 tons, at $10, 180 00 

* Hay, oat, 35 tons, at $14, 490 00 

Lamb, 754 pounds, at $0.10, 75 40 

Lettuce, 44V 2 dozen bunches, at $0.60, .... 26 70 

Milk, 278,887 quarts, at $0.05, 13,944 35 

Mutton, 1,501 pounds, at $0.08, 120 08 

Onions, 135 bushels, at $0.85, 114 75 

Parsnips, 400 bushels, at $0.75, 300 00 

Pears, 27 bushels, at $1, 27 00 

Peas, green, 30 bushels, at $1, 30 00 

Peppers, 3y 2 bushels, at $0.75, 2 63 

Pork, 9,053 pounds, at $0.08, 724 24 

Potatoes, 802 bushels, at $0.80, 641 60 



Amount carried forward, 



$25,197 15 



26 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

Amount brought forward, $25,197 15 

Pumpkins, 1,200 pounds, at $0.03, 36 00 

Radishes, 2,765 dozen bunches, at $0.40 dozen bunches, . 1,106 00 

Radish, horse, 3 bushels, at $0.50, 1 50 

Rhubarb, 3,496 pounds, at $0.02, 69 92 

Squash, summer, 40 barrels, at $1, 40 00 

Squash, winter, 106 barrels, at $1.50, .... 159 00 

. Tomatoes, green, 95 bushels, at $0.50, .... 47 50 

Tomatoes, ripe, 148 bushels, at $0.75, .... 101 00 

Turnips, 89 barrels, at $1, . . . . . . 89 00 

Veal, 146V 2 pounds, at $0.11, 16 12 

Products from the Greenhouse. 

Asparagus, 3 boxes, at $3, 9 00 

Beans, string, 9 bushels, at $1.25, 11 25 

Beets, 2V 2 bushels, at $0.50, 1 25 

Cabbage, 570 heads, at $0.05, 28 50 

Carrots, 4 bushels, at $0.50, 2 00 

Celery, 80 boxes, at $0.85, 68 00 

Corn, 31 bushels, at $0.75, 23 25 

Cucumbers, 35 boxes, at $1.50, 52 50 

Cucumbers, pickling, 3 pecks, at $0.40, .... 1 20 

Eggs, 531 dozen, at $0.35, 185 85 

Fowls, 29 pounds, at $0.15, ...... 4 35 

Greens, dandelions, 13 bushels, at $0.75, .... 9 75 

Lettuce, 13 boxes, at $0.60, 7 80 

Onions, 1 bushel, at $0.85, ....... 85 

Peas, iy 2 bushels, at $1, 1 50 

Radishes, 12 dozen bunches, at $0.40 dozen bunches, . . 4 80 

Rhubarb, 12 pounds, at $0.02, 24 

Squash, summer, 2y 2 barrels, at $1, 2 50 

Tomatoes, green, 9 bushels, at $0.50, 4 50 » 

Tomatoes, ripe, 11 bushels, at $0.75, 8 25 

Cut flowers, 100 00 

Plants, . . . . . 200 00 



$27,590 53 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at the Massachusetts Hospital for 
Epileptics. 



Superintendent, per year, . 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Steward, per year, 
Engineer, per year, 
Treasurer, per year, . 
Clerk, per month, 
Office assistants (2), per month, 
Supervisors (women, 2), per month, . 
Assistant supervisor (woman), per month, 
Supervisor (man), per month, . 
Supervisor (man), per month, . 
Assistant supervisors (men, 2), per month 
Night nurses (women, 8), per month, . 
Nurses (women, 25), per month, 
Night nurses (men, 8), per month, 
Nurses (men, 30), per month, . 
Assistant engineer, per month, . . - 
Assistant engineer, per month, . 
Assistant engineers (2), per day, 
Firemen (3), per day, 
Baker, per month, .... 
Kitchen men (2), per month, 
Store assistants (2), per month, 
Cooks (5), per month, 
Assistant cooks (10), per month, 
Table girls (4), per month, . 



$3,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
1,200 00 
1,100 00 
900 00 
30 00 
$20 00-25 00 
35 00-40 00 
35 00 
45 00 
40 00 
$35 00-37 00 
20 00-30 00 
20 00-30 00 
25 00-35 00 
25 00-35 00 
57 17 
35 00 
$1 50-1 85 
1 50-1 85 
60 00 
$23 00-25 00 
34 00-40 00 
27 00-35 00 
18 00-20 00 
IS 00-20 00 



28 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

Assistant seamstresses (5), per month, . . . $16 00-18 00 

Laundress, per month, 22 00 

Laundryman, per month, 40 00 

Assistant laundresses (5), per month, . . . $16 00-18 00 

Farmer, per month, 75 00 

Assistant farmers (18), per month, .... $23 00-35 00 

Head carpenter, per day, 3 00 

Assistant carpenters (2), per day, 2 50 

Painter, without board, per day, 2 50 

Painter, per month, 40 00 

Mason, per month, , . 65 00 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



29 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Epileptics. 

The report of the finances of this institution for the year 
ending Nov. 30, 1908, is herewith respectfully submitted. 



Assets. 

Real estate : — 
Cultivated land, 113 acres. 

Woodland, 21 acres, 

Pasturage, 104 acres, .... 
Farm (under appropriation of 1901) , viz. 

Cultivated land, 40 acres, . 

Woodland, 50 acres, 

Pasturage, 30 acres. 
Farm (under appropriation of 1903), viz. 

Cultivated land, 53 acres, . 

Woodland, 190 acres, . 

Pasturage, 57 acres. 
Water and sewerage system, 
Outside electric lighting (farm group), 
Quarry, 



Building-s : — 

Original buildings, 

Building (under appropriation of 1895). . 
Building's (under appropriation of 1899). . 
Nurses' home, ) (under appropriation 
Electric building, f of 1902). 
Boiler house (under appropriation of 

1900), 

Laundry (under appropriation of 1901), . 
Coal trestle, woodwork, . . . . 
Greenhouses and hen houses, 



$17,311 00 
1,465 00 
4,487 00 

1,600 00 
1.100 00 
300 00 

1,219 00 
2,850 00 
855 00 
38.947 94 
800 00 
450 00 



$39,620 00 
84,800 00 
87.933 35 

26.345 00 

5.050 00 
9,500 00 
250 00 
2,600 00 



$71,384 94 



Amounts carried forward, . . . $256,098 35 $71,384 94 



30 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Farm group (under appropriation of 1903), 
viz. : — 

Nos. 1 and 2, 

No. 3, 

Barns, 

Farm cottage and barns (under appropria- 
tion of 1901), 

Storehouse, 

Chas. A. Clough building, .... 
Stone crusher (under appropriation of 

1906) , 

New building, women's south, 

Horse stable (under appropriation of 

1907) , 

Building for male nurses (under appro- 
priation of 1908), 

Personal property : — 
Provisions and groceries, .... 

E-eady-made clothing, 

Dry goods : — 

For clothing, 

For bedding, 

Furnishings : — 

Beds and bedding in inmates' depart- 
ment, 

Other furnishings in inmates' depart- 
ment, 

Personal property of State in super 
intendent's department, . 

All other property, 
Heat, light and power : — 

Fuel, ...... 

All other property, 
Repairs and improvements : — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

All other property, 
Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Live stock on the farm, 

Produce of the farm on hand, 

Carriages and agricultural implements 

All other property. 



$256,098 35 $71,384 94 



27,957 52 

6,248 38 

2,827 97 

2,400 00 

1,963 19 

75,000 00 

2,000 00 

75,000 00 

6,000 00 

3,508 83 



459,004 24 



$1,773 42 
2,433 25 

1,339 77 
1,168 62 



19,274 41 

29,711 62 

8,257 16 
7,699 93 

7,037 92 
687 20 



47,550 97 
1,443 45 



11,047 20 
4,034 85 
4,506 85 
2,690 81 



Amounts carried forward, 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



31 



Amounts brought forward, 



$150,657 43 $530,389 18 



Miscellaneous : — 

Drugs and medicines, . 
Tobacco, .... 
Library, . . 
Other supplies undistributed, 



2,383 90 
69 39 
1,075 00 
3,969 21 



158,154 93 



Total, 



,544 11 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1907, $4,000 00 

Received from State on special appro- 
priations : — ■ 

Building and furnishings, 1906, . . . $17,059 72 

Alterations, etc., 1907, .... 1,717 93 

Constructing silos, 1907, .... 7 80 

Horse stable, 1907, ..... 1,877 24 

Building for male employees, 1908, . . 2,937 70 

Finishing rooms for female employees, 1908, 131 01 

Moving barn, 1908, 500 00 

Ensilage cutter and motor, 1908, . . 300 00 

Bread oven, 1908, 1,333 35 

Total from special appropriations, . 25,864 75 



Received from State for maintenance, . $151,468 14 
Received from cities and towns for sup- 
port of patients, 39,408 03 

Received from individuals for support of 

patients, 9,210 28 

Received from reimbursements for support 

of patients, 1,261 26 

Received from soldiers' relief for support 

of patients, 169 92 

Received from farm and farm produce, . 324 87 

Received from store, . . . ... 583 24 

Received from interest on bank deposit, . 218 23 

Received from sundries, .... 209 75 



202,853 72 



Total receipts, 



$232,718 47 



32 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Expenditures. 

Salaries, wages and labor, $61,431 86 

Food : — 

Butter, $5,650 79 

Beans, 171 33 

Bread and crackers, 339 80 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., .... 1,615 27 

Cheese, . . .... . 140 86 

Eggs, 2,262 19 

Flour, . . 4,369 85 

Fish, ........ 1,327 49 

Dried and fresh fruit, .... 1,350 03 

Meats, 9,105 89 

Milk, 5 60 

Molasses and syrup, 443 63 

Sugar, 2,144 94 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, . . . 630 60 

Vegetables, 1,465 37 

Sundries, ....... 1,458 19 

Freight on food, 136 52 

32,618 35 

Clothing and clothing material : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, .... $591 59 

Clothing, . 1,620 83 

Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, . 1,498 16 

Furnishing goods, 61 14 

Hats and caps, 47 25 

Leather and shoe findings, .... 378 43 

Sundries, . ' 64 63 

Freight on clothing and clothing material, . 17 88 

4,279 91 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . . . $1,700 79 

Brushes, brooms, etc., 333 53 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 593 16 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . . 919 18 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 895 72 

Kitchen furnishings, 424 92 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., . . 175 39 

Sundries, 471 38 

Freight on furnishings, .... 38 45 

5,552 52 



Amount carried forward, 



$103,882 64 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 33 

Amount brought forward, $103,882 64 

Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, $13,642 09 

Gas, 4 00 

Oil, 119 57 

Sundries, 27 34 

13,793 00 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick, $127 00 

Cement, lime and plaster, .... 242 93 

Doors, sashes, etc., 56 04 

Electrical work and supplies, . . . 1,030 87 

Hardware, iron, steel, etc., .... 878 37 

Lumber, 919 17 

Machinery, etc., 759 73 

Paints, oils, glass, etc., .... 1,5S0 90 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, . . 2,599 41 

Roofing and materials, .... 6 25 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll), . 515 31 

Sundries, 248 43 

Freight on repairs and improvements, . 236 34 

9,200 75 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., .... $206 40 

Chapel services and entertainments, . . 1,297 61 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . 536 28 

Funeral expenses, 199 50 

Gratuities, . 105 22 

Hose, etc., 233 95 

Ice, 277 62 

Labor (not on pay roll), .... 1,412 94 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . 1,952 82 

Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), . 58 12 

Postage, 364 83 

Printing and printing supplies, ... 16 08 

Return of runaways, 77 41 

Soap and laundry supplies, . . . 1,348 93 

Stationery and office supplies, . . . 383 43 

School books and school supplies, . . 10 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 459 05 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 149 79 

Tobacco, 686 91 

Water, 1,036 19 



Amounts carried forward, 



$10,803 18 $126,876 39 



34 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . . . $10,803 18 $126,876 39 

Sundries, 640 38 

Printing annual report, .... 147 96 

Freight on miscellaneous, .... 78 05 

11,669 57 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Blacksmith and supplies, .... $159 05 

Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, . . 562 11 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . . . 633 62 

Hay, grain, etc., 7,702 10 

Harnesses and repairs, .... 98 00 

Horses, . . . . . . 275 00 

Cows, 654 15 

Other live stock, 65 60 

Labor (not on pay roll), .... 1,521 43 

Rent, 20 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., . . . 442 90 

Sundries, 292 13 

Freight, 196 09 

12,922 18 



Total expense for maintenance, $151,468 14 

Other expenses on special appropriations, .... 25,864 75 

Paid State Treasurer, 51,280 60 

Refunded to individuals, 104 98 



Total expenditures, $228,718 47 

Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1908, ■ 4,000 00 



$232,718 47 

Resources. 

Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1908, . . . $4,000 00 
Balance of maintenance with State Treas- 
urer, 4,739 27 

Bills receivable for board, .... 13,022 56 

Other bills receivable, 62 24 

Unexpended special appropriations, . . 9,707 83 

$31,531 90 

Liabilities. 

Salaries unpaid, $4,955 61 

Maintenance bills, 3,780 28 

Special appropriations, bills, . . . 923 83 

9,659 72 



Resources over liabilities, $21,872 18 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 35 



Statement of Appropriations. 





Amount. 


Expended 
previously. 


Expended 
Last 
Twelve 
Months. 


Balance. 


Building and furnishings, 1906, 


$80,000 00 


$62,605 56 


$17,059 72 


$334 72 


Alterations, etc., 1907, .... 


3,400 00 


849 10 


1,717 93 


832 97 


Constructing silos, 1907, 


1,100 00 


- 


7 80 


1,092 20 


Horse stable, 1907 


6,000 00 


4,122 76 


1,877 24 


- 


Building for male employees, 1908, . 


5,900 00 


- 


2,937 70 


2,962 30 


Finishing rooms for female employees, 1908, 


3,900 00 


- 


131 01 


3,768 99 


Moving barn, 1908, .... 


500 00 




500 00 




Ensilage cutter and motor, 1908, 


850 00 




300 00 


550 00 


Renewal of heating pipes, 1908, 


350 00 






350 00 


Bread oven, 1908, .... 


1,500 00 




1,333 35 


166 65 




$103,500 00 


$67,577 42 


$25,864 75 


$10,057 83 



Nurses' Training School Fund. 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1907, $219 35 

Twelve months' receipts, 618 55 



$837 90 

Twelve months' payments, 452 36 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1908, $385 54 

Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $70 72 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 300 00 

Cash in vault at hospital, 14 82 



$385 54 

Patients' Money. 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1907, $770 56 

Twelve months' receipts, 2,193 08 

$2,963 64 

Twelve months' payments, 2,263 79 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1908, $699 85 



36 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 1908. 



Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, $535 94 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, 34 29 

Cash in vault at hospital, 129 62 



$699 85 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER E. HATCH, 

Treasurer. 

This certifies that I have compared the treasurer's report for the year ending 
Nov. 30, 1908, with the books kept at the institution, and find them to agree. The 
cash account shows a balance in the treasurer's hands of $4,000, as follows: — 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $2,650 13 

Cash vouchers, etc., not entered, ..... 1,252 90 
Cash in safe at hospital, ....... 96 97 

$4,000 00 

GEORGE L. CLARK, 
Dec. 18, 1908. Examiner. 



* 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



O N CT: CM U3 CM ;£ d 
s, ~J -r l~ — 

u- CM CM 3C — 



cm cm ;c i>- 10 



cor~ cm co 
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NCXC- CCS5S OC t>- Ci CS LI 

co ^ o *-< 



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cr. cs i icni 



jCNM CM ' 
CM TP 1-1 i 



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CM — I 

CO CO 



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cm v= :c cm co : 



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HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



<M "tf CO 



CO lO t-i 

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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 





a 
•< 


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C5 CO — 
TJ.CM — 


CO 


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OS- 


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CO 


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CO 


| C0»0 | — CO — — CM | | 


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fa 


s^uamy 






| IOH | CO | H | H | I 


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I CO O CO 00 ■<»< CO — CM 1 1 


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1 00 lO CM ■* CM CM 1 — | | 


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CO 


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CM 


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Massachusetts, ..... 

Other New England States, . 

Other States, ..... 


Total native, 


Other countries: — 
Azores, ...... 

Canada, ...... 

England, ...... 

Germany, ...... 

Ireland, ...... 

Italy, 

Russia, ...... 

Scotland 

Sweden, ...... 

Switzerland, ..... 

West Indies, ..... 


Total foreign, .... 
Unknown, ...... 





42 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





First 
km 


admitted to 
Hospital. 


UTHEB 


Admissions. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 




t 






2 






S 






to 


£ 


■ 

.2 


w 


1 


CO 

.2 










1 


fa 


E? 






EH 


a 






A. — Insane: — 




















Barnstable County, 


1 




1 


- 






1 




1 


Berkshire County, 




2 


2 




1 


1 




3 


3 


Bristol County, 




- 






1 


1 


- 


1 




Essex County, 


5 


2 


7 


- 


- 


- 


5 


2 


7 


Franklin County, . 


2 


7 


2 




- 




2 




2 


Hampden County, 


3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


4 




5 


Hampshire County, 


2 




2 


— 






2 




2 


Middlesex County, 


12 


11 


23 


1 


- 


1 


13 


11 


24 


Nantucket County, 




1 


1 




— 




- 


1 


1 


Norfolk County, 




















Plymouth County, 


1 


2 


3 


- 






1 


2 


3 


Suffolk County, 


23 


11 


34 


1 


J 


2 


24 


12 


36 


Worcester County, 


9 


2 


11 


2 


1 


3 


11 


3 


14 


Unknown, 


" 


1 


1 


- 


- 


— 


~ 


1 


1 


Totals, . 


58 


33 


91 


5 


4 


9 


63 


37 


100 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or 




















over), ..... 


36 


17 


53 


5 


4 


9 


41 


21 


62 


Country districts (under 10,000), 


22 


15 


37 


~ 






22 


15 


38 


Unknown, .... 


- 


1 


1 










1 




B. — Sane: — 




















Barnstable County, 


1 


- 


1 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Berkshire County, 




3 


3 






~ 


— 


3 


3 


Bristol County, 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


2 


3 


5 


Essex County, 


13 


8 


21 


1 




1 


14 


8 


22 


Franklin County, . 


— 




I 


1 




1 




I 


2 


Hampden County, 


3 


4 


7 


1 




1 


4 


4 


8 


Hampshire County, 


1 




f 








1 




1 


ITllUUlCoCA VUUlllj , . 


9 


6 


15 




2 


3 


10 


8 


18 


Norfolk County, 


2 


4 


6 








2 


4 


6 


Plymouth County, 


1 




1 








1 






Suffolk County, 


26 


14 


40 


5 




5 


31 


14 


45 


Worcester County, 


6 


5 


11 


1 


5 


6 


7 


10 


17 


Totals, . 


63 


46 


109 


11 


9 


20 


74 


55 


129 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or 




















over), ..... 


43 


31 


74 


9 


9 


18 


52 


40 


92 


Country districts (under 10,000), 


20 


15 


35 


2 




2 


22 


15 


37 



5. — Civil Conditions of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 




i 


unales. 




m 

<U 

"5 


traalcs. 






imales. 


05 

s 




i 




O 

EH 


S 


fa 


e2 




fa 



EH 


Unmarried, .... 


55 


30 


85 


54 


36 


90 


109 


66 


175 


Married, ..... 


3 




3 


6 


8 


14 


9 


8 


17 


Widowed, .... 




3 


3 


2 




3 


2 


4 


6 


Divorced, .... 








1 


1 


2 


1 


1. 


2 


Totals 


58 


33 


91 


63 


46 


109 


121 


79 


200 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 43 

6. — Occupation of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



MALES. 









m 




o 








C 


c 
3 
S3 


~3 

o 




03 
C 


c 

CO 


o 


Bookkeeper, . 


— 


1 


1 


Packer, 


— 


2 


2 


Broom maker, 


- 


1 


1 


Painter, 


1 


— 


1 


Candy maker, 


— 


1 


1 


Peddler, 


— 


2 


2 


Carriage painter, 




1 


1 


Printer, 


1 




1 


Clergyman, . 


- 


1 


1 


Property man, 




1 


1 


Clerk, . 




6 


6 


Salesman, 




1 


1 


Farmer, 




2 


2 


Shoemaker, . 




2 


2 


Gardener, 


1 




1 


Student, 




5 


5 


Janitor, 




1 


1 


Tailor, . 




2 


2 


Laborer, 


5 


3 


8 


Teamster, 




2 


2 


Machinist, 




1 


1 


No occupation, 


49 


26 


75 


Messenger, 




1 


1 




















Mill operative, 


1 


4 


5 


Totals, . 


58 


63 


121 



FEMALES. 



Actress, 




1 


1 


Student, 




2 


2 


Domestic, 


1 


2 


3 


No occupation, 


30 


32 


62 


Housekeeper, 


1 


5 


6 
















Housewife, 


1 


2 


3 


Totals, . 


33 


46 


79 


Mill operative, 




2 


2 











WIFE OR DAUGHTER OF 



Barber, 




1 


1 


Laborer, 


4 


3 




Bookkeeper, . 




1 


1 


Merchant, 




1 




Carpenter, 




2 


2 


Miller, . 




1 




Carriage maker, 




1 


1 


Mill operative, 




1 




Cigar maker, 


1 




1 


Minister, 




1 




Conductor, 




1 


1 


Orator, 


1 






Dyer, . 


1 




1 


Proprietor, 




1 




Farmer, 


1 


2 


3 


Shoemaker, . 


1 


1 


2 


Florist, 




1 


1 


Teamster, 




2 


2 


Foreman, 




1 


1 


Unknown, 


23 


24 


47 


Gardener, 




1 


1 


















Grocer, 


1 




1 


Totals, . 


33 


46 


79 



44 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



I 

O 

* I 

a; b 

e 

CO 



C?5 



AT TIME OF DEATH. 


•SIBJOX 


I COU5COU5 1 !M CM CM CM »-< i-l 


CM 


26 
34.61 




| CM CM CM CM 1 1 iHrtMrtrt 




o 
t 




| -HCO^CO I W iH rH | | | 


CM | 


12 

28.33 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 




won i -h—i i i ! i 




26 
16.18 


•S3[BOI8j 


«-< lO CM till 1-H.-H I | | 


O -<t< 


14 

17.25 


•831^ 


^lO»H | HH 1 1 1 1 1 1 


a>eo 


CM 

~* US 



B DO 



•sj^ox 



I CO | r-l | H I CM CM 



I COCO I CO~<^H 



•sj^ox 



I oo — h i-i ce »o e» io cm i 



I •<*<c©CMCMcMeoCO^H 



i iO CS CO CO CO CM — c I 



8 ^ 


•sf;ox 


CM iO -<1< CM CO CM I 
CM 


1 — 1 1 1 1 


C5CM 

co»c 




13.20 
























14.72 


IRST / 
EPILI 


•sajBuiaj 


I OCOHMrH | 


1 1 1 1 1 


00 l« 


eo 
ra 


EJ ° 






1 | | | 


CM CO 


00 


11.90 



8 . 
1% 



■8[«J0X 



> r? -* — 1 «« t- "5 ~* 



1 co cm eo cm co eo l | 



I -«j< m ess oo eo cm . 



CM | CM lO 



OOGOOOTOOOCCOOCCEjCGQ 

C3c3cijo3c3c3c3c3e3o3 
03Q)CDCDCDOja3cDCDCD 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> >> 



<(M(NC0COTj<iOCOt^00 



00 . 

Is 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 




mum 
u i i 



46 HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. [Dec. 

8. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



Predisposing Causes. 





A 


DMITTED. 


HEREDITARY 


NEUROTIC 


ALCOHOLIC 


EXCITING CAUSES. 












TENDENCT. 
































£ 


3 

s 


A 


S 


i 


1 


o5 


i 
1 


J 


o 


09 

s 

s 


to 




a 


fa 


| 


s 


fa 




1 


1 


o 
H 


1 


fa 




Insane. 


























Physical : — 


























Dentition, 


3 


1 

_L 


A 
u x. 




1 


1 














Head injury, 


3 


O 

Z 





1 
1 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 




Indigestion, 


_ 


i 
1 


i 
1 




















Measles, . 


1 


x 


O 




_ 


— 


1 


- 


1 


- 


— 




Meningitis, 


3 









1 


1 














Rickets, . 


1 




1 




















Scarlet fever, 


1 


1 


2 




















Syphilis, 






i 
i 




















Vaccination, 


! 


- 


1 




















Whooping cough, 


1 




1 




















Alcohol, 




1 


2 




















Pneumonia, 


1 


- 


1 




















Hemorrhage of 


























navel after 


























birth, . 


1 




l 




















Totals, . 


18 


Q 


97 
z/ 


1 

1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 




Unknown, . 


40 


94 


fU 


4 


2 


6 


- 


2 


2 




- 




Totals, . 


58 


OO 


Ql 
y i 


r: 
O 


4 


9 


1 


3 


4 


_ 


_ 




Sane. 


























Physical : — 


























Alcohol, . 


1 


- 


1 




















Childbirth, 




1 


1 




















-r rignt, 


i 
l 


1 
1 


z 




















Head injury, 


5 


1 


6 




















Indigestion, 


4 




4 




















Meningitis, 


i 
i 


2 


3 




















Overwork, 


1 


- 


1 




















Traumatism, 


1 




i 
i 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 




Dentition, 


1 


_ 


1 




















Diphtheria, 


- 


1 


1 




















Totals, . 


15 


6 


21 








1 




1 








Unknown, . 


48 


40 


88 


11 


9 


20 


1 


1 


2 








Totals, . 


63 


46 


109 


11 


9 


20 


2 


1 


3 








Aggregates, . 


33 


15 


48 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


3 








Unknown, . 


88 


64 


152 


15 


11 


26 


1 


3 


4 








Aggregates, . 


121 


79 


200 


16 


13 


29 


3 


4 


7 









1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



CO I NMOOMOCOC5 
1-1 <M CM ^ CM 



CM I i-lfMi-Hr-HCOOOCO 
rH CM rH 



cm r - 

CO rH 



cm a> 

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CM 


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CO 






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t-h CM 


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CO 




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CM 






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CO O I O 



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rH | | | | | | | | 
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CO I I I I I I I I 
CO 



oo I I I I I I I I oo I 
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CO I 
CO 



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CM LO O O f2 
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o 

S 
CD 
> 
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48 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



rOTALS. 




CM I 

CO 


CO CO 
CO CO 


CM 


Oi i-H 

co 




CO 
lO 




00 1 1 
i—i 


CO 00 
1—1 1—1 


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CM 


CM CM 


CO 
CM 




'S3IBTAT 


CO CM I 
i— i 


00 00 

i—l i-H 




CO CO i—l 




CO 
CO 






tO T— | | 

CM 


CO CO 
CM CM 


00 


O 1 r-i 

CM 


i— 1 i-H 

CM CM 


1—t 


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*Q3Tt>TT73 T 


| | 

T— 1 




oo 


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o o 

i—l i-H 


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•spnoj, 


1 1 1 


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CO 


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CO 


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Ci CO 1 
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CM CM 
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TP 

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1 1 1 










1 1 1 






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1 1 1 






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d 
o 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 49 



11. — Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


J 
a 


Females. 


eg 

eS 


a 


Females. 


-2 


i 


Females. 


1 


Nervous system : — 




















Epileptic convulsion, . 


1 


1 


2 


3 


- 


3 


4 


1 


5 


Epilepsy, . . ... 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


Exhaustion from epilepsy, . 


2 


- 


2 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


3 




5 


3 


8 


2 


3 


5 


7 


6 


13 


Tiimnr nt nrniTi 

X Hill wi KJL Ul drill, . . . . 




- 






1 


1 




1 


1 


Respiratory system : — 




















Lobar pneumonia, 


— 


3 


3 


- 




- 


- 


3 


3 


Lobular pneumonia, 
• 


- 




- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


3 


3 


(Edema of lungs, 


- 




- 


1 




1 


1 




1 


Pulmonary apoplexy, . 


— 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Pulmonary oedema, 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, 




1 


1 




- 






1 


1 


T'libprcnl^r nnpnmnnia 

-L UUCl LUlal ^JllC LllllUllld, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 




_ 


_ 


1 


1 


Tuberculosis, .... 


1 




1 


- 




- 


1 




1 


Kjil OUldLUiy oyoLGIIl . — 
























1 


1 




- 






1 


1 


General : — 




















Acute peritonitis, 




2 


2 










2 


2 


Oirrhosi<=; of li vpr 








1 




1 


1 




1 


Asphyxia, ..... 








2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 


Totals, 


12 


14 


26 


11 


10 


21 


23 


24 


47 



50 



HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



[Dec. 



ALL OTHER ADMISSIONS. 


Whole Known 
Period op 
Hospital 
Residence. 


•s;**ox 


i I l I l ih i co eo«H 


OO 1 


00 o 

CO 




1 i 1 1 I i-h I CM CM i-h 


CO 1 


CD OS 

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CM I 


«« £ 


Whole Known Period 
of Disease. 


£ 

w 

H 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CM CM CO 


t- I"* 


OO CO 
CN 


•sajBaiaj 


1 t 1 1 1 I I < -a* CM CM 


U5 i- 


"° 8 
CM 






CM I 


CM i-h 


insanity. I 




1 »H | | | I CN CN CO | 


OO 1 


oo § 




1 1 1 1 1 1 r-t CM CO I 


CO 1 








CM | 


CM LT2 

Ob 


FIRST ADMITTED TO ANY HOSPITAL. 


Whole Duration of Attack. 


t» 

CO 
Cm 

m 
~ 

H 


•s[b;ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 i—i CO CO ■>* 


= 


00 CO 
•1 00 




1 1 1 1 1 1 i— CM i-h CO 




8 

182.57 




1 1 1 1 1 1 | io i-i 


t» CO 


10 

189.42 


INSANITY. 




| ^Hi-HCOCNi-ICOlOCN | 


00 1 


18 
54.83 


- S9JBUI3jJ 


1 1 1 1 i-H ~H CM CM CM I 
• 


OO 1 


00 CO 

oc 


sa^ 




O 1 


O CO 

CO 
CO 


Hospital 
Residence. 




I -Hi-iCOCNi-ieOifScN 1 


oo I 


18 

54.83 




1 1 1 I i-h i-h CM CM CM 1 


OO 1 


00 CO 








O CO 
rt CO 

CO 


Duration before Admission. 


| EPILEPSY. 








22 8 




1 1 1 1 1 i-H 1-1 If | 


1-1 


8 

124.28 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO CO i-H 




10 
145.71 


INSANITY. | 


•si^ox i » i i i i i i i i 


OO 1 


OO lO 




1 OO 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 


- ' 


00 us 




1 O 1 i I I I I | | 






PERIOD. 


Congenital, .... 
Under 1 month, . 
From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 
Over 20 years, 

Totals, .... 
Unknown, .... 

Totals, . 

Average of known cases (in 
months), .... 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 





co i co -*> 

1 - 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -H | 


CM 1 


CO -»< 


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CO 1 


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11,11,1111 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




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Congenital, .... 
Under 1 month, . 
From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 
Over 20 years, 

Totals 

Unknown, .... 

Totals 

Average of known cases (in 
months), .... 



Public Document No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Monson State Hospital 



(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1909. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1910. 



Public Document 



No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 

Monson State Hospital 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 

FOR THE 



Year exdixg ^November 30, 1909. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEE PEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1910. 



JAN 31 1921 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



l9o<f 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, .......... 5 

Trustees' Report, .......... 7 

Superintendent's Report, ......... 12 

General Information, ......... 22 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room, . . . .23 

Articles made and repaired on the Wards, ..... 25 

Articles made and repaired in the Industrial Room, . .26 
Farm Products, ........... 27 

List of Persons regularly employed, ...... 29 

Treasurer's Report, . . . . . . . . . .31 

Statistical Tables, .......... 39 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Monson State Hospital. 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM X. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman, .... Bostox. 

MABEL W. STEDMAN, Brookxixe. 

HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., Lenox. 

WALTER W. SCOFIELD. M.D.. Daltox. 

MARY P. TOWNSLEY, Sprixgfteld. 

JOHN BAP ST BLAKE, M.D., Secretary, .... Bostox. 

EDWARD P. BAGG, Holtoke. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

EVERETT FLOOD. M.D Superintendent. 

MORGAN B. HODSKINS, M.D Assistant Physician. 

EDWARD A. KENNEDY, M.D., . . Assistant Physician. 

ALDEN V. COOPER, M.D., . . . Assistant Physician. 

ANNIE E. TAFT, M.D., .... Research Officer, Assistant Phy- 

sicia n . 

FREDERICK W. GUILD. M.D Assistant Physician. 

CHARLES F. SLMONDS, .... Steward and Storekeeper. 
GEORGE E. BATES, Engineer. 



WALTER E. HATCH, .... Clerk and Treasurer. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

Dr. E. G. BRACKETT Consulting Orthopedic Surgeon. 



®l)c CommontDMltt) of ilta0socl)U0£tts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Monson State Hospital herewith re- 
spectfully present their eleventh annual report. 

After a service of six years as trustee, Mr. Winford X. 
Caldwell of Springfield, much to the regret of the other mem- 
bers of the Board, declines reappointment. He has been for 
some years the business member of the Board, and on his judg- 
ment and experience the trustees placed much reliance. His 
special knowledge, combined with his calm consideration of 
all subjects brought to his attention, rendered his opinions both 
valuable and weighty. 

In April Mr. Edward P. Bagg of Holyoke was appointed 
trustee. 

On the suggestion of the State Board of Insanity the name 
of our institution has been changed from the Massachusetts 
Hospital for Epileptics to the Monson State Hospital. This 
action was taken to bring about uniformity in the names of 
the State hospitals, and also to avoid any designation which 
could seem unpleasant to friends or relatives of the inmates. 

On the first of January, 1909, Dr. Annie E. Taft was ap- 
pointed as research officer and assistant physician. She had 
received training under Dr. Southard, pathologist of the State 
Board of Insanity, and has proved a valuable addition to the 
staff. 

Dr. Melvin E. Cowen, one of the assistant physicians, re- 
signed in May in order to enter private practice. Dr. Fred- 
erick W. Guild has been temporarily given his position. 

The senior assistant physician, Dr. Hodskins, has been 
granted leave of absence for some months in order to study in 
Europe. 



8 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



The general health of the inmates of the hospital has been 
good; there have been no epidemics and no serious health dis- 
turbances. 

Dr. Elliot G. Brackett, orthopedic surgeon to the hospital, 
has done much valuable work during the past year, chiefly 
operations on patients for deformities. Dr. Walter Weiser of 
Springfield and Dr. George A. Moore of Palmer have per- 
formed some surgical work for the hospital. Dr. William Drea 
did a large amount of dental work at the hospital during the 
summer and has given valuable instructions on this subject. 

A new system of bookkeeping has been instituted by the 
State Board of Insanity and the State Auditor, bringing the 
accounts into uniformity with those of the other State insti- 
tutions and facilitating comparisons. Mr. George L. Clark, 
who has acted as special accountant for the hospital for some 
years, has ceased to do this work, because it can now be done 
at the office of the State Auditor. 

The appropriations received from the Legislature during 
the past year have been as follows. In addition to the ordi- 
nary appropriations for current expenses we have received : — 

For the construction and furnishing of two dormitories for the 
accommodation of 75 children each, one for boys and one for 

girls, $84,000 

For the construction and furnishing of a service and adminis- 
tration building for the children's department, . . . 34,000 

For sewer, water and electric connections, .... 5,000 

The three buildings above mentioned together will consti- 
tute the children's department, which, when these buildings 
are completed, should accommodate 150 children. These build- 
ings are situated on the eastern slope of the western hills belong- 
ing to the hospital, and have been placed at such a distance 
from the buildings for the adults that communication between 
the adults and the children can be entirely prevented, and at the 
same time the superintendent can have suitable supervision 
over both groups. Above the buildings of the children's group, 
on the slope of the hill and near its top, is a beautiful wood, 
which we hope to use as a playground for the children. 

The management and organization of the children's group 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



have been the subject of long and earnest consideration. It 
seems probable that an assistant superintendent, under the di- 
rect supervision and orders of the superintendent, will be placed 
in charge of this group. The separation of the children from 
the adults is most important and under the present conditions 
can be easily carried out. 

We consider ourselves most fortunate in having at the pres- 
ent time a superintendent who has had a long and successful 
experience in caring for children of this class, and who has 
shown himself remarkably equipped for this form of work. It 
is hoped that the time will come before long when all age 
limitation shall cease and the hospital will be permitted to re- 
ceive children of any age. The admission of younger children 
will permit us to study more fully all forms of epilepsy, and we 
shall at least have the opportunity to treat patients before they 
have become confirmed invalids by long years of disease. The 
training of epileptic children can be better carried out if it is 
begun early and is in the hands of experts. 

For the coming year we ask for the following appropria- 
tions : — 

Extension of the sewer plant, $6,000 

Purchase of a special field, 740 

Construction of a cottage for women employees, . . . 2,000 

It is necessary to extend the sewer so that it may adequately 
care for the children's buildings. We desire also to make pro- 
visions for the surplus sewage from the present plant, and to 
connect herewith the buildings of the farm group. 

The field which we now desire to purchase is entirely sur- 
rounded by our own land. We have leased it for some years 
and find it useful to us. It will yield a good return for its 
price in pasturage. 

We have at present on hand an appropriation of $3,900 
which was granted for the purpose of finishing certain rooms 
in the basement of the women's south building and fitting them 
for sleeping rooms for women employees. We believe, how- 
ever, that these rooms are not especially suitable for this pur- 
pose, while they are most valuable to us for other uses, and we 



10 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



wish for an appropriation of $2,000, which may be added to the 
$3,900, with permission to apply the whole sum to the con- 
struction of a suitable cottage for female employees. 

In any institution of the size and character of this one there 
are always many purposes to which money can be usefully ap- 
plied, but the trustees feel that funds should only be asked for 
the more pressing and important needs, and more especially 
where a greater expense in the future can be saved. We have- 
therefore limited our requests to the sums and for the purposes 
stated above. 

The hospital has itself done considerable work during the 
year. A large portion of the surface of the ground under the- 
coal trestle has been concreted, so that the shovelling of the coal 
can be rendered easier and earth will not be mixed with the coal. 
This work will be completed next year. The coal trestle itself 
had become unsafe and this has been rebuilt by our carpenters. 

At Farm cottage the patients are building a shed 20 feet 
square and one story high, of old lumber, which when com- 
pleted will serve as a smoking room and place for games. 
These patients have also dug out the spring and made a large 
stone well about 16 feet deep. They have dug up all the old 
lead pipe and replaced it with galvanized-iron pipe. The atten- 
dants at Farm group have reshingled the roof of the building. 

The roof of the employees' cottage has been repaired, the 
shingles have been removed and replaced by slate. 

The large wooden piazza round the men's building has also 
been removed and replaced by concrete. At the greenhouse 
an additional house has been built especially for cucumbers; it 
is connected with the old building plant. 

The town of Monson has done a large amount of work in 
thoroughly macadamizing a piece of the road which runs from 
the town of Palmer directly to the hospital. We have been 
glad to aid in this work by means of furnishing stone crushed 
by our stone crusher. 

The research work of the hospital, under the charge of Dr. 
Taft, has acquired a firm foundation this year and there is an 
excellent prospect of valuable results. Dr. Taft will present 
a special report on her work. 

Cooper-Hewitt lights have been installed in the building for- 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



photography and some excellent colored photographs have been 
produced. We have also succeeded in obtaining some moving 
pictures which are likely to prove scientifically valuable. In 
this connection Dr. Walter G. Chase of Boston has kindly aided 
us and been of much service to the hospital. 

In conclusion, the trustees desire again to call attention to the 
great care required in the selection of employees, attendants and 
nurses. On the two latter classes depend, in great part, the 
immediate care and supervision of the patients, their health, 
their comfort and their happiness. We feel most strongly the 
sense of the responsibility of the officers, to whom belong the 
serious duties of appointing these subordinates, but we must 
point out that the difficulties in determining the reliability, the 
honesty, the good character and good temper of the applicants 
for and holders of these positions are very great. Constant care 
and watchfulness are required and the greatest discretion must 
be exercised. The cause and remedies for this condition have 
been spoken of in a previous report. 

WILLIAM X. BULLAED, Chairman, 

For the Trustees. 



* 



12 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year ending Nov, 
30, 1909. 

I am glad to report a year of prosperous work, with no serious 
troubles and in fact no complaints beyond the few which seem 
to be inevitable concomitants of work with nervous and diseased 
minds. The thought naturally suggests itself whether it is 
possible to so conduct affairs that there will be no complaints. 
Any one who has had experience in institution work will at once 
answer that such a Utopian state is not practicable in an institu- 
tion any more than it is in a family. Of course the next sug- 
gestion would be whether it cannot be more nearly approximated 
than is now done. To this question I think we may always 
give an affirmative answer. How to attain the point nearest the 
correct standard is what occupies all our waking hours. The 
routine work ought to be so conducted that this object will be in 
view all the time. The daily drudgery should never become so 
stereotyped that there is no pleasure in it. If all workers can 
so vary their work as to keep heart in it there is no danger of its 
going to seed and becoming nothing but work. Each one shoujd 
have a chance for independence to as large a degree as his 
capacity will allow. 

Some workers are always able to see something else to do for 
the welfare of the patient. Many can see nothing but what 
tradition points out. If a new line is suggested they claim that 
this has never been done before and ought not to be expected of 
them. This is what kills all enthusiasm, and such a person may 
generally drop out without detriment to the work ; though occa- 
sionally, by instruction, he becomes useful and fertile to a degree. 
The mere matter of salary is something of a consideration, but 
is far less than many other elements. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



13 



The whole success or failure of an individual in this kind of 
work seems to depend more upon his personality than upon any 
particular qualities. The whole make-up is what tells, and some 
persons will succeed while others fail. 

If we could get just the right persons for each position we 
would be at the point nearest perfection. So long as this is im- 
possible, and we have to keep trying to fit people into their posi- 
tions, only an approximately perfect result is reached. The 
greater the effort to get the right workers and to teach them, the 
greater the degree of success in the whole work. 

With epileptic patients there are especial difficulties and their 
attendants need particular instruction, often repeated. A life- 
time of conscientious labor in this field hardly fits even the best 
adapted to do all that ought to be done; but certainly no one can 
fail to gain something if he tries to learn from those of experi- 
ence and if his heart is in the work. The success at this hospital 
in these matters is well worth a favorable comment, and to the 
worker in each ward and to the one almost alone in a department 
praise is largely due. If complaints and troubles come we can 
usually see how some individual, by tact and kindness, might 
have avoided them ; and. in the same way. it seems to me demon- 
strable that these individuals in our work are the ones who 
should receive special credit if all does go smoothly. 

This only further establishes the fact, long since recognized, 
that our main problem is to find satisfactory helpers to care for 
patients. 

The trials and difficulties with patients are sometimes very 
prominent, though there are generally some successes to lighten 
the burden. Generally the whole number of persons who are 
really very trying on any day can be reckoned on the fingers 
of one hand, and if we stop to count our blessings, it is not so 
hard to handle the few troubles coming at any one time under 
normal conditions. 

Play, work, study, treatment have been introduced as fully 
as possible so as to take the place of mere drug treatment, — the 
plan in general being to reduce this last to a minimum. 

The material progress of our institution has been also satis- 
factory. The usual repairs and improvements have been at- 
tended to in an economical manner. Besides these some extraor- 



14 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



dinary repairs have been possible and have added considerably 
to the value of our plant. 

The State Highway Commission has made a survey of the 
road from Palmer to our south building. The town of Monson 
has done the work and the hospital has furnished the crushed 
stone to macadamize about half a mile of this. It is probable 
that the remaining portion will be handled in the same way dur- 
ing the coming season. 

In the medical work constant effort has been put forth to 
improve the condition of the patients, and a fair degree of suc- 
cess has been reached. With the advanced cases a small per- 
centage of recoveries is all that we can hope for ; but among the 
much improved we are to list a very large percentage. This 
nearly always means that the patients, though well here so far 
as epileptic seizures are concerned, would not remain so if taken 
back to the surroundings from which they came. The advantage 
in thus keeping even a single patient free from these harrowing 
attacks cannot be overestimated, and as we consider that a large 
number are thus kept we find encouragement in this work. 

There has been only one change during the year in the list of 
our medical officers. 

The appropriation of the last Legislature was granted in one 
sum, though it was divided into four parts. The total amount 
was $123,000. With this we are to carry out the plan of estab- 
lishing a group for the accommodation of children, with especial 
reference to their school needs. 

The plan comprises three buildings : one for the service build- 
ing, furnishing rooms for the workers, and one dormitory for 75 
girls and another for 75 boys. The appropriation also includes 
connecting these buildings with the mains of sewer, water, elec- 
tric light and telephone. Each building has a separate heating 
plant. The service building has a low-pressure steam boiler to 
heat the building and to supply steam for the kitchen work, 
and each dormitory has a hot-water apparatus for heating the 
house. 

The hot-water supply is provided for each building by a sepa- 
rate tank heater. This arrangement gives each building control 
of its own heating, and avoids cutting trenches from one build- 
ing to another through the ledge, which comes near the surface 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



15 



of the ground in many places. If we were furnishing power or 
high-pressure steam this would not be advisable, but the problem 
is a different one from that we meet in our main plant. We 
especially desire to have it possible to heat the day rooms during 
damp and cold mornings in the summer and mornings and even- 
ings during the fall and spring months. By this arrangement a 
few sticks of wood in the furnace will be sufficient to warm the 
water in the heating system and take the chill off the rooms when 
necessary. This method has already been sufficiently tested at 
our Farm group to make us feel certain of its practical working. 

This whole provision for the care of children seems an admir- 
able beginning of visible results of the years of study which 
your Board has given to this problem. Though epilepsy in 
children is far from hopeful, much can be done and many lines 
of research will be possible so that eventually a much larger 
percentage of recoveries may be attained. 

Changes were made by the last Legislature relating to the 
forms of admission to this hospital, so that we now have admis- 
sions, as formerly, of the insane, private if the family is able to 
pay the minimum rate of $5 per week, otherwise wholly public 
or reimbursed through the State Board by such amounts as the 
family is able to assume, and the voluntary commitments, which 
may be private or public in the same way. There is also a pro- 
vision by which a person who is merely dangerous by reason of 
epilepsy may be committed, though sane. 

I here incorporate Dr. Taft's statement as to her work, with 
the list of autopsies somewhat in detail. The research work at 
the hospital has been carried on under the direction of Dr. E. E. 
Southard, pathologist to the State Board of Insanity. The first 
undertaking was the equipment of a laboratory for pathological 
work. Material from the trunk organs, secured at autopsies on 
epileptic patients, was gathered from several of the State hos- 
pitals, notably Danvers, Dr. E. E. Southard, pathologist ; Taun- 
ton, Dr. C. J. McGaffin, pathologist ; Worcester, Dr. T. A. Hoch, 
pathologist, and Westborough, Dr. S. W. Fuller, pathologist. 

A series of 60 cases, including also those from this hospital, 
has been examined microscopically, and from these the findings 
in 50 cases have been tabulated, to show the relative occurrence 
of various essential or complicating pathological factors in epi- 



16 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



lepsy. These results have already been presented at the patho- 
logical colloquium, Harvard Medical School, Dec. 2, 1909. This 
work has also suggested several new lines of research, by reason 
of the preponderance of liver and kidney lesions. 

In addition a detailed study of Brown Sequard's guinea pig 
epilepsy has been carried on with numerous animals. This work 
is not yet completed. For the information of any who may have 
scruples as to the use of animals for experimental work, I may 
say that no animals are operated upon without an anaesthetic, 
and that in general an operation of any kind is not necessary to 
carry out the experiments we do. 

Considerable study of the literature along the lines of hered- 
ity, neurology and special pathology has been included. 

Post-mortem examinations have been made on 32 cases during 
the current year, the gross findings on which follow : — 

No. 808. — Male. Autopsy Dec. 7, 1908. Pleuritis (old) ; pulmonary 
tuberculosis; oedema of lungs. 

No. 1314. — Female. Autopsy Dec. 15, 1908. (Edema of lungs ; hy- 
peremia of spleen. 

No. 315. — Male. Autopsy Dec. 31, 1908. Acute dilatation of the 
heart. 

No. 1330. — Female. Autopsy Jan. 15, 1909. Congestion and oedema 
of the lungs ; bronchial lymphnoditis. 

No. 1376. — Male. Autopsy Jan. 25, 1909. Cerebral atrophy and 
sclerosis ; enlarged bronchial glands. 

No. 865. — Female. Autopsy Jan. 27, 1909. Internal hydrocephalus. 
No. 

No. 1334. — Male. Autopsy March 3, 1909. Cerebral sclerosis ; men- 
ingitis (old) ; cloudy swelling of kidneys; hypostatic congestion of lungs. 

No. 568. — Male. Autopsy March 26, 1909. Chronic nephritis; 
oedema of lungs; chronic gastritis. 

No. 653. — Male. Autopsy March 18, 1909. Lobar pneumonia. 

No. 977. — Male. Autopsy March 28, 1909. Chronic interstitial 
nephritis. 

No. 1300. — Male. Autopsy April 8, 1909. Pulmonary tuberculosis 
and oedema; chronic endocarditis; acute aortic endocarditis; chronic in- 
terstitial nephritis. 

No. 706. — Male. Autopsy April 10, 1909. Pulmonary tuberculosis 
and oedema; atheroma of aorta; chronic nephritis; chronic cystitis. 

No. 1399. — Female. Autopsy April 11, 1909. Pulmonary tubercu- 
losis ; chronic plenritis ; focal peritonitis ; tuberculous ulcers of small in- 
testine; chronic peri-appendicitis; chronic hepatitis; chronic tuberculous 
nephritis; cerebro-spinal oedema. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



17 



No. 174. — Male. Autopsy April 14, 1909. Embolism of pulmonary 
artery (?); oedema of lungs; chronic pleuritis; chronic typhlitis; ab- 
scess of kidneys ; pyelo-nephritis ; cystitis ; orchitis ; atheroma of aorta. 

No. 293. — Male. Autopsy April 30, 1909. Healed pulmonary 
tuberculosis; chronic pleuritis; cholecystitis; chronic interstitial 
nephritis; cystitis; arteriosclerosis; cerebral hemorrhage. 

No. 962. — Male. Autopsy May 6, 1909. Multiple bronchiectatic 
abscesses; chronic pleuritis; pleural effusion; acute pericarditis; cardiac 
hypertrophy ; multiple abscesses of myocardium; endocardium, liver, 
spleen, kidney, colon and lymph nodes; multiple decubitus; abscesses 
of cerebral cortex with focal meningitis. 

No. 406. — Male. Autopsy May 10, 1909. Pulmonary tuberculosis 
and oedema; right pleural effusion; mesenteric lymphnoditis ; dorsal 
scoliosis ; decubitus. 

No. 743. — Female. Autopsy May 17, 1909. Pulmonary tuberculosis 
and oedema; acute bronchilitis ; chronic focal peritonitis; small cyst 
of kidney; slight internal hydrocephalus, right; left hemiplegia. 

No. 122. — Female. Autopsy May 24, 1909. Pulmonary tubercu- 
losis; chronic pleuritis; chronic hepatitis; chronic appendicitis; chronic 
peri-appendicitis; chronic peritonitis; chronic interstitial nephritis, 
multiple contusions; hypoplasia of right occipital lobe; cerebral 
hemorrhage. 

Xo. 1124. — Male. Autopsy July 14, 1909. Multiple bronchiectatic 
abscesses; pulmonary oedema; left chronic pleuritis; acute fibrous peri- 
carditis; chronic perisplenitis; slight atheroma of aorta; slight subpial 
oedema. 

Xo. 702. — Male. Autopsy July 12, 1909. General anasarca, aortic 
stenosis and regurgitation with mitral regurgitation; pulmonary 
oedema; right chronic pleuritis; bronchial lymphnoditis; congested 
spleen; hour-glass stomach; submucous intestinal hemorrhages; chronic 
hepatitis; slight chronic diffuse nephritis; atheroma and calcification 
of the aorta ; left inguinal hernia ; oedema of brain and cord. 

No. 1748. — Male. Autopsy Aug. 9, 1909. Chronic interstitial kera- 
titis with pterygium; hypostatic congestion of lungs; chronic pleuritis; 
slight oedema of right lung; calcified nodule on mitral valve with mitral 
stenosis; milk patch on visceral pericardium; congestion, submucous 
hemorrhage and ulceration of ileum; ulceration of ileocecal valve; 
chronic hepatitis; double adrenal hemorrhage; slight diffuse nephritis; 
antero-posterior and lateral curvature of dorsal spine; contracture of 
the left knee; focus of hemorrhagic softening in right cerebral hemi- 
sphere, including portions of the optic thalamus and corpus striatum, 
extending out over the Island of Reil; chronic external hemorrhagic 
pachymeningitis of dorsal cord, with softening of underlying segments. 

No. 180. — Female. Autopsy Aug. 17, 1909. Bronchiectatic ab- 
scesses; chronic pleuritis; chronic gastritis; acute dilatation of the 
stomach; transverse .colon contracted in its transverse diameter; der- 



IS 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



moid cyst of left ovary; atrophic right ovary; decubitus over right 
gluteal region and sacrum; slight subpial cedema. 

Xo. 1753. — Male. Autopsy Sept. 17, 1909. General malnutrition ; 
milk patch on visceral pericardium ; beginning broncho pneumonia. 

No. 636. — Female. Autopsy Sept. 20, 1909. General malnutrition ; 
abscess of lung; congestion of spleen; chronic diffuse nephritis; multiple 
decubitus. 

Xo. 973. — Female. Autopsy Sept. 27, 1909. Cardiac hypertrophy ; 
acute pericarditis; hydro-pericardium; chronic pleuritis; pleural effu- 
sion; gastroptosis ; ascites; chronic interstitial splenitis; chronic diffuse 
nephritis ; acute cystitis ; hypostatic congestion of lungs, with some 
cedema of right lower lobe; cedema of face and extremities; chronic 
focal lepto meningitis. 

Xo. 1247. — Male. Autopsy Oct. 2, 1909. Malnutrition; dilatation 
of the stomach: fecal concretions in appendix; chronic peritonitis; 
pleural effusion; hypostatic congestion of lungs; atheroma of aorta; 
porencephaly left cerebral hemisphere. 

Xo. 1098. — Male. Autopsy Oct. 10, 1909. Acute pericarditis; 
cedema and hypostatic congestion of lungs. 

Xo. 1103. — Male. Autopsy Oct. 12, 1909. Acute lobar pneumonia 
(massive): acute pleuritis: congested spleen; dilated stomach; chronic 
appendicitis; slight mesenteric lymphnoditis ; chronic aortitis. 

Xo. 1201. — Female. Autopsy Oct. 30. 1909. Chronic pleuritis; 
hydropericardium ; ascites; peri-cystitis; chronic diffuse nephritis, with 
abscess of right kidney. 

No. 452. — Female. Autopsy Oct. 31. 1909. Chronic pleuritis left 
lung: cholelithiasis. 

Xo. 1792. — Male. Autopsy Xov. 26, 1909. Chronic endocarditis ; 
hypertrophied heart ; atheroma of aorta : chronic splenitis ; renal cyst. 

Xo. 999. — Male. Autopsy Xov. 28, 1909. Double hallux valgus; 
chronic peri-appendicitis: congestion and cedema of lungs; acute bron- 
chiolitis: congested liver and chronic hepatitis; atheroma of aorta 
(slight). 

Clekgymex who have held Service. 

Rev. William Hart. 



Rev. George A. Andrews. 
Rev. F. S. Brewer. 
Rev. Abram Conklin. 
Rev. Francis W. Gibbs. 
Rev. Charles Hill. 



Rev. H. W. Smith. 

Rev. C. J. Sniffen. 

Rev. Charles W. Williams. 



Amusements. 

Dances, 56 ; masquerade, 1 ; moving pictures, 8 ; excursions to 
lake, 28: excursions to fair, 2; dancing school, 28; physical 
culture classes, 25 ; entertainments, 3. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 19 



GlFTS. 



Name. 


Place. 


Article. 


Mr. F. F. Marcy 




Reading matter. 


Mrs. L. Purtell 




Presents for Christmas rree. 


M iss Nellie Cotter, 


Roxbury 


Clothing. 


Mrs. J. A. Conroy, 


Roxbury, .... 


Clothing. 


Mr. Dennis F. Lyons, . 


Marlborough, 


Clothing. 


Lynde & Gould 


Palmer, .... 


Calendars. 


Mr. T. W.Main 


Springfield, 


Calendars and magazines. 


Mr. J. L. Shaw, .... 


Springfield, 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Elizabeth Rumrell, 


Boston 


Clothing. 


Miss M. E. Kilduff, 


Springfield, . • . 


M agazines. 


D. E. Marcy 




Reading matter. 


Mrs. Hinchey, .... 


Palmer, .... 


Reading matter. 


Mrs. Xorthup 




Reading matter. 




Xew York, X. Y.. 


Clothing and Easter cards. 


Mrs. B. B. Read, . .-" 


Fall River, 


Clothing. 


Miss Margaret O'Donnell, 


Dalton, .... 


Xorth Adams daily paper. 


Mrs. W. H. Pease 




Reading matter. 


Mr. B. S. Atwood 


Whitman 


Clothing. 


Mrs. E. F. Fales, . 


San Diego, Cal.. 


Clothing and games. 


Rev. 0. W. Foye 


Torrington, Conn., . 


Clothing. 


Mrs. L. J. Yaughan, . . ! 


Xew Bedford, . 


Clothing. 


Rev. Abram Conklin. . 


Monson, 


Magazines. 




Monson 


Books and magazines. 


Mr. Everett Carpenter, 


Palmer, 


Magazines. 


Mrs. L. E. Chandler. . 




Magazines. 



Table showing Patients employed and in What Way. 



Men. 



Administration building. 

Bakery. 

Barn, 

Carpenter, . 
Dining room. 
Employees' cottage, 
Engineers' department, 
Farm, .... 
Garden, 
Greenhouse. 



1 
S 

12 
1 

2-4 
1 
2 

1 

13 



Women. 



19 

3 



20 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 

Table showing Patients employed and in What Way — Concluded. 



Men. Women. 



Industrial building, 


• 16 


- 


Kitchen, 


19 


25 


Laundry, 


11 


61 


Mason, 


2 


- 


Music, 




1 






rt 


On roads, 


37 




Painter, 


5 




Printer, 


1 




School, 


6 


30 


Sewing room, . 




46 


Store, 


4 




Ward work, 


139 


93 


With yard man, 


23 






333 


287 



Operations. 

Plastic operation and tenotomy for chronic flexed fingers, 2. 

Tenotomy for chronic flexion of wrist, 1. 

Tenotomy, equino- varus, 1. 

Divergency of eyes, 1. 

Wiring of fractured femur, 1, 

Perineal operation for stricture of urethra. 

Tonsilotomies, 12. 

Trephining, 1. 

Circumcisions, 7. 

Curettage, 26. 

Convergency of the eyes, 3. 

Hemorrhoids, 1. 

Varicocele, 1. 

List of Graduates. 



Names. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Fannie C. Cronin, . 


1901 


Monson State Hospital, supervisor, 


Palmer. 


Mary E. Kilduff, . 


1901 


Private nursing 


Springfield. 


Emma S. McKeever, 


1901 


Matron at State Farm, . 


State Farm. 


Julia O'Brien, . 


1901 


Private nursing, .... 


22 Kenilworth Street, 




Roxbury. 


Edith E. Townsend, 


1901 


Married 


Bragville, Me. 


Carroll W. Briggs, . 


1902 


Boston City Hospital, . 


Boston. 


A.M. D. Manwarring, 


1902 




Averill Park, X. Y. 


Edwin S. Manwarring, . 


1902 




Averill Park, X. Y. 


James L. McKeever, 


1902 


State Farm 


State Farm. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 21 

List of Graduates — Concluded. 



Names. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Walter L. McKeever, 


1902 




Middletown, Conn. 


Hattie Edith Rowe, 


1902 




Georgetown, Me. 


Alice B. Smith, 


1902 


Bookkeeping, .... 


Medford. 


Marguerite Casey, . 


1903 


Private nursing, .... 


Burlington, Vt. 


Catherine Daley, 


1903 


Connecticut Hospital for Insane, . 


Middletown, Conn. 


Georgie A. Nute, 


1903 


Stamford Hall 


Stamford, Conn. 


George J. Flint, 


1903 




Palmer. 


Mea D. Brown, 


1905 




Portland, Me. 


Annie A. Caldwell, . 


1905 


Private nursing, .... 


Springfield. 


Louis A. Fontaine, . 


1905 




Palmer. 


Frank L. Morway, . 
Christine McClellan, 


1905 
1906 


Apothecary at Monson State Hos- 
pital. 

Married, 


Palmer. 

Prince Edward Island. 


Lutie F. Cambell, . 
Theresa A. Brown, . 


1907 
1907 


Assistant supervisor, Monson State 
Hospital. 


Palmer. 


Mary G. Hancock, . 


1907 


Private nursing, .... 


Holyoke. 


Mrs. Anna Woodward, 


1907 




Syracuse, N. Y. 


Elizabeth McCarthy, 
Samuel E. Chase, 


1907 
1907 


Assistant supervisor, Monson State 

Hospital. 
Brattleborough Retreat, nurse, 


Palmer. 

Brattleboro, Vt. 


William L. Paine, . 


1907 


Nurse, Monson State Hospital, 


Palmer. 


Edith M. Brooks, . 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Boston. 


Eva G. Caldwell, . 


1908 




Woodstock, N. B. 


Mary J. Caldwell, . 


1908 


Private nursing 


Woodstock, N. B. 


Susan E. Crumb, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Daisy I. Dowling, . 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Brockton. 


011a G. Dowling, . 


1908 




Brockton. 


Dora L. Jacques, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Presque Isle, Me. 


Agnes M. Millen, 


1908 




Syracuse, N. Y. 


Anna L. Millen, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Salem. 


Katherine C. Murray, 


1908 




Dorchester. 


Mae P. Leeman, 


1908 


Nurse, Monson State Hospital, 


Palmer. 


Nellie F. Brown, 


1909 




Palmer. 


Mary S. Campbell, . 


1909 


Nurse, Monson State Hospital, 


Palmer. 


Katherine C. Donovan, . 


1909 


Nurse, Monson State Hospital, 


Palmer. 


Ermina E. Drennan, 


1909 


Nurse, Monson State Hospital, 


Palmer. 



The nurses have worked away from the hospital 282 days. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

EVEKETT FLOOD, 

I ~ 



22 



MOXSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



The name of the institution is now the Monson State Hospital. 

Methods of Admission. 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the 
insane hospitals. 

2. Voluntary cases, either public or private, with the certifi- 
cate of one doctor, but no judge. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. Pa- 
tients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out alone. 
They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to bed early. 
These restrictions are not irksome when they are fully under- 
stood. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much the 
same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 
one mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the ad- 
dress for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany rail- 
road, between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the junction 
of the Boston & Albany and the New London Northern division 
of the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch of the Boston 
& Albany railroad has one terminus in Palmer, the other in Win- 
chendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, and the railroad fare 
is $1.70. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



23 



ARTICLES MADE AXD REPAIRED IN THE 
SEWING ROOM. 



Made. 




Laundry bags, 


. 63 


Aprons, .... 


494 


Mittens, pairs, 


. 546 


Aprons, mangle, . 


7 


Mattress protectors. 


. 78 


Art squares, . 


2 


Night gowns, long. 


. 210 


Boys' blouses, 


15 


Night gowns, short. 


. 261 


Burial robes, . 


9 


Napkins, 


. 228 


Burial drawers, pairs, . 


12 


Night shirts, . 


. 127 


Burial napkins, pairs, . 


12 


Nurses' caps, . 


. 26 


Burial chemise, 


12 


Operating towels, . 


'. 84 


Bibs, : 


114 


Overalls, pairs, 


. 70 


Belts, .... 


11 


Petticoats, long, 


. 106 


Bathing caps, 


31 


Petticoats, short, . 


. 188 


Bureau scarfs, 


. 132 


Pin cushions, . 


3 


Coats, .... 


136 


Piano cover, . 


1 


Corset covers, 


100 


Pillow slips, . 


. 73 


Canvas aprons, 


12 


Pillow ticks, . 


. 34 


Canvas box cover, 


1 


Rugs, .... 


. 82 


Chemises, 


. 215 


Rubber apron, 


1 


Cheese cloth covers, 


12 


Rubber pillow slips. 


6 


Curtains, 


. 122 


Shirt waists, . 


. 31 


Clothes-pin bags, . 


4 


Suspenders, pairs, . 


. 171 


Collar bag, 


1 


Skirts, .... 


9 


Corset waists, . 


3 


Shirts, .... 


. 12 


Dresses, 


515 


Straps for curtains, 


6 


Denim pants, pairs, 


19 


Suits, .... 


7 


Denim coat, . 


1 


Sheets, .... 


. 17 


Dish towels, . 


537 


Table cloths, . 


. 142 


Dusters, .... 


56 


Table napkins, dozen, . 


3 


Drawers, pairs, 


134 


Tray cloths, . 


. 68 


Dressing sacks, 


8 


Trousers, pairs, 


. 161 


Flags, .... 


8 


Towels, .... 


. 1,243 


Garters, pairs, 


229 


Towels, roller, 


. 845 


Gymnasium suits, . 


12 


Ties, . . . . 


6 


Gymnasium pants, pairs, 


17 


Toilet napkins, dozen, . 


. 70i 


Holders, .... 


24 


Union suits, . 


. 65 


Instrument cases, . 


2 


Vests, .... 


. 20 



24 MONSOX STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



Repaired. 




Mittens, pairs, 


3 


Aprons, .... 


. 123 


Night shirts, 


89 


Bibs, .... 


82 


Night gowns, long, 


145 


Blouses, .... 


38 


Night gowns, short, 


168 


Bedspreads, 


28 


Overcoat, 


1 


Blankets, 


25 


Overalls, pairs, 


129 


Bath robes, 


2 


Pillow slips, 


80 


Coats, .... 


347 


Petticoats, 


19 


Clothes bags, . 


24 


Pajamas, 


35 


Corset covers, 


18 


Rugs, .... 

o J .... 


28 


Chemises, 


23 


Shirts, .... 


. 571 


Drawers, 


581 


Sheets, .... 


45 


Dresses, .... 


156 


Sweaters, 


4 


Dresses (new sleeves), . 


41 


Shoulder blankets, 


12 


Discarding bags, . 


7 


Skirts, .... 


14 


Flags, .... 


2 


Table cloths, . 


27 


Gloves, pairs, 


2 


Trousers, pairs, 


845 


Gymnasium pants, pairs, 


1 


Towels, .... 


86 


Hose, pairs, . 


. 3,690 


Typewriter cover, . 


1 


Handkerchiefs, 


5 


Tying jacket, 


1 


Jersey, .... 


1 


Undershirts, . 


. 219 


Jumpers, 


24 


Union suits, . 


53 


Laundry bags, 


4 


Vests, .... 


53 


Mattress protectors, 


13 


Wrappers, 


22 


Mail bag, 


1 







1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT - No. 62. 



25 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED ON 
THE WARDS. 



Repaired. 




Pillow slips, 


5 


Aprons, .... 


97 


Pants, pairs, . 


. 1,312 


Bibs, .... 


. 335 


Shirts, .... 


. 1,163 


Blankets, 


56 


Suspenders, pairs, . 


20 


Barber chair covers, 


2 


Slippers, pairs, 


5 


Bedspreads, . 


29 


Table cloth, . 


1 


Coats, .... 


599 


Union suits, . 


37 


Cloth bags, 


2 


Vests, .... 


. 126 


Drawers, pairs, 


611 






Hose, pairs, . 


28 


Made. 




Gymnasium pants, pairs, 


2 


Barber aprons, 


2 


Laundry bags, 


13 


Coats, .... 


5 


Mattress covers, 


99 


Suspenders, pairs, . 


. 195 


Night shirts, . 


12 







26 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



A T A T\ T7* 

iVIADE. 




JtvEPAIRED. 




Awnings, 


9 


Barber chair, . 


1 


Blackboard, erasers, 


Q 
O 


Baseball mittens, pairs, 


3 


Coat hangers, 


O'J 


Boots, pairs, . 


3 


Envelopes, pill, 




Couch, .... 


1 


v ciupcft, ltiige, uiiiLc, 


1 3^0 


Crutches, pair, 


1 


TTammpr handlps 


3 


LJiairs, .... 


65 


Laundry mangles sewn, 


4 


Fire escape, 


1 




18 


Floor pillows, 


2 


T^ucs ronp 


33 


Gloves, men's, pairs, 


o 

3 


Shoes, men's, pairs, 


356 


Hall curtain eyeletted, 


1 


S^li nnprc; m pit's ■nail's 


303 


Hassock, 


1 






Harness, parts, 


10 






Mail bags, 


2 


R 1 n n li" « 


51,125 


Morris chair cushion, 


1 


Fin vpI nnps 


1,880 


Mattresses, 


210 


Names 


56 


Office paper holders, 


A 

4 


N^otp hparta hovps 


Q 


-TlllOWS, .... 


4o3 


Postal pfirds 


250 


Rugs, .... 


7 


Programs, essays, rules, etc., 


1,305 


T? q vr^r* clrnnc 
XVdAOI ablOpb, . 


Q 
O 


Carved. 




Stools, camp, . 


16 




Stool, foot, 


1 


Cemetery head marks, . 


10 


Shoes, pairs, . 


. 1,744 


Sign and door plates, . 


20 


Shoes marked, pairs, 


79 






Screens, .... 


8 


Cut. 




Suit case, 


1 


Coats, work, . 


89 


Umbrellas, 


106 


Coats, summer, 


88 


Hair for mattresses and 


pillows 


Mittens, dozen, pairs, . 


56 


picked and cleansed. 




Overalls, work, pairs, . 


88 






Pants, work, pairs, 


176 






Suits, work, .... 


8 






Vests, work, .... 


15 







1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



FARM PRODUCTS. 

From Dec. 1, 1908, to Dec. 1, 1909. 



Apples, eating, 289 bushels, at $3, $867 00 

Apples, cider, 386 bushels, at $0.15, 87 90 

Apples, crab, 2 bushels, at $1, 2 00 

Beans, dry, 10 bushels, at $3.30, 33 00 

Beans, string, 227^ bushels, at $1, 227 50 

Beans, shell, 57 barrels, at $1.25, 71 25 

Beets, 139 bushels, at $0.50, 69 50 

Beet greens, 14 bushels, at $0.35, 4 90 

Beef, 1,413 pounds, at $0.08, 113 04 

Cabbage, 13| tons, at $20, 268 00 

Carrots, 362 bushels, at $0.60, . 217 20 

Calves sold, 29, 74 50 

Cucumbers, 37 boxes, at $2, 74 00 

Corn, sweet, 708 bushels, at $0.75, 531 00 

Corn, husked, 812 bushels, at $0.75, 609 00 

Currants, 70 quarts, at. $0.11, 7 70 

Ensilage, 300 tons, at $5, 1,500 00 

Fodder, dry, 125 tons, at $5, 625 00 

Fodder, green, 240 tons, at $12, 2,880 00 

Grapes, 50 pounds, at $0.03, 1 50 

Hay, 300 tons, at $18, 5,400 00 

Hay, bog, 5 tons, at $10, 50 00 

Hay, meadow, 18 tons, at $10, 180 00 

Hay, oat, 40 tons, at $10, . . . . . . . 400 00 

Hides sold, 13 OS 

Lettuce, 265^ boxes, at $0.75, 201 00 

Lumber, 421 18 

Milk, 288,221 quarts, at $0.05, 14,411 05 

Onions, 354 bushels, at $0.85, 300 90 

Parsnips, 297 bushels, at $0.75, 222 75 

Peas, 39^ bushels, at $1, 39 50 

Peppers, 6 bushels, at $0.75, 4 50 

Potatoes, 510 bushels, at $0.95, 484 50 



Amount carried forward, $30,392 45 



28 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL, [Dec. 

Amount brought forward, $30,392 45 

Pears, 3 bushels, at $1.75, 5 25 

Pork, 6,095 pounds, at $0.05, 306 72 

Posts, 225, at $1, 225 00 

Poles, telephone, 80 00 

Radishes, 52 dozen bunches, at $0.25, 13 00 

Radish, horse, 2 bushels, at $1, 2 00 

Rhubarb, 1,578} pounds, at $0.02, 31 57 

Squash, summer, 48} pounds, at $1, 48 50 

Squash, winter, 7 T 9 o tons, at $30, 237 00 

Sleepers, 50, at $0.25, 12 50 

Tomatoes, ripe, 97 bushels, at $0.75, 72 75 

Tomatoes, green, 141} bushels, at $0.50, 70 75 

Turnips, 153 barrels, at $1.25, 191 25 

Wood, 250 cords, at $4.50, 1,125 00 

Wool sold, 31 03 

Manure, 730 cords, at $6, 4,380 00 



$37,224 77 

Greenhouse Products. 

Asparagus, 3 boxes, at $4.25, $12 75 

Cauliflower, 30 boxes, at $1, . . ' 30 00 

Cucumbers, 2 boxes, at $2, 4 00 

Celery, 292 boxes, at $0.85, 248 20 

Lettuce, 75f boxes, at $0.75, 57 75 

Chickens, 159 pounds, at $0.22, 34 98 

Eggs, 306 dozen, at $0.35, 107 10 

Fowl, 287 pounds, at $0.15, 43 05 

Plums, 8 baskets, at $0.30, 2 40 

Spinach, 22 bushels, at $0.35, 7 70 

Strawberries, 323 quarts, at $0.08, 25 84 

Tomatoes, ripe, 64 bushels, at $0.75, 48 00 

Tomatoes, green, 30} bushels, at $0.50, 15 25 

Rhubarb, 25 pounds, at $0.02, 50 

Bulbs, plants, flowers, etc., 4,476 00 



$5,113 52 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



29 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at Monsox State Hospital. 



Superintendent, per year, . 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Assistant physician, per year, 
Pathologist, per year, . . 
Steward, per year, 
Engineer, per year, 
Clerk and treasurer, per year, 
Stenographer, per month, . 
Clerks (2), per month, 
Supervisors (women, 2), per month, 
Assistant supervisor, per month, 
Supervisor (man), per month, . 
Supervisor (man), per month, . 
Assistant supervisors (men, 2), per month, 
Night nurses (women, 8), per month, 
Nurses (women, 25), per month, 
Night nurses (men, 8), per month, 
Nurses (men, 30), per month, . 
Assistant engineer, per week, 
Assistant engineer, per month, . 
Assistant engineers (2), per day, 
Firemen (3), per day, . 
Baker, per month, 
Kitchen men (3), per month, 
Store assistants (3), per month, 



$3,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
1,000 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 
1,000 00 
30 00 
30 00 
$25 00-40 00 
35 00 
50 00 
35 00 
$35 00-37 00 
20 00-30 00 
20 00-30 00 
25 00-35 00 
25 00-35 00 
14 25 
35 00 
SI 50-2 00 
1 50-1 85 
60 00 
$25 00-30 00 
30 00-34 00-40 00 



30 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 

Cooks (5), per month, $27 00-38 00 

Assistant cooks (10), per month, 18 00-20 00 

Table girls (4), per month, 18 00-20 00 

Assistant seamstresses (5), per month, .... 16 00-18 00 

Laundress, per month, . • . . . ... . . 22 00 

Assistant laundresses (5), per month, .... $16 00-18 00 

Farmer, per annum, 900 00 

Assistant farmers (18), per month, $23 00-35 00 

Head carpenter, per day, 3 00 

Assistant carpenters (2), per day, 2 50 

Painters (2), per day, $2 25-2 50 

Mason, per month, 65 00 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



31 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 

T respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1909 : — 



Cash Account. 



Balance Dec. 1, 1908, 



$2,966 30 



Receipt* 



Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 
Private, 

Reimbursements, 
Cities and towns, 
Soldiers' relief, 

Sales: — 
Food, 

Clothing and materials, 
Furnishings, 

Repairs and improvements, 
Miscellaneous, 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Cows and calves, 
Hides, 
Vegetables, 
Use of teams, 
Sundries, . 

Miscellaneous receipts: — 

Interest on bank balances, 
Sundries, . 



$8,680 23 
3,493 41 
13,838 88 
42 25 



$399 54 
243 03 
18 28 
292 72 
25 50 



$74 50 
13 08 
7 25 
4 00 
176 39 



$196 65 
35 36 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 1908, .... 
Advance money, .... 
Approved schedules of 1909, 

Special appropriations, .... 



$26,054 



79 07 



275 22 



232 01 



$4,735 89 
10,000 00 
149,220 3S 



27,541 01 



163,956 27 
34,566 56 



Total 



$229,030 20 



32 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec, 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1908, 
Eleven months' schedules, 1909, . 
November advances, ..... 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules ($34,566.56, less advances 

of November, 1908, $240), 
November advances, ..... 

Balance Nov. 30, 1909: — 

In bank, ....... 

In office, ....... 



$27,541 07 

7,942 19 
149,220 38 
8,160 19 



$34,326 56 
727 53 



$990 14 
122 14 



$192,863 83 



35,054 09 



1,112 28 



Total, 



$229,030 20 



Maintenance. 



Appropriation, . 

Expenses (as analyzed below),' 



$161,200 00 
161,200 00 



Analysis of Expenses 

Salaries, wages and labor : — 
General administration, 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female), 
Repairs and improvements, 
Farm, stable and grounds, . 



Food: — 
Butter, 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 
Cereals, rice, meal, etc 
Cheese, 



Flour, 
Fish, 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and syrup, 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, . 



Clothing and materials : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, 
Clothing, ..... 
Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 



$19,293 39 
7,538 37 
15,241 15 
11,440 29 
4,523 01 
10,608 57 



$7,049 82 
271 70 
307 72 
1,866 59 
114 43 
2,876 91 
5,118 37 
1,582 78 
1,730 43 
10,884 38 
2 05 
501 95 
2,734 79 
637 10 
4,175 32 
1,638 73 



$652 43 
1,028 13 
1,108 38 



5,644 78 



41,493 07 



Amounts carried forward, 



$2,788 94 $110,137 85 



1909. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



33 



Amounts brought forward, 

Clothing and materials — Con. 
Hats and caps, . 
Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries, . 

Furnishings: — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms, 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 

Furniture and upholstery, 

Kitchen furnishings, . 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 

Sundries, . 



Heat, light and power: 
Coal, 
Wood, 
Gas, . 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements: — 
Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., 
Electrical work and supplies 
Hardware, . 
Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., . 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., 
Plumbing, steam fitting and suppl 
Roofing and materials, 
Sundries, . 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc 
Hay, grain, etc., 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Horses, 
Cows, 
Rent, 

Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Sundries, . 

Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressage and transportat 
Funeral expenses, 
Gratuities, .... 



ion, 



S2,783 94 S110,137 85 



50 38 
777 51 
237 46 



82,336 10 
352 47 
412 36 
810 06 
488 54 
440 42 
94 14 
136 80 



$8,722 45 
8 25 
64 80 
405 39 
67 55 



S138 00 
675 73 
316 01 
934 93 
624 36 

1,041 73 
187 21 

1,281 99 

3,121 30 
607 58 
329 19 



$583 93 
440 82 
624 73 

6,739 88 
254 77 
650 00 
875 50 
95 00 
781 86 
108 65 



$171 40 
1,446 74 
928 81 
282 25 
52 66 



3,854 29 



5,070 89 



9.268 44 



9,258 03 



11,155 14 



Amounts carried forward, .... $2,881 86 $148,744 64 



34 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... $2,881 86 $148,744 14 



Miscellaneous — Con. 
Hose, etc., 

Ice, ..... 
Medicines and hospital supplies, 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 
Manual training supplies, 
Postage, .... 
Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report, 
% Return of runaways, . 
Soap and laundry supplies, . 
Stationery and office supplies, 
School books and school supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Tobacco, .... 
Water, .... 
Sundries, .... 



382 44 
267 26 
3,396 17 
70 00 
39 25 
360 35 
4 83 
151 46 
27 90 
1,160 59 
699 91 
25 51 
599 61 
158 80 
563 81 
1,240 31 
425 30 



12,455 36 



Total expenses for maintenance, ..... $161,200 00 



Special Appropriations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1908, $10,057 83 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... 123,000 00 

Total, $133,057 83 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), . . . 34,566 56 

Balance Nov. 30, 1909, ....... $98,491 27 

Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, $1,112 28 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 8,887 72 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1909, schedule, .... 1,979 62 



Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, 



$11,979 62 
$11,979 62 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



-No. 62. 



35 



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36 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



VALUATION. 



Land, $31,637 00 

Buildings, 505,416 89 

Water and sewerage systems, 41,843 62 

Personal Property. 

Provisions and groceries, 3,894 17 

Ready-made clothing, 2,955 26 

Dry goods : — 

For clothing, 1,750 22 

For bedding, etc., 154 48 

Furnishings : — 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . . . 20,097 05 
Other furnishings in inmates' department, . . . 30,921 28 
Personal property of state in superintendent's depart- 
ment, . 8,257 16 

All other property, 7,302 97 

Heat, light and power: — 

Fuel, 2,040 16 

All other property, . . 1,123 00 

Repairs and improvements: — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 48,021 34 

All other property, 2,461 25 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Live stock on the farm, 11,896 50 

Produce of the farm on hand, 9,526 28 

Carriages and agricultural implements, .... 7,365 70 

All other property, 2,554 65 

Miscellaneous : — 

Drugs and medicines, 1,930 38 

Tobacco, 38 99 

Library, 1,150 00 

Other supplies undistributed, 4,251 04 



$746,589 39 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 37 

Nurses' Training School Fund. 

Balance on hand Dec. 1, 1908, $385 54 

Twelve months' receipts, v . . 607 03 



S992 57 

Twelve months' payments, 542 27 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1909, S450 30 

Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $23 58 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 363 04 

Cash in office, 63 68 



$450 30 

Patients' Money. 

Balance on hand Dec. 1, 1908, $699 85 

Twelve months' receipts, 2,249 33 



$2,949 18 

Twelve months' pajments, 2,298 20 



Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1909, $650 98 

Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $34 38 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 557 06 

Cash in office, ' . . 59 54 



S650 9S 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



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42 



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1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 43 



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44 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



4- — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





First admitted to 




Other 






Any Hospital. 


Admissions. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 




8 






i 






"i 

js 






8 


■a 


1 


8 






73 


"3 


JO 






Fern 






Fern 


1 


Male 


Fern 


Tota 


A. — Insane: — 




















Bristol County, . 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


_ 


2 


Hampden County, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Suffolk County, . 


10 


6 


16 


- 


3 


3 


10 


9 


19 


Worcester County, 


2 


j 


3 


- 




— 





1 


3 


Middlesex County, 


8 


2 


10 


1 


- 


1 


9 


2 


11 


Totals, .... 


22 


10 


32 


1 


3 


4 


23 


13 


36 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over), 


20 


8 


28 


1 


3 


4 


21 


11 


32 


Country districts (under 10,000), . 


2 


2 


4 








2 


2 


4 


B_ — Sane: — 




















Barnstable County, 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 


Berkshire County, 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


2 




3 


Bristol County, . 


7 


3 


10 








7 


3 


10 


Essex County, 


3 


6 


9 


1 




1 


4 


6 


10 


Franklin County, 


2 




2 








2 




2 


Hampden County, 


3 


4 


7 


2 




2 


5 


4 


9 


Hampshire County, . 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Middlesex County, 


14 


5 


19 


2 




2 


16 


5 


21 


Norfolk County, 


3 


2 


5 


1 




1 


4 


2 


6 


Plymouth County, 


2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


5 


Suffolk County, . 


24 


8 


32 


6 


1 


7 


30 


9 


39 


Worcester County, 


9 


5 


14 


1 


1 


2 


10 


6 


16 


Totals, .... 


69 


37 


106 ' 


16 


3 


19 


84 


40 


124 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over), 


55 


25 


80 


14 


2 


16 


69 


27 


96 


Country districts (under 10,000), . 


15 


12 


27 


2 


1 


3 


17 


13 


30 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 






m 

to 






8 






8 






03 


"08 




03 


"3 




9 


"3 






Male 


Fern 


Tota 


Male 


Fem 


i 


Male 


Fern 


Tota 


Unmarried 


18 


9 


27 


55 


31 


86 


73 


40 


113 


Married, 


4 


1 


5 


14 


4 


18 


18 


5 


23 


Widowed, 








1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


Divorced, 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Totals 


22 


10 


32 


70 


37 


107 


92 


47 


139 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 45 

6. — Occupation of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



Males. 





Insane. 


O! 



c3 
CO 


Totals. 




Insane. 


«; 

c 

CQ 


Totals. 


Attendant, 




1 


1 

1 


Plumber, . 




1 


1 


Butcher, . 




1 


1 






I 


1 


Clerk, 


3 


4 


7 


Shoemaker, 


1 


3 


4 


Errand boy, 




1 


1 


Student, . 




8 


8 


Glass grinder, . 




1 


1 


Tool grinder, . 
Upholsterer, 




1 


1 


Hat maker, 




1 


1 


1 




1 


Laborer, . 


1 


6 


7 


Watchman, 




2 


2 


Laundry employee, 




1 


1 


Weaver, . 




1 


1 


Machinist, 


1 


3 


4 


Woodworker, . 




1 


1 


Mill operative, 


1 


1 


2 


No occupation, 


14 


30 


44 


Morocco dresser, 




1 


1 




















Porter, 




1 


1 


Totals, . 


22 


70 


92 



Females. 



Bookkeeper, . 




1 


1 


Shoe operative, 




2 


2 


Errand girl, 


1 




1 


Skate manufacturer, 




1 


1 


Domestic, 


2 


1 


3 


Student, . 




4 


4 


General Electric Com- 








No occupation, 


7 


20 


27 


pany, . 




1 


1 




















Housewife, 




4 


4 


Totals, . 


10 


37 


47 


Mill operative, 




3 


3 









WIFE OR DAUGHTER OF 



Blacksmith, 




2 


2 


Music teacher, 




1 




Carpenter, 




1 


1 


Painter, . 


1 






Chair maker, . 




2 


2 


Plater, 








Concrete worker, 




1 




Shipbuilder, 








Crockery dealer, 




1 




Teamster, 








Druggist, . 




1 




Telegraph operator, 








Factory hand, 




1 




Tool maker, 








Farmer, . 


1 


2 




Weaver, . 








Furniture dealer, . 


1 






W^ine clerk, 








Gardener, 




1 




Unknown, 


5 


16 


21 


Liquor dealer, 


1 
























Machinist, 


1 


1 


2 


Totals, . 


10 


37 


47 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



Died. 


AT TIME OF 
DEATH. 




1 IflNMlOCI 1 IM -<f (M 1 


S3 1 




•sareraaj 


1 NHNMH | NW-Hrt 1 


s 1 


16 
36.71 




| MrtrtINN | | -HCIrt 1 


2 1 




AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 




1 CM-* — CO 1 — 1 1 




■ a 


•eareuiaj 


I OS — | — — | «>4 | | | | 


coco 


16 
14.61 




CM CO I I — | — CM 1 — H | t 


CO- 




AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF INSANITY. 




1 «e co -< tM eo -«i< cm — i 


8 1 


«s 


•68r6inaj[ 




2 1 


16 
31.71 


•Bd\TB 


1 CO -H | | HNrtH | 


3 1 




First admitted to Any Hospital. 


I 
I 




I r^r^"*-^ — -* — co i — i 


3 1 


■ I 


•sajBuia^ 


1 i <n-h i | i-i | i i 


2 1 


10 

23.75 




1 OIM^CM 1 | -H | 


§3 1 


s 1 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 


•gre^ox 


-2 NNH ^ 1 1 *-" H 1 ' 


8" 


■ I 


•gareuiaj 


rtlfl | | — — 1 | | 1 1 1 


00 CM 


10 

12 18 

* 




I TJJCNKN 1 il 1 1 — — 1 1 


£~ 


22 
17.85 


If 

!i 

< 


•sre^ox 




3 ' 






| — «l« 1 tM-H 1 | «H | | | 


2 1 


10 

23.75 






£ 1 


■ I 


O 
<! 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, 

20 to 25 years, 

25 to 30 years 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years, 

60 to 70 years 

70 to 80 years 

80 to 90 years, 

Totals, 

Total persons 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 62. 



J 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




! »-< c? t- <m tM r- i 


oo i 


28 
39.44 


•S8J13UI8J 




3 1 


13 

32.26 






S 1 




AT FIRST ATTACK OF 
EPILEPSY. 




""S^ IBHMI 


3 1 


28 
18.92 




1 ©- 1 , 1 I III 


2 1 


13 
14.80 




rtlfJWHrtrt | (M | I -h I 


£ 1 


15 

22.50 


First admitted to Any Hospital. 


s 


•srtuoj, 




§' 




•eareuiaj 


1 N^«hh | | 


S3 1 


37 
23.64 






£ 1 


70 
24.17 


AT FIRST ATTACK OF 
EPILEPSY. 


•sitnox 


I g«NN*^ 1 


8" 


§ I 


•earemaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


ss 1 


37 
14.93 




1 -iO^_~M<N-~~ 1 




70 
16.70 


AGES. 




















Congenital, 

15 years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, . 

20 to 25 years, . 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, . 

35 to 40 years, . 

40 to 50 years, . 

50 to 60 years, . 

60 to 70 years, . 

70 to 80 years, , 

80 to 90 years, . 


Totals, 
Unknown, 

Total persons, 

Mean known a<;e, 



48 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 

8. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



Predisposing Causes. 



EXCITING CAUSES. 


Admitted. 


HEREDITARY 
TENDENCY. 


NEUROTIC 
TENDENCY. 


ALCOHOLIC 
TENDENCY. 


i 
*3 


Females. 


03 

"3 

1 


m 
u 

3 


Females. 


"3 


i 

"3 

^! 


Females. 


i 

o 


1 


Females. 


*3 
° 

H ■ 


1 ftOtiflt/ • 

Physical : — 
Blow on head, 
Meningitis, 
Sunstroke, 


i 

_ 

i 


1 


l 
l 
l 




















Totals, 


2 


1 


3 





















Unknown, . 


20 




29 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


8 


1 


9 


Totals, 


22 


10 


32 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


8 


1 


9 


Sane. 


























Physical: — 


























Blow on head, 


4 


2 


6 




















Cerebral hemor- 


























rhage, . 


1 


1 


2 




















Cut on head, . 


1 




1 




















Excessive use of 


























alcohol, 


1 




I 




















Fright^ . 




1 


I 




















Gastritis, 


- 


1 


1 




















Irregular life and 


























habits, . 


1 
























-'-1 '- 1 1 IV- . • • • 


1 
























Overeating, 


z 


















1 


- 


1 


Overstudy, 




1 






















Rachitis, . 




1 






1 


1 


- 




- 








Sunstroke, 




1 






















Traumatism, . 


1 




j 




















Typhoid, . 


1 
1 






i 




i 














Uremia, . 




1 























Totals, 
Unknown, . 

Totals. 

Aggregates, 
Unknown, . 

Aggregates, 


1 Q 

57 


9 
28 


ZZ 
85 


1 

2 


1 


o 
Z 

2 








i 
1 

2 




1 

2 

3 

1 
11 

12 


70 

15 
77 


37 

10 

37 


107 

25 
114 


3 

1 

3 


1 

1 
1 


4 

2 
4 


2 


1 


3 


3 

1 
10 


1 


92 


47 


139 


4 


2 


6 


2 


1 


3 


11 


1 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



CM CO I I OOOOhNM 



CM CM I I M CO M M 1> 



I i—i I I 00 (N O iO O 



00 



I CO I I O N LI t> N 



CM I I CM CO l> © 00 lO 



I i — I I I 00 ^ 00 ^ OS CM 
i-h CM 



CO TjH 
O 



CO 



(Ml I I I H^NOCO 



(Ml I I I I I N ^ M 



I I I I I H ^ LO CO ^ 



O CM 
CO 



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CM 



I CM I I I I I I I 
CO 



I o l I 1 l l l l l 



I CM I I I II I I | 
CM 



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CO 



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CM I 
CM 



d 
„ o 

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d d 
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a s 

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co co 



W [» K 02 
f-( f-t S-l ?H 

c3 c3 c3 c3 
CD CD CD CD 
>» >» ^ ~ 

CM LO O O S 
H CM c3 

CD 

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-+-=> +3 •+-> 

^CM^og 



02 ^ 

13 d 



d 
o 

o9 

d 



o 
d 

CD 

SP 



50 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 





•e^ox 


h CO CM 
CO 


O C5 
CO CO 


CM 


t-H O r— 1 

T-H 


CM t^ 

oo oo 


OS 

CO 


< 
§ 

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CO CM 


O OS 

T-H T-H 


CM 


T-H tO 1 

CO 


CO CO 
CO CO 


t-H 

CO 




co I 


o o 

CM CM 


to 


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CO to 


00 
CO 






CM 


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CO CO 


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CM CM 


CM 


Died. 


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MM h 


so co 


T-H 


CM t-h | 


CO CO 


CM 

t-H 






CM CM 1 


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o 


CO CM 1 


iO 

T-H T-H 


CM 

T-H 


VED. 




1 1 1 


II 1 CM CM t-h 

T-H 


tO >o 

T-H T-H 


CM 

t-H 


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1 1 1 


II 1 T-H T-H | 


CM CM 


CM 


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1 1 1 


II 1 t-H r-i 


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O N H 


OS OS 


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^ tO 1 
CO 


Ci Ci 
CO CO 


CO 
CO 


a 
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T-H 


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T-H 


T-H T— 1 

CM CM 


T-H 


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t-H 




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oo oo 

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1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 51 



11. — Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 


Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


SR 
o 

a 


Females. 


Totals. 


r. 

s 


Females. 


Totals. 


03 
\ 

s 


1 

e 

© 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 




















Cerebral hemorrhage, 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


4 


Cerebral thrombosis, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


Epilepsy, . 


- 


6 


6 


1 


3 


4 


1 


9 


10 


Epileptic convulsion, 


- 


1 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Exhaustion from epilepsy, . . . 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


4 


CI, • 1 Mi 

Status epilepticus, .... 


2 


i 
1 


O 

o 


2 




A 

4 


4 


3 


7 


Softening of the brain, 


- 






1 




1 


1 


- 


1 


Respiratory system: — 




















Hemorrhage from the lungs, . 


1 

X 




1 




— 


_ 


i 

X 




1 


(Edema oi the lungs, ... 




_ 


_ 


- 


1 


1 




1 


1 


(Edema, pulmonary, 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


1 


(Edema, pulmonary, following apo- 




















plexy, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


— 


1 


1 


Pneumonia, broncho, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Pneumonia, lobar, .... 


— 


1 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


1 


2 


T» 11 1 

Pneumonia, lobular, 




i 


1 
1 


I 




1 
1 


1 


I 




luberculosis, pulmonary, 


5 


1 


6 


1 


2 


3 


6 


3 


9 


Circulatory system : — 




















Acute dilatation of heart, 


1 




1 








1 




i 

i. 


l^dTQldL pdidl\ bio, .... 


1 


— 


1 


- 


• — 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Chronic endocarditis, 


1 


— 


1 


- 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Chronic myocarditis, 


1 




1 

X 








1 




1 


Pericarditis, ..... 




- 






1 


1 




1 


1 


Genito-urinary system : — 




















Interstitial nephritis, 








1 


1 


2 


1 




2 


Uremia, ...... 


- 






1 




1 


1 




1 


General : — 




















Diabetes mellitus, .... 








1 




1 


1 




1 


Asphyxia, ...... 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Digestive system : — 




















Acute dilatation of stomach, . 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Totals, . . . 


14 


16 


30 


15 


13 


28 


29 


29 


58 



52 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 





hit 




i i i 


1 1 


1 


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109.33 


00 




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116.40 


DMISSION 


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1 1 


1 




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1 


1 


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100.50 


ERIOD 




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1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



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145.50 


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207.50 


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Congenital, 
Under 1 month, 
From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, 

5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 

Over 20 years, . 

Totals 

Unknown, 

Totals 

Average of known cases (in 
months), 



Public Document No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Monson State Hospital 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) , 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1910. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEE PEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1911. 



Public Document 



No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 

Monson State Hospital 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 

FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1910. 




^flL BOSTON: 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1911. 

X 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



3*3. 3 M 3 

3 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers .......... 5 

Trustees' Report .......... 7 

Superintendent's Report . . . . . . . . .11 

General Information ......... 18 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room . . . .19 

Articles made and repaired on the Wards ..... 21 

Work done in the Industrial Room ....... 22 

Farm Products ........... 23 

List of Persons regularly employed ...... 25 

Treasurer's Report .......... 26 

Statistical Tables . ... . . . . . .33 



OFFICERS 



Monson State Hospital 



TRUSTEES. 

WILLIAM X. BULLARD, M.D., Chairman. 
MABEL W. STEDMAN, 
HENRY P. JAQUES, M.D., 
WALTER W. SCOFIELD, M.D., . 
MARY P. TOWXSLEY, Secretary, 
JOHX BAPST BLAKE, M.D., 
EDWARD P. BAGG, 



Boston*. 

Brookxixe. 

Lexox. 

Daltox. 

Springfield. 

Bostox. 

Holyoke. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., . 
M ORG AX B. HODSKIXS, M.D. 
ALDEX V. COOPER. M.D., 
FREDERICK W. GUILD, M.D. 
EDMUND S. DOUGLASS, M.D. 
AMY C. CLIFTON, 

LELAXD B. ALFORD, 
CHARLES F. SIMONDS, . 
GEORGE E. BATES, . 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Superintendent 

Matron. 
Research Officer. 
Steward and Storekeeper. 
Engineer. 



and 



WALTER E. HATCH, . 
FLORENCE H. DANIELSON, 



Clerk and Treasurer. 
Field Worker. 



NON-RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

Dr. E. G. BRACKETT, .... Consulting Orthopedic Surgeon. 



Stye Commonroeoltl) of Jttassctcljusetts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

In accordance with chapter 211 of the Acts of 1905 the trustees 
of the Monson State Hospital respectfully present their annual 
report. 

Through the reappointment of Dr. W. N. Bullard, in July, 
1910, the Board of Trustees remains unchanged. 

Certain changes, however, occurred among the officers of the 
hospital. Dr. Edward A. Kennedy, second assistant physician, 
resigned in June, 1910, and his place was filled by the promotion 
of Dr. Alden V. Cooper. This left a vacancy on the staff, which 
was filled by the appointment of Dr. Edmund S. Douglass as 
fourth assistant physician. 

Dr. Annie E. Taft, the research officer (and we believe the first 
female research officer in the State), resigned' on Aug. 1, 1910, 
for the purpose of further study in Europe. Her place has been 
filled by the appointment of Mr. Leland B. xAJford. 

Dr. Morgan B. Hodskins, first assistant physician, returned 
from leave of absence for vacation and study in Europe, and filled 
the place of acting superintendent during the summer months. 

In April, 1910, Miss Amy C. Clifton was appointed assistant 
superintendent, to take charge of the children's colony soon to 
be opened. 

The appropriations for the past year, in addition to the appro- 
priation for current expenses, were : — 

For the extension of the sewerage system, $6,000 

For the purchase of a small pasture adjoining land at present 

the property of the hospital, 740 

For the construction of an employees' cottage, .... 2,000' 



s 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



This latter sum was an addition to money in the possession 
of the hospital which could be applied to this purpose. 

During the past year much work has been accomplished. The 
buildings of the children's colony, three in number, an adminis- 
tration building and two dormitories, to provide for 150 patients, 
have been built and furnished - t and patients are now being admitted 
to these buildings. Miss Clifton, the assistant superintendent, 
lives in the central building, and has full charge of the colony,' 
except the medical work, under the direction of the superintendent. 

The foundations of the new employees' cottage have been laid, 
and the building itself is well under way. 

The apparatus for the evaporation of fruit has been installed 
and does excellent work. 

A hot-air furnace was put in at Farm cottage last spring and 
is of much service. 

Arrangements have been made with the town of Monson for 
the continuation of the macadamizing of the road to Palmer. 

In recompense for damage done to the hospital land through 
fire caused by a locomotive, the sum of $750 has been received. 

The trustees have voted to ask for the following appropria- 
tions this year: — 

For an extension of the laundry and suitable machinery therefor, $1 5,000 
For an extension of our present dining hall building in such 
manner as to provide suitable dining rooms for the nurses, 
attendants and other employees separate from the patients, 
and to accommodate a larger number of patients, . . 25,000 
To enlarge the refrigerating facilities and to fireproof certain 
floors, 3,000 



The trustees feel that the time has now arrived when a definite 
future policy for the hospital must be carefully considered. One 
of the first questions to be discussed and to be provisionally set- 
tled is that of the proper number of patients who should be 
eventually cared for in this institution. The limit of patients in 
any such hospital as this must be determined provisionally from 
two standpoints: first, that of the general advisability of size, 
care of patients, etc., for institutions of this special class; secondly, 
from the point of view of the special circumstances and condi- 
tions of the particular institution under consideration. The 



Total, 



$43,000 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



determination of questions of this character lies at the root of 
our present action. It would be manifestly unwise to ask for 
provision for power or for heat or light for 2,000 patients if it 
were considered advisable that the hospital should never contain 
more than 1,500. While the converse is also true, that is, if 
2,000 is the proper number of patients for the institution eventu- 
ally to care for, it may be a distinct saving to prepare early for 
the power, heat and light sufficient for this number, rather than 
to make numerous additions and extensions to plants already in 
existence, or to be obliged to build new ones, thus increasing the 
ultimate cost. 

In close connection with this question is that of the kind of 
patients to be received, and the trustees feel that the time has 
now arrived when the limitations in age now existing by law 
should be removed. The establishment of the children's colony 
enables the trustees to make suitable provision for children of 
any age, and it seems only appropriate that the hospital should 
take the class most amenable to treatment and offering the strong- 
est prospect of recovery. It will be of great advantage to the 
community that those afflicted with epilepsy should be adequately 
cared for from the earliest possible age by experts, so that if a 
cure is possible all available means may be taken to secure it, 
and if a cure is not possible, the child should be placed in the best 
condition mentally and physically to bear its burden. The hos- 
pital, moreover, should in justice have the opportunity of exam- 
ining and treating its patients as early as is practicable after the 
onset of the disease. While ready to take patients at any stage 
of illness, it is much less beneficial to the patient and less satis- 
factory to the trustees to have patients admitted at a time in 
their illness when treatment can be of little or no avail. 

For these reasons the trustees recommend that so much of 
the Acts of 1909, sections 57 and 58, chapter 504, as refers to 
a limit from age be stricken out and removed, and that no age 
limit be placed on patients admitted to this hospital. 

The hospital has, during the past year, been striving to do its 
duty to the public in the matter of study and research in epi- 
lepsy. For this purpose it has engaged actively in the work of 
increasing its specialist library, both by buying, and, where pos- 
sible, by encouraging gifts of books of this character. 

The research officer, Dr. Taft, has performed some valuable 



10 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



and important investigations in our laboratory in regard to the 
nature of epilepsy. Some of these have been and some are to 
be published. They are as follows: — 

Lesions of the Major Trunk Viscera in Epileptics. 
Brief Outlines of Observations made with Guinea Pigs. 
Outline of Report of Study of Brown-Sequard Epilepsy in the Guinea 
Pig. 

Brown-Sequard Study in Inheritance. 

Through the kindness of the American Breeders' Association, 
the hospital has been enabled to employ a field worker on the 
heredity of epilepsy. Since October 1 Miss Florence Danielson, 
who has received special training for this work, has been at the 
service of the hospital. Her salary is paid by the association, 
while the hospital provides traveling expenses and board and 
lodging while she is with us. 

It need scarcely be said that this is a very advantageous arrange- 
ment for us, and that the public is receiving a valuable gift from 
this association, to whom the trustees herewith transmit their 
thanks. 

The great importance of the determination of heredity in epi- 
lepsy is well known to experts, but its bearing is not always fully 
comprehended by those who have no special acquaintance with 
these subjects. On the settlement of the laws of heredity in 
this disease depends primarily, in large part, the success of our 
efforts in prevention. Until we know when and where to expect 
its occurrence, under what circumstances and conditions it is 
liable to "spontaneously" appear, our best efforts to curb and 
prevent it must necessarily fall far short of those theoretically 
possible. 

In concluding this report the trustees desire to give their thanks 
to Dr. E. G. Brackett of Boston for his very valuable services 
in orthopedic surgery, and to Dr. Walter R. Weiser of Spring- 
field for services in surgery. 

WILLIAM N. BULLARD, Chairman. 

For the Trustees. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



11 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year ending Nov. 
30, 1910. 

The routine of our daily work has fortunately not been inter- 
rupted during the year by unusual occurrences. Our effort has 
been to keep each detail up to its standard. This is no small 
undertaking. Many lines of work and treatment are started, 
but to keep the thread of each and to be sure that none is neglected 
require constant vigilance on the part of the head of each depart- 
ment. Our first work is for the patient. To treat each case as 
individually as the time will allow, to attend to all the items of 
care and treatment, suitable clothing and work adapted from 
day to day to the condition of each case (a very varying respon- 
sibility), require much attention, constantly applied. The 
instructions due to the persons employed to carry out the detail 
work form a very decided responsibility. To do justice to the 
sometimes mistaken patient and equally to look after the side 
of the faithful though mistaken attendant give ample bodily 
and mental exercise to your officers. The feature of meeting and 
pleasing the visiting relation is also to be considered as a press- 
ing and ever present duty, — one that helps more than anything 
else to keep our work right in the eye of the public. With all 
these and other varied duties, many of which cannot be antic- 
ipated or described, we have still to make room for such work 
as comes in connection with enlargement of buildings, increase 
of numbers, medically keeping up with the times and a score of 
duties not easy to enumerate. I think that I may report that 
in the main these points have been observed and each given its 
due weight so far as the ability of your medical staff and other 
employees has been competent. We may at least report that we 
are alive to the responsibility imposed upon us, and that defects 
are due to our limitations rather than to our inactivity. 



12 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Our whole number of patients has so increased that much 
work has been done in connection with the quarters for these 
new cases. There have also been the usual improvements where 
these were most necessary on the grounds and in the buildings. 
We have been able to assist the town officers in adding to the 
macadam road toward Palmer. Another year of this work will 
probably see the road extended to the bridge. Work of this sort is 
an actual economy, as our teaming is so much less expensive over 
a good road. 

We have added six lights to our street equipment. They are 
necessary additions to our illumination of the grounds adjacent 
to our buildings, but serve a very useful purpose for the towns- 
people who pass this way. It appears that our efforts in this 
direction are appreciated by our neighbors. 

Three dormer windows have been added to the farm group 
buildings, making the chambers better lighted and aired and 
adding to the comfort of the employees who are housed there. 

The use of the fruit evaporator has been a feature of much 
interest and profit. We are able to quickly dry any fruit or 
vegetable when it shows softening. The windfall apples and 
other early fruit are thus saved, and none need be lost by decay. 

The advantage derived from the pump which was installed 
at the ice pond has been marked. It has supplied the laundry 
with water during the dry season. The regular water supply 
has been ample for all other purposes. 

We have built in recent years almost wholly for the accommo- 
dation of patients, and now need to add to our service facilities. 
I therefore recommend that you make provision for the follow- 
ing:— 

1. An appropriation of $3,000 for enlarging the store refriger- 
ator and for fireproofing the floor of the machine shop. 

2. An appropriation of $15,000 for an extension of the laundry 
and additional machinery. 

3,. An appropriation of $25,000 for an extension of our dining- 
room facilities. 

There are several other rather pressing needs apparent, but 
they must of necessity wait for action at some later date. 

Mr. Leland B. Alford was appointed pathologist Aug. 7, 1910. 
A report of his plan of work is briefly outlined. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



He has continued the study of Brown-Sequard epilepsy in 
guinea pigs, begun by Dr. Taft in the endeavor to demonstrate 
its relation to human epilepsy, and possibly, by comparing the 
condition in man with that in the animal, to gain some light on 
the disease in the human being. But whereas Dr. Taft did her 
work along the line of transmission of the condition from parent 
to offspring, and the effect on the nutrition and reproductive 
functions, Mr. Alford is making a study of the nature of the con- 
dition itself; the ways in which it may be produced; the means 
by which it may be prevented; its relation to the nervous sys- 
tem anatomically and physiologically, and the correspondence 
with certain other reflex conditions also seen in the guinea pig, 
as, for instance, the normal scratch reflex, the anaesthetic scratch 
reflex and the scratching reflex that sometimes follows injury to 
the head. 

Aside from this, certain pathological work on the cases that 
come to autopsy is being done. This consists of an intense study 
of some unusual cases and the routine histological examination 
of all cases. 

The introduction of accounts which will indicate clearly the 
expense of maintaining each separate ward and department is 
now completed and will be of much service. 

The continuation of the work of collecting a library on epilepsy 
has been a special care. The library now consists of 91 books 
and 260 subjects. Number of subjects on the list to be searched 
out and placed on shelves, 73. 

An account of the medical conference held here February 11 
has been printed, and the plans for a similar conference this 
winter, with the probability of making the subject of inheritance 
the main feature, are under way. This will be announced in 
due time. 

The appointment of Miss Danielson as a field worker under the 
patronage of the American Breeders' Association we have ar- 
ranged with Dr. Charles B. Davenport of Cold Spring Harbor, 
N. Y., secretary of the committee on eugenics. The work briefly 
outlined is as follows : — 

Miss Danielson visits the families of our patients in selected 
cases and follows from one to another until she has obtained a 
very complete pedigree of a given family. A sufficient period 



14 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



has not yet elapsed to obtain a large number, but the effort has 
been to make a thorough work of a few families. Results can 
only be looked for in the future, but certainly the indications are 
that much good can be done. The families themselves will be 
benefited; the institution will have more complete records of 
the cases, and that at a very moderate cost to the institution. 
We shall be able to furnish facts to the proper authorities as to 
where degenerates are more likely to breed within the State bor- 
ders. A further result of the work will very likely be an exten- 
sion of this same line of inquiry under a more central authority, 
and the co-operation of certain other institutions in accord- 
ance with a mature and broadened plan. 

The practical issue of this kind of work, systematized and 
extended, seems likely to tend to the illumination of the seques- 
tered foci of degeneration, crime and peculiarities, publicity and 
consequent outflow of some individuals, and an attenuation of 
the taint. Much practical good and even a diminished ratio 
of degenerates seem within the range of possibility. 

A sample of carving done by patient and photographs of the 
buildings, etc., have been sent to an educational exhibit of the 
work done in colonies for epileptics by the Teachers' College of 
Columbia University. 

Changes have been made in faucets so that persons can drink 
without using a common drinking cup. Extra precautions have 
also been taken with the hot- water faucets, to avoid accidents. 

Post-mortem examinations have been made on 20 cases dur- 
ing the current year. 



Dances, 54; masquerade, 1; moving pictures, 7; excursions 
to lake, 28; excursions to fair, 2; dancing school, 21; physical 
culture class, 13; entertainments, 3; baseball games, 32; rides, 2. 



Clergymen who have held Service. 



Rev. George A. Andrews, 
Rev. Francis S. Brewer. 
Rev. Abram Conklin. 



Rev. William Hart. 
Dr. J. S. Lemon. 
Rev. H. W. Smith. 
Rev. Charles W. Williams. 



Rev. Francis W. Gibbs. 
Rev. Charles Hill. 



Amusements. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 15 



Gifts. 



Name. 


Place. 


Article. 


Mrs. Brainerd, .... 


Palmer 


Toys, books, etc. 


Mr. Robert Power, 


Fall River 


Clothing. 


T. W. Main, .... 


Springfield, .... 


Colliers' Weekly for 1909. 


Dr. W. N. Bullard, . 


Boston, .... 


Boston Medical and Surgical 






Journal for 1909. 


Mrs. Pease, .... 


Monson 


Magazines. 


Edwin Wilcock, .... 


Brookline, .... 


One driving horse. 


Rev. Abram Conklin, 


Monson, .... 


Magazines, books for children. 


Mr. Ezekiel, .... 


Palmer 


Magazines. 


Mrs. Iff. Kenney, 


Dorchester, .... 


Clothing, 


\f T*Q TT RnWTllQTI 

11X13. XX. X_>VJ>> XllcXXl, . . , 


O \Jl iLli^LlKZLKJ. , .... 


A fa Dm 7inp^ 


D. E. Marcy 


Palmer, .... 


Magazines. 


Rev. Fr. Hart, . 


Palmer, .... 


Magazines. 


Mr. John Ryan, 


Springfield, .... 


"Eccheverria on Epilepsy." 


Mrs. E. N. Timmins, 


Roxbury, .... 


Two bureau scarfs, doilies, etc. 


Mr. Edward E. Morgan, 


Auburndale, 


Chair, chiffonier, table. 



Table showing Patients employed and in what Way. 





Men. 


Women. 


Administration building, 




5 


Bakery, 


6 




Barn, 


13 




Carpenter, 


1 




Dining room, 


29. 


25 


Employees' cottage, 

Engineer's department, 


1 


3 


2 




Farm, 


16 




Garden, 


4 




Greenhouse, 


5 




Industrial building, 


18 




Kitchen, 


IS 


29 


Laundry, . . . 


13 


72 


Mason, 


2 




Nurses' home, 




4 


On roads, 


38 




Painter, 


6 




School, 


15 


30 


Sewing room, 




39 


Store, 


3 




Ward work, 


153 


104 


With yard man, 


14 





16 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



Operations. 



Appendicectomy, 


5 


Hemorrhoids, 


1 


Castration, 


1 


Ovariotomy, 


. . 8 


Circumcision, 


. 12 


Salpingotomy, . 


41 


Curettage, .... 


16 


Tonsillotomy, . 


. 13 


Tenotomy of eye muscle. 


5 


Vasectomy, 


. . 15 



List of Graduates. 



Names. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Fannie C. Cronin, 


1901 


Monson State Hospital, supervisor, 


Palmer. 


Mary E. Kilduff, 


1901 


Private nursing 


Springfield. 


Emma S. McKeever, . 


1901 


Matron at State Farm , . 


State Farm. 


Julia O'Brien, 

Edith E. Townsend, . 


1901 
1901 


Private nursing, .... 
Married, 


22 Kenil worth Street, 

Roxbury. 
Bragville, Me. 


Carroll W. Briggs, 


1902 


Boston City Hospital, . 


Boston. 


A. M. D. Manwarring, 


1902 




Averill Park, N. Y. 


Edwin S. Manwarring, 


1902 




Averill Park, N. Y. 


James L. McKeever, . 


1902 




State Farm. 


Walter L. McKeever, . 


1902 


_ 


Middletown, Conn. 


Hattie Edith Rowe, . 


1902 




Georgetown, Me. 


Alice B. Smith, . 


1902 


Bookkeeping, .... 


Med ford. 


Marguerite Casey, 


1903 


Private nursing, .... 


Burlington, Vt. 


Catherine Daley, 


1903 


Connecticut Hospital for Insane, . 


Middletown, Conn. 


Georgia A. Nute, 


1903 


Stamford Hall 


Stamford, Conn. 


George J. Flint, . 


1903 


Motorman 


Palmer, Mass. 


Mae D. Brown, . 


1905 


Private nursing, .... 


Portland, Me. 


Annie A. Caldwell, 


1905 


Private nursing, .... 


Springfield. 


Louis A. Fontaine, 


1905 




Palmer. 


Frank L. Morway, 
Christine McClellan, . 


1905 
1906 


Apothecary at Monson State Hos- 
pital. 

Married, 


Palmer. 

Prince Edward Island. 


Lutie F. Campbell, 
Theresa A. Brown, 


1907 
1907 


Assistant supervisor, Monson State 

Hospital. 
Private nursing 


Palmer. 
Portland, Me. 


Mary G. Hancock, 


1907 


Private nursing 


Hoi yoke. 


Mrs. Anna Woodward, 


1907 


Private nursing, .... 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Elizabeth McCarthy, . 
Samuel E. Chase, 


1907 
1907 


Assistant supervisor, Monson State 

Hospital. 
Brattle boro Retreat, nurse, . 


Palmer. 

Brattleboro, Vt. 


William L. Paine, 


1907 


Monson State Hospital, nurse, 


Palmer. 


EdithlM. Brooks, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Eva G. Caldwell, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Woodstock, N. B. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 17 

List of Graduates — Concluded. 



Names. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Mary J. Caldwell, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Springfield. 


Susan E. Crumb, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Daisy I. Dowling, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Brockton. 


Olla G. Dowling, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Brockton. 


Dora L. Jaques, . 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Presque Isle, Me. 


Agnes M. Millen, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Anna L. Millen, . 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Salem, Mass. 


Katherine C. Murray, 


1908 


Married 


Dorchester. 


Mae I. Perkins, . 


1908 


Married 


Palmer. 


Nellie F. Brown, 


1909 


Married 


Moosup, Conn. 


Mary S. Campbell, 


1909 


Private nursing, .... 


Palmer. 


Katherine Donovan, . 


1909 


Private nursing 


New York City. 


Ermina E. Drennan, . 


1909 • 


Private nursing, .... 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Ruth C. Clark, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


Worcester. 


S. Helen Dickinson, . 


1910 


Private nursing 


Boston. 


Alma T. Gray, . 


1910 


Soldiers' Home, nurse, . 


Togus, Me. 


Cora M. Graham, 


1910 


Long Island Hospital, nurse, 


New York. 


Ida H. Graham, 


1910 


Monson State Hospital, nurse, 


Palmer. 


Bertha S. Hall (Mrs.), 


1910 


Pierce Farm, 


Mattapan. 


Mary L. Hains, 


1910 


Married, ...... 


Great Barrington. 


Maybel M. Jamieson, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


New York City. 


Katherine F. Knight, 


1910 


St. Mary's Hospital, nurse, . 


Dorchester. 


Annie L. Mackay, 


1910 


Soldiers' Home, nurse, . 


Togus, Me. 


Margarette S. Macrae, 


1910 


Married, 


HopewellJunction, N.Y. 





The nurses have worked away from the hospital 99% days. 
Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



18 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the insane 
hospital. 

2. Two forms of commitment: (a) voluntary admission for 
persons over ten years of age, requiring the certificate of one 
doctor, and the doctor's certificate must be certified by a justice; 
(6) commitment for those who are considered dangerous epi- 
leptics, but not otherwise insane. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. Pa- 
tients are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out alone. 
They are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to bed early. 
These restrictions are not irksome when they are fully understood. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much the 
same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 1 
mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the address 
for all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany railroad, 
between Worcester and Springfield, and is at the junction of the 
Boston & Albany and the Xew London Xorthern division of 
the Central Vermont. The Ware River branch of the Boston & 
Albany railroad has one terminus in Palmer, the other in Win- 
chendon. Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, and the railroad fare 
is $1.90. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



19 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 
SEWING ROOMS. 



Made. 



Aprons, .... 


. 326 


Bibs, 


. 180 


Bureau scarfs, . 


55 


Bean bags, 


10 


Bathing aprons, 


4 


Bread covers, . 


2 


Corset covers, . 


19 


Chemises, 


100 


Coats, .... 


40 


Covering for steam pipe, 


1 


Caps for bathing, . 


25 


Curtains: — 




Long muslin (pairs) , . 


9 


Sash (pairs), 


25 


For bookcase, 


3 


For bakery, . . . . 


1 


Clothes-pin bag. 


1 


Dresses, .... 


538 


Drawers (pairs), 


17 


Dressing sacks, 


2 


Dispensary aprons, 


24 


Garters, .... 


297 


Holders, .... 


24 


Ironing-board covers, 


12 


Jumpers, .... 


9 


Kimono, .... 


1 


Laundry bags, 


38 


Mittens (pairs) , 


223 


Mattress covers, 


29 


Muslin straps, . 


6 


Night dresses, . 


259 


Night shirts, . 


139 


Napkins, .... 


12 


Overalls (pairs), 


139 


Overalls for bakers (pairs), 


4 



Petticoats, 


. 34 


Piano cover, 


1 


Pillow slips, 


. 78 


Operating gowns, . 


'* J; ? S ' j| 


Rubber pants (pairs), 


8 


Rugs, 


. 24 


Rubber pillows, 




Rubber pillow covers, . 




Rompers (pairs), 


. 36 


Shirts, .... 


12 


Skirts, .... 


8 


Shirt waists, 


. 23 


Stockings (pairs), . 


2 


Shirt-waist suits, 


7 


Suits, .... 


6 


Sheets, .... 


. 24 


Sofa pillows, 


3 


Stand covers, . 


82 


Suspenders (pairs), . 


. 99 


Sawdust bags, . 


14 


Trousers (pairs), 


37 


Towels, .... 


. 1,440 


Table cloths, . 


. 150 


Ticks, . 


5 


Table cushion cover, 


1 


Tea bags, .... 


/. 4 


Vests, .... 


. 43 


Repaired. 




Aprons, .... 


. 188 


Bibs, 


. 36 


Blankets, .... 


. 64 


Blouses, .... 


. 38 


Barber sheets, . 


2 


Bedspreads, 


. 44 


Bath robes, 


5 



20 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



Corset covers, . 


. . 92 


Pajamas (suits), 


. . 10 


Corsets, . 


. . 8 


Portiere, . 


1 


Chemises, 


74 


Rompers (suits), 


. . 77 


Coats, 


. 717 


Rugs, 


7 


Clothes bags, . 


. . 20 


Shirts, 


. 1,122 


Curtains (pairs) , 


. . 16 


Stockings (pairs), . 


. . 4,300 


Curtains, roller, 


2 


Shirt waists, 


. . 19 


Dresses, . 


. 643 


Skirts, 


. 14 


Drawers, . 


. . 889 


Sweaters, . 


. . 7 


Flag, .... 


1 


Shawl, 


1 


Jumpers, . 


. . 49 


Sheets, 


. . 4 


Laundry bags, 


. 171 


Suspenders (pair), . 


1 


Mittens (pairs), 


. . 6 


Trousers (pairs), 


. 804 


Mattress covers, 


. . 16 


Table cloths, . 


7 


Man's suit, 


1 


Table cover, 


1 


Night dresses, .. 


. 748 


Ticks, 


. . 6 


Overalls (pairs), 


. . 347 


Towels, 


4 


Petticoats, 


. . 311 


Union suits, 


2 


Pillow slips, 


. 42 


Vests, 


. . 94 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 21 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED ON 
THE WARDS. 



Aprons, 


26 


Laundry bags, . 


3 


Bibs, . 


. 123 


Mattress covers, 


. . 55 


Blanket, 


1 


Night slips, 


. . 6 


Bedspread, 


1 


Pillow slips, 


. . 10 


Coats, 


.239 


Shirts, . ... 


. . 863 


Drawers, . 


. . 218 


Suspenders, 


. . 81 


Garters (pairs), 


. . 11 


Trousers, . 


. . 560 


Hose, 


. . 5 


Union suits, 


. . 6 


Hay ticks, 


. . 12 


Vests, 


. . 16 



22 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



WORK DONE IX THE INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Articles Carved. 




Repaired. 




Door signs, . 


14 


Ankle braces, 


2 


Numbers, . 


96 


Base balls, 


3 






Base-ball gloves, . 


4 


Cut. 




Base-ball bases, 


3 


Coats, 


55 


Belts, .... 


6 


Mittens (pairs), 


372 


Camp stools, . 


10 


Overalls, men's (pairs), 


129 


Chairs, .... 


t> 


Trousers (pairs), . 


66 


Curry combs, 


2 


Vests, ...... 


49 


Laundry baskets, . 


12 






Leather cases for clocks. 


2 


Made. 




Piano stool, . 


f n 1 


Cemetery head marks, 


4 


Rugs, .... 


22 


Coat hangers, 


155 


Screens 


3 


Envelopes, large : — 




Shoes, .... 


1,532 


For office, . . . . 


1,480 


Stretcher, 


1 


For pills, . 


4,800 


Suspenders (pairs) , 


9 


Mattresses, made over, 


323 


Trunk strap, . 


1 


Moccasins, men's (pairs), 


10 


Umbrellas, 


82 


Pillows made over, 


510 






Rugs: — 




Reseated. 




Fancy, .... 


1 


Chairs, .... 


71 


Rope, 


45 






Shoes: — 




Sewed. 




Men's (pairs), . 


220 


Mangle aprons, 


5 


Women's (pairs), 


18 






Slippers, men's (pairs), 


298 


Upholstered. 








Barber chairs, 


4 


Marked. 




Couch, .... 


1 


Shoes (pairs), 


143 


Rocker, .... 


1 


Printed. 








Blanks, 


66,100 






Copies of essays and lectures, 


1,650 






Envelopes, .... 


4,225 






Names, 


136 






Programs, .... 


3,700 







1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 23 



FARM PRODUCTS. 



Apples, eating, 447| barrels, at $3, $1,341 60 

Apples, cider, 823 bushels, at $0.10, 82 29 

Apples, crab, 15f bushels, at $0.75, 11 81 

Beans, shell, 165£ bushels, at $1.25, 206 56 

Beans, string, 126f bushels, at $0.75, 95 06 

Beets, 150 bushels, at $0.60, 90 00 

Beet greens, 36^ bushels, at $0.35, 12 78 

Cabbage, mU tons, at $10, 45 85 

Calves sold, 52, 135 50 

Carrots, 636 bushels, at $0.60, 381 60 

Cider, 1,151 gaUons, at $0.10, 115 10 

Corn, sweet, 535 bushels, at $0.75, 401 25 

Corn, field, 675 bushels, at $0.75, 506 25 

Cows, 4, 110 00 

Currants, 387 quarts, at $0.11, 42 57 

Cucumbers, 33 boxes, at $1.50, 49 50 

Cucumbers, pickle, 40 pecks, at $0.75, 30 00 

Ensilage, 300 tons, at $5, 1,500 00 

Fodder, dry, 25 tons, at $5, 125 00 

Fodder, oat, 20 tons, at $5, . . 100 00 

Fodder, millet, 30 tons, at $5, 150 00 

Grapes, 93 pounds, at $0.03, ....... 2 79 

Hay, 300 tons, at $21, 6,300 00 

Hay, meadow, 8 tons, at $10, 80 00 

Heifers, 2, 55 00 

Lettuce, 316£ boxes, at $0.75, 237 19 

Milk, 271,541 quarts, at $0.06, 16,292 46 

Onions, 404f bushels, at $0.85, 344 04 

Parsnips, 502 bushels, at $1, 502 00 

Pears, 13§ bushels, at $1.75, 23 63 

Peas, 78 bushels, at $1, 78 00 

Peppers, 1J bushels, at $0.75, 1 13 

Pigs, 631 25 

Potatoes, 986 bushels, at $0.70, 690 20 



Amount carried forward, $30,770 41 



24 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, $30,770 41 

Pumpkins, 6,130 pounds, at $0.03, 183 90 

Pork, 8,972 pounds, at $0.10, ' . 897 20 

Radishes, 112 bunches, at $0.25, 28 00 

Radish, horse, 2 bushels, at $1, 2 00 

Rhubarb, 2,359 pounds, at $0.02, 47 18 

Rowen, 40 tons, at $12, 480 00 

Squash, summer, 3£ tons, at $20, 70 00 

Squash, winter, 7- 2 2 oVo tons, at $30, 213 47 

Tomatoes, green, 121 bushels, at $0.50, . . . . . 60 50 

Tomatoes, ripe, 250 bushels, at $0.75, . . . * . . . 187 50 

Turnips, 394§ barrels, at $1.25, 493 13 

Use of teams, 10 00 

Veal, 103 pounds, at $0.11, 11 33 

Wood, 155 cords, at $4.50, 697 50 



$34,152 12 

Greenhouse Products. 

Asparagus, 6 boxes, at $4.50, $27 00 

Cabbage, 2 3 oVo tons, at $10, 1 65 

Celery, 83^ boxes, at $1, 83 33 

Chicken, 219 pounds, at $0.24, . 52 56 

Cucumbers, 1,780, at $0.10, 178 00 

Dandelions, 36 bushels, at $0.75, 27 00 

Eggs, 250 dozen, at $0.30, 75 00 

Fowl, 144 pounds, at $0.18, 25 92 

Lettuce, indoor grown, 13 boxes, at $2.25, .... 29 25 

Lettuce, outdoor grown, 28 boxes, at $0.75, . . . . 21 00 

Parsley, 29 bunches, at $0.05, 1 45 

Pears, 7 bushels, at $1.75, 12 25 

Rhubarb, 25 pounds, at $0.02, 50 

Spinach, 30 bushels, at $0.40, 12 00 

Strawberries, 161 quarts, at $0.10, 16 10 

Tomatoes, green, 6| bushels, at $0.50, 3 40 

Tomatoes, ripe, 26 bushels, at $0.75, 19 50 

Bulbs, plants, flowers, etc., 4,367 94 



$4,953 85 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 25 



LIST OF PERSONS 

Regularly employed at Monson State Hospital. 



Superintendent, per year, $3,000 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 1,500 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 1,200 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 800 00 

Assistant physician, per year, 600 00 

Pathologist, per year, 600 00 

Steward, per year, 1,200 00 

Engineer, per year, 1,200 00 

Matron and assistant superintendent, per year, .... 1,000 00 

Clerk and treasurer, per year, 1,100 00 



26 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1910 : — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1909, 



Cash Account. 



$1,112 28 



Receipts. 



Institution Receipts 
Board of inmates: — 
Private, 

Reimbursements, 
Cities and towns, 

Salaries, wages and labor: 
Labor of employees, 
Wages not called for, 



Food, 

Clothing and materials, 
Furnishings, 

Repairs and improvements, 
Miscellaneous, 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Cows and calves, 
Pigs and hogs, 
Ice, . 
Vegetables, 
Use of teams, 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances, 
Sundries, 



$7,717 11 
3,418 98 
364 78 



$8 00 
35 42 



$684 06 
280 45 
2 82 
150 01 
58 58 



$300 50 
631 25 
57 93 
20 
10 00 
854 91 



$134 24 
11 96 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance of 1909 '. 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30), 

Approved schedules of 1910, 

Special appropriations, ..... 



$11,500 87 



43 42 



1,175 92 



1,854 79 



146 20 



$1,979 62 

9,000 00 
156,860 86 



14,721 20 



167,840 48 
93,158 44 



Total $276,832 40 



1910. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, S14.721 20 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1909, . . 3,819 43 

Eleven months' schedules, 1910, . . 156,860 86 

November advances, ..... 8,541 79 



Special appropriations: — 

Approved schedule (893,158.44, 
1909, S727.53), 
Balance Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank, .... 

In office, .... 



less advances of November, 



$268 91 
189 30 



§183,943 28 



92,430 91 



458 21 



Total, 



8276,832 40 



Maintenance. 



Appropriation, 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 



8167,500 00 
167,500 00 



Analysis of Expenses 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), 
Ward service (female), 
Repairs and improvements 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



Food: — 
Butter, 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and syrup, 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



Clothing and materials: — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 
Furnishing goods, 



$21,126 09 
7,305 59 
16,843 59 
12,453 63 
4,422 14 
9,787 05 



87,987 40 
146 49 
386 18 
1,829 28 
153 01 
2,784 14 
4,390 50 
1,615 75 
1,594 52 
12,161 85 
2 88 
514 21 
2,599 00 
622 98 
2,145 68 
1,105 97 



8582 49 
794 32 
1,257 22 
5 88 



$71,938 09 



40,039 84 



Amounts carried forward, .... $2,639 91 $111,977 93 



28 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, 



$2,639 91 $111,977 



Clothing and materials — Con. 
Hats and caps, 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, 



Furnishings: — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms, 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc. 

Furniture and upholstery, 

Kitchen furnishings, 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc. 

Sundries, .... 



Heat, light and power: 
Coal, 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements: — 
Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., 
Electrical work and supplies, 
Hardware, . 
Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., . 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 
Roofing and materials, 
Sundries, 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Cows, 
Rent, 

Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Sundries, 



Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressage and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, 
Gratuities, .... 
Hose, etc., .... 
Ice, . ! 

Medicines and hospital supplies, 



30 38 
610 88 

31 20 



$1,464 77 
370 01 
270 35 
920 48 
216 63 
933 78 
78 15 
236 82 



$15,439 66 
327 08 
181 67 



$91 00 
351 24 
42 21 
1,204 58 
674 60 
1,024 71 
354 03 
1,542 10 
2,340 23 
35 81 
52 11 



$372 35 
621 89 
872 97 

7,092 63 
176 01 
497 00 
76 00 
924 09 
311 89 



$401 12 
1,292 03 
1,439 39 
123 75 
11 90 
69 64 
897 48 
2,086 98 



3,312 37 



4,490 99 



15,948 41 



7,712 62 



10,944 83 



Amounts carried forward, 



$6,322 29 $154,387 15 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



29 



Amounts brought forward, 



$6,322 29 $154,387 15 



Miscellaneous — Con. 

Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), 
Postage, .... 
Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report, 
Return of runaways, 
Soap and laundry supplies, . 
Stationery and office supplies, 
School books and school supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Tobacco, .... 
Water, .... 
.Sundries, .... 



77 30 
426 27 
18 07 

156 32 
46 95 

2,053 84 
937 13 
1 37 
621 02 

157 97 
605 88 

1,435 34 
253 10 



13,112 85 



Total expenses for maintenance, ..... $167,500 00 



Special Appropkiations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1909, $98,491 27 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... 8,740 00 

Total, $107,231 27 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), $93,158 44 

Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 71 08 

93,229 52 



Balance Nov. 30, 1910, $14,001 75 



Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, \ $458 21 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 8,541 79 
Due from treasury of Commonwealth, account 

November, 1910, schedule, .... 1,639 14 

$10,639 14 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, . . . . . . $10,639 14 



30 



MOXSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



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1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 31 



VALUATION. 



Land, S32,377 00 

Buildings, 569,788 69 

Water and sewerage systems,. 46,458 23 

Persona] property: — 

Provisions and groceries, 2,522 05 

Clothing and clothing material, . . . . . . 4,441 43 

Furnishings, 77 ; 855 50 

Heat, light and power: — 

Fuel, ^ 145 30 

All other property, 1,278 41 

Repairs and improvements: — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, .... 50,122 79 

All other property, 3,476 21 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Live stock on the farm, 15,230 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, 1.277 50 

Carriages and agricultural implements, .... 8,366 73 

All other property, . . . . . . . . 1,959 32 

Miscellaneous, 10,094 80 



$825,393 96 

Nurses' Training School Fund. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1909, §450 30 

Twelve months' receipts, 331 89 



$782 19 

Twelve months' payments, 373 22 



Balance Nov. 30, 1910. 



$408 97 



32 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 1910. 

Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $55 89 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 337 70 

Cash in office, 15 38 

$408 97 

Patients' Money. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1909, $650 98 

Twelve months' receipts, 1,995 68 

$2,646 66 

Twelve months' payments, 1,969 86 

$676 80 

Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, . . . . . $57 26 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 569 96 

Cash in office, 49 58 



$676 80 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



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38 MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





First admitted 
to Any Hospital. 


Other 
Admissions. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 


















00 
O 






Males 


Fema! 


Totals 


Males 


Fema] 


Totals 


Males 


Fema] 


Totals 


A. — Insane: — 

Bristol County, . 
Hampden County, 
Middlesex County, 
Suffolk County, 
Worcester County, 


1 

9 
3 
14 


10 

g 

7 


1 

19 
11 

21 


1 

2 


1 


1 

1 

2 


2 

9 
5 

14 


11 

g 

7 


2 

20 
13 
21 


Totals 


27 


25 


52 


3 


1 


4 


30 


26 


56 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over) , 
Country districts (under 10,000), . 


14 
13 


18 

7 


32 
20 


2 
1 




3 
1 


16 
14 


19 
7 


35 
21 


B. — Sane: — 

Berkshire County, 
Bristol County, . 
Essex County, 
Franklin County, 
Hampden County, 
Hampshire County, 
Middlesex County, 
Norfolk County, 
Plymouth County, 
Suffolk County, 
Worcester County, 


3 
3 
8 

5 

15 
2 
2 

19 
6 


1 

5 
8 
1 
5 
1 

12 
2 
1 

19 
4 


4 

8 
16 

1 
10 

1 

27 
4 

3 

38 
10 


1 

1 

1 

2 


1 

1 

1 
4 

2 


1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

5 
4 


3 
3 
8 

6 

15 

3 
2 
20 
8 


1 

6 
8 
1 
6 
1 

13 
2 
2 

23 
6 


4 

9 
16 

1 
12 

1 
28 

5 

4 
43 
14 


Totals 


63 


59 


122 


5 


10 


15 


68 


69 


137 


Cities or large towns (10,000or over), 
Country districts (under 10,000), 


45 
18 


46 
13 


91 
31 


3 
2 


7 
3 


10 

5 


48 
20 


53 
16 


101 

36 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 





Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 






DO 
3 






s 


m 




3 


.2 




00 

55 
"3 


"3 
S 


e| 
O 


CO 


"3 
6 


"eS 
O 


"3 


"3 
§ 


"3 




a 


0) 
p£| 








H 






I 




25 


21 


46 


54 


44 


98 


79 


65 


144 


Married, 


2 


3 


5 


7 


7 


14 


9 


10 


19 


Widowed, 




1 


1 




7 


7 




8 


8 


Divorced, 








2 


1 


3 


2 




3 


Totals 


27 


25 


52 


63 


59 


122 


90 


84 


174 



1910/ 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



39 



6. — Occupations of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 
Males. 





V 




a 


1 




I 


§ 






■ 


a 




- 


r. 




Blacksmith, 


_ 


1 


i 


Laborer, . 


- 


5 


5 


Bookkeeper, 


— 


1 


i 


Leather cutter, 


— 


1 


1 


Brakeman, 


- 


1 


i 


Mill operative, 


— 


3 


3 


Brick mason, . 


_ 


1 
1 


i 


rtanroacl man, 


— 


1 


1 


Cash boy, 


- 




i 


Scholar, 


- 


2 


2 


Clerk, 




n 






Shoemaker, 


1 






Chair maker, . 




1 


1 


Stableman, 




1 




Cook, 


1 




1 


Watch maker, . 




1 




Farmer, 




2 


2 


Waiter, . 


- 


2 


2 


General Electric 








Weaver, . 




1 


1 


Company, fore- 








Teamster, 




2 


2 


man, 


1 




1 


Xo occupation, 


23 


29 


52 


Hostler, . 


1 




1 




















Kitchen man, . 




1 


1 


Totals, 


27 


63 


90 



Females. 



Bookkeeper, 




1 


1 


Paper mills, 








Boxmaker, 




1 


1 


Scholar, . 


2 






Domestic, 


i 




12 


Stenographer, . 


_ 






General Electric 








Salesgirl, . 








Company, . 




1 


1 


Tailoress, 








Housekeeper, . 


I 


2 


3 


Xo occupation, 


20 


28 


48 


Housewife, 




7 


7 




















Laundress, 




1 


1 


Totals, . . 


25 


59 


84 


Milliner, . 






1 1 









WIFE OR DAUGHTER OF — 



Assistant bank cash- 








Machinist, 


1 


2 


3 


ier, 




1 


1 


Night watchman. . 


1 


3 


4 


Bank receiver, 




1 


1 


Tailor, . 




2 


2 


Brick layer, 




1 


1 


Teamster, 




1 


1 


Carpenter, 


2 




2 


Tinsmith, 




1 


1 


Cigar maker, . 




1 


1 


Tollman, . 


_ 




1 


Farmer, 




2 


2 


Unknown, 


20 


-41 


61 


Laborer, . 


1 


1 


2 


















Lineman, . 




1 


1 


Totals, 


25 


59 


84 



40 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



-i 

i 



I 

I 



«3 



•sajBraaj 



lOMNN I CO CM i 



<M ~h — CM | CM >— l 



•S^OX 



£ 1 
32 



■'3 



■ 1 



■ | 



8 s 



III 1 ^ 1 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



2 So 

8 



0> § 



I oo i r i i ~4 i i i 



g S3 

2 



S' 



:dHHUia 

-i*$SSSSSS$S2 

Mi 



« 



42 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



8. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



EXCITING CAUSES. 



Insane. 

Physical: — 
Electric shock, 
Injury to head, . 
Sunstroke, . 

Totals, 
Unknown, . 
Totals, . 



Admitted. 



Sane. 

Physical: — 

Injury to head 

Over exercise, 

Operation on hand, .... 

Fright, 

Gastritis, 

Scald 

Cerebral hemorrhage, 

Acute infection, 

Cerebro-spinal meningitis, 
Overheating, followed by swim, 

Sunstroke, 

Sickness of mother during pregnane*}-, 
Dentition 

Totals 

Unknown, 

Totals 

Aggregates 

Unknown, 

Aggregates, 



Predisposing Causes. 



HEREDITARY NEUROTIC 1; ALCOHOLIC 
TENDENCY. TENDENCY. I! TENDENCY. 



15 



1910. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



I | | | | O CO N LOM 



CM CM T-i 



I | | | | ^ n io c. 

1-1 CM CM 



"tf CM 



i-H 00 



00 CM 



^ eg 



»o 

01 O 



I I I I I l>- CO 00 CM O 
CM CM CO CM 



| | | | T^OJIOICH 



I I I I I co co c: 



to 



CO l> 



CM 2 
CM P 
^ CM 



CM 



CO £- 



I I I I I CM CO O CO CM 



I I I I I H | 



I I I I | t— I CO O 00 



OS CO 
CO 



CM LO 
CM 



I CM I I I I I I I I 



I >o I I I I I I I I 

CM 



I l> I I I I I I I I 
CM 



CM | 



CM 



CM 



CM <p 
© 



>o o 



S5 q 



CM CO 
O 



iO CO 
CM 1—1 

O 



CO 

o 



£ 

o. 

>> 

C 
C 

. o 

aT «T «T ^ 
• +5 4j 4i «j oq as co • •• • H 

2 ^ o o o c _ 

.^SSS^^^^ . .. . g 

„ O i-h 1-HCMC5 - - § 

c3Sooooooo>. ^ rT r3 

*S H rHMCO-H(NiOOS "O S) 

o o 2 > o > 



44 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



cm^ 



o o o 

CO CO CM 



NiOH CO CO CO 

co i> co 



r-i i-{ 00 



tO i—( 

CM 



OS C5 CM 



CM 



CM CM CM 



CO CO CM 



C3 

CO 

.£ 



O CO 

CM 



CO CO CO 
CM CM i-i 



CM 



©OS I>- i-H i— I 



© 



OS I 



H t-I OS 

CM CM i-i 



CM CM O 



© © © 



I I 



I I 



to to to 



I I I 



to to to 



CM CM i-l 



iQiC CO 



1^ 

CM 



CO CO i-i 



to to tH 



CO CO CM 



og 
3& 



35 



I I 



I I 



I I 



I I I 



I I I 



I I 



I .h K Q. 
Oh O CO 

o ^ ° 

g-P.22^ 

• r- r< CO 

■S -2 ^ ^ 

11 §1 

o 

7 



p 

co O 

CP CO 



o o 



o3 

Oh O CO 

cp .3 a>p3 
09 



CO 

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co O 

CD CO 
CO 5-1 

c3 CP 
o P_ 



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HH 



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rP 

>> 
P 

o3 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 45 



11. — Causes of Death. 



CAUSES. 

• 


Insane. 


Sane. 


Totals. 


3 

a 


1 

Females. 


Totals. 


s 


Females. 


Totals. 


M 


Females. 


Totals. 


Nervous system : — 




















Status pnilpntinus 


5 


2 


7 


2 


1 


3 


7 


3 


10 


Epilepsy, 


2 


3 




2 




*j 


4 




10 


TJrflin p.vst 








1 






1 




1 


Brain abscess, 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


-L VCo LJJ.1 CL LUI V D V o LCJL11 . 




















jjuuai |jxiv> LiiiiwiiitX ? . • • • 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 




4 


- 


4 


Pulmonary edema, .... 


1 




1 




— 




1 




1 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 


3 


2 


% 


1 






4 


2 




Rronphn-nnpumnnin 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


Circulatory system : — 






















1 


1 


2 








1 




2 


TVTvn p t\ vr\ i f i <? 








- 


1 


1 




1 


1 


Genito-urinary system : — 




















Interstitial nephritis, 










1 








* 1 


General : — 




















Carcinoma of the face, 










1 








1 


Accidental scalding by hot water, . 










1 








1 


Digestive system : — 




















Acute dilatation of the stomach, . 




1 


1 












1 


Intestinal paralysis, .... 




1- 


1 












1 


Totals, 


14 


11 


25 


9 


10 


19 


23 


21 


44 



46 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



ALL OTHER ADMISSIONS. 


Whole Known 
Period 
of Hospital 
Residence. 


eiB^oj, 


1 1 1 1 1 1 i-i ec co I 


*" 1 


7 

112.28 




~ ~ ' 


CM 1 


CM 




1 1 1 1 1 1 i CM CM 1 


lO | 


OS 


Whole Known Period 
op Disease. 


>• 
to 
p. 
H 
■J 

E 

H 


s^ox 


— - - 


t*- 1 


7 

299.14 


•sareinajj 




CM | 


CM CM 

co 


•sarBjv 


, 1 I . 1 I 1 ~ - * 


lO I 


lO 

OS 
CM 


insanity. 1 


•sjtJiox 


1 CM | | | | *~< i—i CO 1 




OS 


•sarEtnaj 


1 ' — > I 1 1 1 1 1 - — ■ 1 


CM 1 


CM CM 

s 


•sajcj^ 


i^i i i i to m 


1 3 


FIRST ADMITTED TO ANY HOSPITAL. 


Whole Duration of Attack. 


epilepsy. 


s^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 lH | <N — CM 


ec 1 


CM 

CO CO 

JO 
CO 


•sajBmaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 | »H •© «H 


t~- | 


7 

168.28 


•sarejt 


1 1 1 1 1 »H | >H CO -H 


OS 1 


9 

165.33 


insanity. 


•SJB}OX 


1 CM .-< CM 1 CO UO CO 1 1 


CO 1 


16 


•sarBtnaj 


| | T-t »-« | - M M H | | 


t» 1 


■e 

r- oo 




1 | <-H I rH CO C« I 1 


cs i 


CM 

os 

CO 
CO 


Hospital 
Residence. 


•SIB^OX 


I cs h cs | co io co | | j CO | 


16 

34. 15 


•sareraaj 


1 | | eM CM ^ | | 


r— | 


t- 00 

o 

CO 


•sarBfli 


1 CM 1 1 ^ CO CM 1 1 


os 1 


CM 

OS t- 

o 

CO 


Duration before Admission. 


epilepsy. 


•ei^ox | ' ' ' ' ' "* °* ~ ' 


16 
16 

141.37 


•ea^raaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 rt tt» | 


r» 1 


7 

147.42 


sajBj^ 


1 1 1 1 | _ _ co 1 


CS 1 


9 

136.66 


insanity. 1 


•sp^ox 


1 CO 1 I I I I 1 1 1 


O 1 


CO US 


•sareuiaj 


1 *» I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


r- | j t» to 


•sarBjv 


1 Oft 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


OS 1 j OS lO 


PERIOD. 


Congenital, . . . - 
Under 1 month, . 
From 1 to 3 months, . 

3 to 6 months, . 

6 to 12 months, . 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, 
Over 20 years, 

Totals 

Unknown, .... 

Totals 

Average of known cases (in 
months). 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



47 



» O ** 



— * « GO M 



3 S 



f J! h ■ 

<M o o O 

«s H _£ r-< 

? | 



£ a 



Public Document No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Monson State Hospital 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER) , 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1911. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1912. 



Public Document 



No. 62 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



Monson State Hospital 

(POST-OFFICE AND RAILROAD STATION, PALMER), 



Year ending November 30, 1911, 




/J^ BOSTON: 
WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1912. 



ikmi 1 



ATE WCUfc. t-C*TO* 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



mi 

8. 

CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, . • 5 

Trustees' Report, 7 

Superintendent's Report, 12 

General Information, . .21 

Articles made and repaired in the Sewing Room, ... 22 

Work done in the Industrial Room, 24 

Farm Products, 25 

Treasurer's Report, 27 

Statistical Tables, 35 



MONSON 



OFFICERS 

OF THE 

State Hospital. 



WILLIAM X. BULLARD 
MABEL W. STEDMAX, . 
HEXRY P. JAQUES, M.D., . 
MARY B. TOWXSLEY, Secretary 
JOHX BAPST BLAKE. M.D.. 
EDWARD P. BAGG, . 
MICHAEL I. SHEA, M.D.. 



TRUSTEES. 

M.D., Chairman. 



Boston. 

Brooklixe. 

Lexox. 

Sprixgfield. 

Bostox. 

HOLTOKE. 

Chicopee Falls 



RESIDENT 

EVERETT FLOOD, M.D., 
MORGAX B. HODSKIXS, M.D., . 
ALDEX V. COOPER, M.D., . 
FREDERICK W. GUILD, M.D.. . 
EDMUND S. DOUGLASS, M.D., . 
AMY C. CLIFTOX 

CHARLES F. SIMOXDS, . 
GEORGE E. BATES, .... 



OFFICERS. 

Superintendent. 

Assistant Physician. 

Assistant Physician. 

Assistant Physician. 

Assistant Physician. 

Assistant Superintendent and 

Matron to Children's Colony. 
Steward and Storekeeper. 
Engineer. 



SARAH E. SPALDIXG Clerk and Treasurer. 

MARIOX COLLIXS Field Worker. 



NONRESIDENT OFFICERS. 

Dr. E. G. Brackett, Consulting Orthopedic Surgeon. 



She (Cnnmuittntealth nf iHaHsarhitfirtts. 



TRUSTEES* REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The past year has been one of quiet growth and increase in the 
hospital, without any striking accidents or occurrences in the 
administration. 

The superintendent has had his usual summer vacation. 

In October, 1911, Dr. Michael I. Shea of Chicopee was appointed 
trustee in the place of Dr. Scofield of Dalton, whose term had 
expired. Dr. Shea has therefore had no share in the work of the 
preceding year and no responsibility for any occurrences therein. 
The trustees desire to place on record their appreciation of the 
services of Dr. Walter W. Scofield on the Board. Peculiarly fitted 
by his hospital experience to determine questions of State hos- 
pital administration, his advice was always sought and his opinion 
was sound and of much weight. The trustees sincerely regret his 
absence from the Board. 

There has been no change among the assistant physicians except 
in the case of Mr. L. B. Alford, research officer and assistant 
physician, who completed his term of service on Aug. 29, 1911. 
He left the hospital at his own request in order to complete his 
medical studies, and to the regret of the trustees, who had found 
his work very interesting and valuable. 

Miss Danielson completed her term of service on July 3, and 
since then no field worker has been employed until within the last 
few weeks. Miss Marion Collins arrived from Xew York, where 
she had been trained, to perform this very important work on 
heredity, and the trustees now have under consideration the 
question of retaining her, the only serious difficulty being that of 
cost. 



s 



MOXSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Mr. Walter E. Hatch, who has been clerk and treasurer since 
Aug. 27, 1907, resigned, and Miss Sarah E. Spalding, chief clerk, 
has been chosen to fill these positions. 

The appropriations for the year 1910 were as follows: — 

For an extension of the laundry and suitable machinery, . . $15,000 
To enlarge the refrigerating facilities and to fireproof certain 

floors, 3,000 

$18,000 

Both these appropriations were much needed, and the work 
hereby permitted has been begun and is being rapidly carried on. 

The extension of the sewerage system, for which $6,000 was 
appropriated in 1909, will soon be completed. It has involved 
the laying of sewer tile from the Farm group for a considerable 
distance along the side of the hill and the formation of the filter 
beds. The first portion of the work has been finished; two of 
the filter beds will be ready for use shortly, and work on the third 
will be carried on through the winter. 

The trustees have voted to ask for the following special appro- 
priations this year : — 



Employees' cottage, . . • $6,000 

Cottage at Farm group, 3,500 

Ice house, 1,000 

Cow barn, . 5,000 



$15,500 

There are various other objects for which appropriations must 
eventually be asked, but the trustees do not desire to ask now 
for anything but what is immediately needed. The needs of the 
future must wait. 

The important problem in relation to the power house is fully 
given in detail in the superintendent's report herewith submitted. 
It seems probable that it will be necessary in the near future to 
enlarge our power plant and to change its location. The ques- 
tions involved in this matter are now the subject of careful study 
and investigation by the Board. 



.1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



9 



The Children's Colony. 

Early in October, 1910, the children's colony was opened with 
6 boys. Before the 1st of November 7 more were admitted, and 
by the 1st of December the total admissions of boys had been 40. 

The girls' building was opened in the last of November, 1910, 
with 13 girls. On the 1st of January, 1911, there were 75 children 
in the colony, — 40 boys and 35 girls. 

At the present time there are in this group 53 boys and 66 girls, 
— 119 in all. 

This group has been placed under the special care of Miss 
Clifton, assistant superintendent, who reports directly to the 
superintendent, Dr. Flood. 

The school in this group was started in November, 1910. The 
morning is devoted to the more feeble-minded, who are able to 
do only kindergarten work. They learn to sing, march, string 
beads, cut and paste pictures and other things adapted to their 
powers. 

In the afternoon those children are taught who can learn at 
least something. 

The problem of the education of children of the class with whom 
we have to deal is a very serious and somewhat complicated 
one. 

We have two great practical divisions for these children as 
regards primary school education : first, those who can learn prac- 
tically nothing because of mental impairment, the lower and some 
of the middle-grade feeble-minded — these are called in other insti- 
tutions the custodial cases; second, those who can learn some- 
thing — school cases. 

As regards the custodial cases, our problem is simple. For the 
lower grade cases little can be done, nor is it worth while to attempt 
much of anything beyond certain kindergarten work in the way 
of teaching. The higher grade custodial cases may possibly, some 
of them, be able eventually to do some manual work. Farm work 
is, however, probably the best occupation for most of them as 
they grow older. 

In regard to the school cases, these may again be roughly divided 
into two categories: (1) those who are distinctly feeble-minded, 
middle or high grade, in addition to their epilepsy; (2) those whose 



10 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



minds are clear or only partially clouded through epilepsy and who 
are not otherwise feeble-minded. 

It is not the purpose of the trustees to receive in this hospital 
except under special circumstances, children who are, and are 
likely to be, capable of attending the public school and profiting 
by such attendance. 

The children of the first category of school cases should be edu- 
cated as far as possible similarly to those with an equal state of 
mental deficiency in the State institutions for the feeble-minded, 
due allowance, however, being made for the fact that they are also 
epileptic. 

It is with the children of the second category that the most 
serious educational questions are presented. These children can 
learn and sometimes appear to learn quite readily, but after a 
time, especially if their attacks have been at all numerous, they 
forget all they have learnt for some period previously, and at the 
end of the year are no farther, perhaps less, advanced than at the 
beginning. The value of the ordinary school education is for such 
children very problematical. The time ordinarily given to this 
should in the case of these children be devoted to manual training. 
This has proved a greater success with this class than the ordi- 
nary intellectual work. 

This will probably in the future be thoroughly tested until we 
can definitely determine for what kinds of manual labor our 
epileptics are best fitted. 

Research Work. 

The special research work, begun by Dr. Annie E. Taft, has 
been carried to completion during the past year by Mr. L. B. 
Alford, who has in addition turned his attention to certain col- 
lateral questions with most valuable and interesting results. The 
investigations which have been carried on by Dr. Taft and Mr. 
Alford have been of much importance, and have apparently set- 
tled some debatable questions. 

Miss Danielson, the field worker, has accomplished much im- 
portant investigation into heredity and kindred subjects. Many 
valuable records have been obtained and filed. It seems advis- 
able that this work should be continued, and the Board is now 
considering the possibility of doing this. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



11 



It seems important that the aims and the accomplishments of 
the hospital should be known as widely as possible to the public 
as a whole, as well as to the medical profession of the State and 
of the country. For the purpose of accomplishing this, the hos- 
pital has issued a short statement of its aims and its needs for 
general distribution. It also is glad to receive visitors, both lay 
and medical, and the trustees have readily consented to have 
medical and scientific societies meet occasionally at the hospital. 

In May a meeting of the department of eugenics of the Ameri- 
can Breeders' Association was held at the hospital, and in July 
the Hampden District Medical Society met there. Classes from 
Amherst College and from Clark University have visited the hos- 
pital with their instructors to see and study the conditions. 

WILLIAM X. BULLARD, Chairman. 

For the Trustees. 



12 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 

I hereby submit my annual report for the year ending Nov. 30, 
1911. 

The appropriations for the year 1909 have been fully used with 
the exception of that for the extension of the sewerage system. 
This work has involved laying sewer tile to the Farm group and 
digging the trench for a long distance along the side hills, to get 
the proper pitch. This part of the work is now completed. The 
beds for filtration as planned are considerably larger than our 
immediate needs require and will no doubt supply the demands 
for a great many years to come. The embankments have been 
completed, the underdrains are all in and two of these beds will 
be ready for use within a few weeks. The work on another one 
will be carried on during the winter when the weather is favor- 
able, and will no doubt be completed within a reasonable time. 

The appropriations asked for the present year were: (1) for the 
extension of the laundry, and for fitting up with further machinery, 
$15,000; (2) to enlarge the refrigerating facilities and to fireproof 
certain floors, $3,000. These were approved and the work has 
been promptly undertaken. The third appropriation for which 
we asked was $25,000 to extend our present dining-room building. 
This was not passed, and it has not seemed advisable to renew the 
application this year, though the need is a pressing one. 

In studying the appropriations for the coming year, several very 
important matters have been considered. One of the most desir- 
able would be to locate the boiler plant in such a position that coal 
may be delivered direct from the railroad. This would involve 
an extension of our mains for several hundred feet, but the cost 
of doing this would not be very large. We should obtain for our 
use the present industrial room and carpenter shop, where suit- 
able rooms for married couples could be made. The present boiler 
house would make an admirable place for the carpenter shop, and 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



13 



with the floor extended from the machine shop we should have 
under the same roof a very much needed enlargement for our 
industries. The engine room would make a suitable place for 
the paint shop, which is now not properly provided for. This 
arrangement would also give us suitable return in the heating 
plant from the Clough building, and would make it feasible to 
build another building for patients, north of the Clough building, 
and houses for employees on the gravel bank still farther north. 
These could all be heated from the boiler plant. 

Another argument in favor of this change is that our present 
stack is too small for our purpose and another one will soon be 
needed. Some boilers need renewing, and a portion of the main 
steam piping needs overhauling, so that considerable expense on 
the plant will be necessary; and it seems highly advisable that 
this outlay should be made in a location better adapted to our 
coming needs. This matter is left over this year for further study. 

The appropriations which I have recommended to your Board 
are as follows : — 

1. An employees' cottage for a married couple and 7 male 
employees as lodgers, similar to our Farm group No. 4, at a cost 
of $6,000. 

2. An employees' cottage for a married couple and 2 lodgers, 
to be used in connection with the Farm cottage plant, at a cost 
of $3,500. 

3. An ice house at a cost of $1,000. We are practically com- 
mitted to the use of natural ice, and with this added storage 
capacity it seems probable that we can store ice enough to pro- 
vide for all our refrigerating purposes. It is thought desirable to 
locate this building in the vicinity of the present coal sheds, so 
that we may be able to fill from the river; or, in case that plan 
is not possible, to cut the ice at a more distant point and bring it 
in on cars. This location would render the delivering of ice in 
the summer time as convenient as we could hope to have it. 

4. A cow barn located at the proper site near our Farm group 
buildings. The cost of this cow barn has been estimated at 
$5,000. The present cow barn has been repaired many times and 
is now an expensive building to maintain. It seems very desir- 
able to have the cows cared for near the other cow barns, and 
many useful purposes will be served by this additional building. 



14 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



The various industries have been faithfully carried on and the 
workers in these departments deserve commendation. The work 
which is a daily necessity, such as the laundry, kitchen, dining 
room, ward work, etc., has occupied the usual numbers. In addi- 
tion to this, an extra amount of work has been done in the fol- 
lowing departments: stone crusher work, fruit evaporating, rug 
making, boot and shoe making, cobbling, farm work of all kinds, 
grading, road and path making. 

The surfacing of an additional piece of farm road has been 
carried out as in the two preceding years, under the efficient 
management of the Monson authorities, the crushed stone coming 
from our patients' efforts at the stone crusher. Many lengths of 
steam main and water pipes have been laid and tunnel work of 
considerable extent accomplished near each building. A careful 
map of our whole territory has been made with accurate location 
of all pipes for water, sewer, steam, etc. At Farm cottage, Farm 
group and the children's colony much needed grading, with catch 
basins and surface drainage, has been partly completed, and many 
trees have been set out, etc. With these various lines of work 
the appearance of the grounds has improved and the value of the 
plant materially increased. 

With the idea of supplementing our present supply of unmetered 
water, we have made four test wells in the valley. The result 
shows that in several localities plenty of water can be obtained 
which may be readily piped into our old system. The quality of 
the water is as good as the surface water we now use from the two 
reservoirs, and is well suited for use in the barns, the boiler house, 
laundry and for flushing the toilets. The time is likely to come 
when this source of supply will be needed for these purposes and 
the wells can be driven and connections made with very little 
delay at any time in the future. 

The general field of work completed for the social worker is 
briefly outlined as follows: — 

1. Purpose, to secure basis for social work: (a) for wise legislation in 
regard to defectives; (6) for education of public to prevent unfit mat- 
ings; (c) to prevent the economic waste involved in caring for defectives 
and their offspring; (d) to prevent the increase of epileptic, feeble-minded 
and insane; (e) to finally eradicate epileptic, feeble-minded and insane, 
or control it as has been done with small-pox and tuberculosis. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



15 



2. This basis secured by study of heredity in man: (a) we have knowl- 
edge of probabilities in breeding cattle and corn; (b) breeding of human 
race has been neglected; (c) in forming scientific theories the method is 
to secure data of individual cases, then discover the laws which they 
follow; (d) field worker investigates problems connected with special 
patients and their families. Results are charted and descriptions of indi- 
viduals written. 

3. The social work is incidental, but important: (a) establishes pleas- 
ant relations between family and institution; (6) keeps institution in 
touch with discharged patients; (c) useful information as to advisability 
of patient returning home; (d) may relieve cases of distress by reporting 
them to proper authorities. 

4. Eugenics worker v. social worker: (a) social worker working for 
general good by relieving individual cases; (b) eugenics worker is seeking 
to cut off supply of individuals not capable of caring for themselves. 

5. To bring the hospital and its management into closer touch with 
friends and relatives of the patient to the advantage of both. Also to 
remedy, if possible, defects in the home surroundings of the patient. 

6. By field workers who could at the same time bring back valuable 
data for records. 

7. Accurate histories and a knowledge of the home surroundings of 
the patient. When the field worker is in the neighborhood could call on 
relatives of the patient, thus keeping in touch with conditions, and in 
time supplying us with exact data in relation to heredity. 

8. An idea that the hospital is really taking an interest in the patients. 

9. (a) Case histories; (6) general progress of patient towards recovery 
and many other matters; (c) general supervision. 

10. In the case of the boarded out, the social worker is well equipped 
to keep supervision of the case, and in other cases may well help to keep 
the family informed as to the progress of the case in the hospital. 

11. The tendency to sterility has only become manifest after an end- 
less amount of mischief has been done. The acquirement of venereal 
diseases and their dissemination among persons of naturally better con- 
dition have been marked features. 

Our experience with the field worker has been for little more 
than one year. The cost has averaged about $50 per month for 
the traveling and maintenance expenses. If we employed her 
independently of the eugenics record office this would be increased 
to SI 25 per month. Even at this price the results seem to warrant 
such an outlay. 

At the children's colony, the first death occurred in January, a 
boy who had been in feeble condition for some time. Five other 
deaths have occurred since then; 2 of them were boys and 3 were 
girls. 



16 



MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



In the schools some do not advance much in their work, but an 
effort is made to have them remember what they already know. 
Quite a little attention is paid to letter writing in order that the 
boy or girl may be able to write an intelligent letter home. 

Each patient who is able has some regular work to do, and is 
encouraged to keep at it until the work is completed or the recrea- 
tion time arrives. The girls are learning to sew and mend, and 
do a great deal of the mending. 

So many younger children have been admitted to this hospital 
that it became necessary in October of this year to use one of the 
wards in the girls' building for a nursery. The older girls enjoy 
helping in the care of nursery children, and it serves to keep them 
employed as well. 

There has been very little sickness except that caused by con- 
vulsions. 

The condition of our barns and stock is sufficiently evident by 
the following extracts from a letter of the Chief of the Cattle 
Bureau and from his district agent, under dates of Xov. 14, 1910, 
and Sept. 30, 1911. 

It affords me great pleasure to report that I found little, if anything, 
to criticize. The health condition of the herd is excellent. The methods 
emploj r ed in the care of the cattle are simple and practical, and evidence 
their value in the results obtained. Your barn buildings are not all of 
the modern, up-to-date, sanitary and hygienic type, but you are proving 
that it is possible to keep a herd in first-class condition without the aid 
of ultra-scientific surroundings. The average farmer, who cannot afford 
to build in accordance with the latest fads in sanitary construction, may 
find in the results you achieve with somewhat old-fashioned surround- 
ings encouragement to make the best of what he has. 

I must not omit a word of congratulation on the appearance of the 
swine I found at the Monson institution. They are in splendid shape, 
and I was pleased to note that they are being handled on a business basis, 
and must be returning you a substantial profit. 

I was glad to have the opportunity to inspect your stock. The Bureau, 
of which I have very recently been made the head, should keep in touch 
with conditions through personal inspection. The State, which has estab- 
lished this Bureau, holds it responsible, and the condition of the herds 
of all State institutions, especially those having the care of the physically 
unfortunate, should be above suspicion. I have asked your superintend- 
ent to keep in frequent touch with this office, giving from time to time 
information as to the condition of the herd, a request I am sure you will 
approve. . . . 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



17 



The present stable, while fairly sanitary in its arrangement, might be 
improved upon in several particulars. The present location, directly 
opposite the administrative office of the institution, is objectionable from 
the sanitary as well as the aesthetic point of view. Naturally, flies that 
develop in the excrement about the buildings in which animals are stabled 
find ready access into near-by buildings occupied by the officers or inmates 
of the institution. A more modern stable upon a site better adapted for 
such a building would considerably lessen the expense connected with 
the care of the animals, storage of forage and handling of manure. In 
addition, much of the fertilizing material of the manure that is now lost 
might be saved by having well-constructed manure pits or conveniences 
for its storage. In a more modern type of stable, with milk room adjoin- 
ing, the production of a milk of higher grade would be facilitated. 

The herd of cattle was found to be in a very satisfactory condition. 
There were no evidences of the existence of serious disease, and a careful 
physical examination of the individual animals did not indicate the pres- 
ence of a single tuberculous cow. Two cows in the herd, both well along 
in years, one of which has a slight lameness, the other somewhat emaciated, 
should, I believe, be removed from the herd because of their being unprofit- 
able, rather than for anything connected with their slight ailments. The 
large proportion of the animals are of high grade and all show the effects 
of good feeding, care and stabling. 

A physical examination of the 142 head of hogs in the herd showed them 
to be free from disease and in fine condition. The individual animals, 
without exception, were of good size, thrifty and vigorous. 



Clergymen who have held Service. 



Rev. George A. Andrews. 
Rev. Francis S. Brewer. 
Rev. Abram Conklin. 
Rev. William Hart . 
Rev. C. N. Heermans. 



Rev. Charles Hill. 

Dr. J. S. Lemon. 

Rev. T. D. Martin. 

Rev. H. W. Smith. 

Rev. Charles W. William; 



Amusements. 

Baseball games, 34; dances, 50; dancing school, 20; enter- 
tainments, 4; excursions to fair, 3; excursions to lake, 36; mas- 
querade, 1 ; moving pictures, 8. 



IS 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Gifts. 




Place. 


Article. 


Mrs. L. Brainerd, 


Palmer 


Scr»pbooks. 


Mrs. J. F. Holbrook, . 


Palmer 

Springfield, 


Magazines. 


Mrs. M. B. Townsley, . 


Magazines. 


Mrs. George Ezekiel, 




Magazines. 


Miss Grace Pitts 


Athol 


Valentines. 


Mrs. D. E. Marcy, 


Palmer, .... 


Magazines. 


Kev. William ±iart, 




Magazines. 


Palmer Social and Business Club, 




Magazines. 


Mrs. C. A. Matthews, 


Conway, .... 


Magazines. 


Rev. Abram Conklin, . 


Monson, .... 


Children's cards and magazines. 


Mrs. H. C. Plummer, . 


East Boston, . 


Clothing. 


Christopher Eldredge, 


Monson State Hospital, . 


.Books (.7 J. 


Mr. D. F. Marcy, 


Palmer, . ... 


Magazines. 


Dr. William N. Bullard, 


Boston 


Dolls (8). 


Miss M. Leary, .... 


Thorndike, 


Clothing. 


Mr. S. Cushman 


Monson, .... 


Magazines and periodicals. 


Dr. Henry F'.ynn, 
Mrs. L. F. Chandler, . 


Roxbury, 


Clothing. 




Magazines. 


Mrs. Harriet Bradley, . 


Monson 


Fiction, 18 books. 



Table showing Patients employed and in what Way. 





Men. 


Womeh. 


Administration building, 




5 


Bakery, 


7 




Barn, 


16 




Carpenter, 


1 




Dining room, 


25 


41 


Dispensary, 

Employees' cottage, 


1 




1 


5 


Engineer's department, 


2 




Farm, 


13 




Greenhouse, 


8 




Industrial building, 


23 




Kitchen, 


14 


32 


Laundry, 


15 


98 


Mason, 


2 




Nursery, 

Nurses' home, 




5 




7 


On roads, ■ 


31 




Painter, 


1 




Service building, 




1 


Sewing rooms, 




46 


Stone crusher, 


10 




Store, 


4 




Ward work, 


115 


120 


With yard man, 


37 




Totals, 


326 


360 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 19 



List of Graduates. 



Name. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Fannie C. Cronin, 


1901 


Monson State Hospital, supervisor, 


Palmer. 


Mary E. Kilduff, 


1901 




Springfield. 


Emma S. McKeever, . 


1901 


Matron at State Farm, . 


State Farm. 


Julia O'Brien, 


1901 




Roxbury. 


Edith E. Townsend, . 


1901 




Bragville, Me. 


Carroll W. Briggs, 


1902 


Boston City Hospital, . 


Boston. 


A. M. D. Manwarring, 


1902 




Averill Park, N. Y. 


Edwin S. Manwarring, 


1902 


_ 


Averill Park, N. Y. 


James L. McKeever, . 


1902 


State Farm, 


State Farm. 


Walter L. McKeever, . 


1902 


_ 


Middletown, Conn. 


Hattie Edith Rowe, . 


1902 


_ 


Georgetown, Me. 


Alice B. Smith, . 


190? 


Bookkeeping, .... 


Medford. 


Marguerite Casey, 


1903 


Private nursing 


Burlington, Vt. 


Catherine Daley, 


1903 


Connecticut Hospital for Insane, . 


Middleton, Conn. 


Georgia A. Nute, 


1903 


Stamford Hall, .... 


Stamford, Conn. 


fipnrcrp TT "Flvnt 


1903 


Motorman . 


Pfilm.6r« 


Mae D. Brown, . 


1905 


Private nursing, 


Portland, Me. 


Annie A. Caldwell, . 


1905 




Springfield. 


Louis A. Fontaine, 


1905 


_ 


Palmer. 


Frank L. Morway, 


1905 


Apothecary, Monson State Hos- 


Palmer. 






pital. 




Christine McClellan, . 


1906 


Married, . .... 


Prince Edward Island. 


Lutie F. Campbell, 


1907 


Private nursing, 


Boston. 


Theresa Brown, . 


1907 




Portland, Me. 


Mary G. Hancock, 


1907 




Holyoke. 


Mrs. Anna Woodward, 


1907 


Private nursing 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Elizabeth McCarthy, . 


1907 


Monson State Hospital, assistant 


Palmer. 






supervisor. 




Samuel E. Chase, 


1907 


Brattleboro Retreat, nurse, . 


Brattleboro, Vt. 


William L. Paine, 


1907 


Monson State Hospital, nurse, 


Palmer. 


Edith M. Brooks, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Watertown, N. Y. 


Eva G. Caldwell, 


1908 


Private nursing 


Woodstock, N. B. 


Mary J. Caldwell, 


1908 


Private nursing 


Springfield. 


Susan E. Crumb, 


1908 




Watertown, N. Y. 


Daisy I. Dowling, 


1908 


Private nursing 


North Middleborough. 


Olla G. Dowling, 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Brockton. 


Dora L. Jaques, . 


1908 


Private nursing, .... 


Presque Isle, Me. 


Agnes M. Millen, 


1908 




Syracuse, N. Y. 


Anna L. Millen, . 


1908 


Private nursing 


Salem. 


Katherine C. Murray, 


1908 


Married 


Dorchester. 



20 MOXSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 

List of Graduates — Concluded. 



Name. 


Class. 


Occupation. 


Address. 


Mae I. Perkins, . 


1908 


Married, 


Springfield. 


Nellie F. Brown, 


1909 


Married 


Moosup, Conn. 


Mary S. Campbell, 


1909 


Private nursing 


Springfield. 


Katberine Donovan, . 


1909 


Private nursing, .... 


New York City. 


Ermina E. Drennan, . 


1909 


Sanatorium, nurse, 


Brookline. 


Ruth C.Clark, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


Worcester. 


S. Helen Dickinson, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


Calgary, Alta. 


Alma T. Gray, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


Newton. 


Cora T. Grabam, 


1910 


Private nursing 


New York City. 


Ida H. Graham, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


New York City. 


Mrs. Bertha S. Hal 1 , . 


1910 


Pierce Farm, 


Mattapan. 


Maybel M. Jamieson, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


New York City. 


Katherine F. Knight, . 


1910 


Private nursing, .... 


Springfield. 


Annie L. McKay, 


1910 


At home, 


Shubenacadie, N. S. 


Margarette S. Macrae, 


1910 


Married, 


Pine Plains, N. Y. 


Ivy M. Corey, 


1911 


Private nursing 


St. John, N. B. 


Alice E. Cox, 


1911 


Teaching school 


Gardner. 


Alice D. Small, . 


1911 


Private nursing, .... 


Calgary, Alta. 


Gertrude Tapley, 


1911 


Monson State Hospital, nurse, 


Palmer. 


Ruth E. Turner, 


1911 


Rhode Island General Hospital, . 


Providence, R. I. 



The nurses have worked aw T ay from the hospital eight and one- 
eighth days. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT FLOOD, 

Superintendent. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



21 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Methods of Admission. 

1. The regular insane commitment, such as is used at the insane 
hospital. 

2. Two forms of commitment: (a) voluntary admission, requir- 
ing the certificate of one doctor. The doctor's certificate must be 
certified by a justice; (6) commitment for those who are con- 
sidered dangerous epileptics, but not otherwise insane. 

Each patient is required to work as much as he is able. Patients 
are not allowed to go to town alone, nor to walk out alone. They 
are expected to live on plain diet, and to go to bed early. These 
restrictions are not irksome when they are fully understood. 

Patients' Clothing. 
The outfit requisite for a patient coming here is very much the 
same as would be needed at home. 

Location. 

The hospital is located in the town of Monson, but less than 1 
mile from the village of Palmer, so that Palmer is the address for 
all purposes. Palmer is on the Boston & Albany railroad, between 
Worcester and Springfield, and is at the junction of the Boston 
k Albany and the New London Northern division of the Central 
Vermont. The Ware River branch of the Boston & Albany rail- 
road has one terminus in Palmer, the other in Winchendon. 
Palmer is 84 miles from Boston, and the railroad fare is SI. 89. 



22 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



ARTICLES MADE AND REPAIRED IN THE 



SEWING 


ROOMS. 




IVIade. 




Napkins, .... 


. 136 




539 


Nightdresses, . 


. 403 


Belt 


1 


Nightshirts, 


. 381 


Bibs 


307 


Overalls (pairs), 


. 130 


Bread covers, . 


2 


Petticoats, 


. 70 


"RllVPCin QPf}TT<3 


114 


Piano cover, 


1 


"Rnrifil rnhps 

_L> 111 lal lUUCCj . . • 


5 


Pillow cushion cover, 


1 


Canvas bag, . . • . 


1 


Pillow slips, 


. 22 


ridns fnT nflf nirKT 
V^aj^Jo 1U1 (Ja/Ulllllg, . 


50 


Portieres (pairs), 


2] 


vyll<Xll CU V CI , • • • 


1 


Rompers (pairs), 


. 169 


(IViptyticipq 

V^llClillOCo, ... 


137 


Pugs, .... 


. 84 


f^VlppapplntTl POVPTS 
vyiiccoccnj tii v ci . 


6 


Shirts, .... 


. 25 


Cnatc* 


57 


Shirtwaists, 


. 99 


Tvpn Qn vo pmrPT 

V>\Jlll^JC110<xl C \j\J V CI , • 




Skirts, .... 


. 21 


f^nTSPt, POVPTS 


93 


Sofa pillows, 


8 


Cnvprinp* for rIpip - }! 


1 


Sofa pillow tops, 


4 






Stand covers, . 


. 54 


For bnnlrPfisp 


7 


Suits, .... 


7 


XJXJll^l lllllollll y^JOjlLOJj^ 


30 


Suspenders (pairs), 


. 256 


iVclLlieLliUl CCI.1 Lilill, 


i 


Table cloths, . 


. 67 


Sqcn mOlT'SI 

kJcioii ^^jciii a j , . . 




Towels, .... 


. 2,259 


OH CCll l/Uitdlllb, 


Q 


Tray cloths, 


. 22 




1 


Ticks, .... 


6 


TlTOWPTQ 1 ■nCHT'CJ 1 

JL/ldWClO ^^JdllQy, • • 


245 


Trousers (pairs), 


. 49 


Dresses, .... 


568 


Underwaists, . 


. 33 


Dusters (cloth), 


. 37 


Vests, .... 


. 47 


Finger cots, 


. 12 


» 




Flags, .... 


5 


Repaired. 




Garters, .... 


295 


Aprons, .... 


491 


Holders, .... 


177 


Bedspreads, 


10 


Hood, .... 


1 


Bibs, 


231 


Jumpers, .... 


63 




114 


Kimonos, .... 


6 


Blanket (horse), 


1 


Laundry bags, 


. 102 


Caps, .... 


2 


Masks, .... 


75 


Clothespin bags, 


5 


Mittens (pairs), 


. 376 


Coats, .... 


397 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 23 



Corset covers, . 


. 166 


Pillow slips, 


: 96 


Corsets, . 


. . 27 


Rompers, . 


. 213 


Drawers (pairs), 


. 1,503 


Rugs, 


12 


Dresses, . 


. 955 


Sheets, 


... 24 


Flag, .... 


1 


Shirts, 


. 1,911 


Jumpers, . 


. 340 


Shirtwaists, 


. 84 


Laundry bags, 


. 261 


Skirts, 


. 152 


Mattress covers, 


19 


Stockings (pairs), . 


. 4,500 


Mittens, . 


9 


Sweaters, . 


4 


Nightdresses, . 


. 621 


Table cloths, . 


. 92 


Nightshirts, 


17 


Towels, 


. 66 


Overalls, . 


. 641 


Trousers (pairs), 


. 865 


Petticoats, 


. 308 


Vests, 


. 42 



24 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



WORK DONE IN THE INDUSTRIAL ROOM. 



Articles Carved. 



Cemetery head marks, . 


10 


Sign boards, 


7 


Cut. 


• 


Coats, .... 


40 


Coat patterns, 


. 10 


Coats, summer, 


. 104 


Mittens (pairs), 


. 382 


Overalls, men's (pairs), . 


. 68 


Trousers (pairs), 


. 18 


Trouser patterns, . 


. 10 


Suits, .... 


10 


Vests, .... 


5 


Made. 




Cane, .... 


1 


Coat hangers, . 


. 246 


Checker boards, 


2 


Checkers, sets of, . 


2 


Chair cushions, 


2 


Envelopes, large : — 




For office, 


. 1,050 


For pills, . 


. 7,000 


Moccasins, men's (pairs), 


. 15 


Pillows made over, 


. 25 


Rugs, rope, 


. 40 


Shoes, women's (pairs), . 


2 


Slippers, men's (pairs), . 


. 588 


Marked. 




Shoes (pairs), . 


. 13 


Printed. 




Blanks, .... 


8,600 


Copies of essays and lectures, 1,575 


Envelopes, 


. 3,525 



Names, ..... 98 
Postal cards, . . . .150 
Programs, .... 2,000 
Tickets, 1,300 

Repaired. 

Blankets (horse), ... 2 

Baseball bases, ... 4 

Bridles, 2 

Camp stools, .... 5 

Carpets, 3 

Chairs, 4 

Chair cushions, .... 6 

Crutches (pairs), ... 2 

Footstools, .... 2 

Fire escapes, .... 4 

Harness straps, ... 3 
Mattresses, . . . .501 

Opera-glass case, 1 

Piano stools, .... 2 

Rugs, 11 

Shoes, 2,042 

Suit case, 1 

Truss, .... 1 
Umbrellas, . . . .145 

Reseated. 
Chairs, 56 



Sewed. 

Mangle aprons, . . . 16 

Upholstered. 
Barber chairs, .... 3 

Miscellaneous. 
One barrel of beans picked over. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 25 



FARM PRODUCTS. 



Apples, eating, 370£ barrels, at S2.50, S925 63 

Apples, cider, 294 bushels, at SO. 10, 29 40 

Apples, crab, 12 bushels, at S0.75, 9 00 

Beans, dry, 71 bushels, at $2.30, 16 48 

Beans, shell, 35 bushels, at S1.35, 47 25 

Beans, string, 184f bushels, at S0.90, 166 28 

Beef, 3,274 pounds, at SO. 10, 327 40 

Beets, 191£ bushels, at $0.60, 114 75 

Cabbage, llHi tons, at $25, 288 90 

Calves sold, 60, 198 15 

Carrots, 426 bushels, at $0.75, 319 50 

Cider, 720 gallons, at SO. 10, 72 00 

Corn, field, 355 bushels, at $0.75, 266 25 

Corn, sweet, 452 i 7 o bushels, at $1, 452 70 

Corn, green, 10 tons, ac $5, 50 00 

Cows sold, 2, 42 50 

Currants, 175 quarts, at $0.11, 19 25 

Cucumbers, 29£ boxes, at $0.75, 21 94 

Ensilage, 450 tons, at $4, 1,800 00 

Fodder, corn, 25 tons, at $5, 125 00 

Fodder, millet, 12 tons, at $5, 60 00 

Fodder, oat, 40 tons, at $5, 200 00 

Grapes, 96 pounds, at $0.04, 3 84 

Hay, 275 tons, at $21, 5,775 00 

Hides, 363 T V pounds, at S0.10, . 36 31 

Lettuce, 256£ pounds, at $0.50, 128 25 

Logs, 4, 45 00 

Milk, 285,219 quarts, at $0.06, 17,113 14 

Onions, 58£ bushels, at $1.10, 64 OS 

Parsnips, 264 bushels, at $0.75, 198 00 

Pears, 31f bushels, at ■ SI, 31 75 

Peas, 10J bushels, at $2, 20 50 

Pigs sold, 119, 401 75 

Potatoes, 621 bushels, at S0.90, 558 90 

Pumpkins, 9,916 pounds, at S0.03, 297 48 

Pork, 14,421 pounds, at $0.09, 1,297 89 



Amount carried forward, 



831,524 27 



26 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 

Radishes, 819 dozen, at $0.30, 
Radish, horse, \ bushel, at $1, 
Rhubarb, 2,518 pounds, at $0.02, 
Rowen, 20 tons, at $15, 
Squash, summer, 42 barrels, at $1, 
Squash, winter, 6f$fr tons, at $35, 
Straw, oat, 25 tons, at $5, 
Tallow, 137 pounds, at $0.03, 
Tomatoes, ripe, 87 A bushels, at $0.75, 
Turnips, 255% barrels, at $1.10, . 
Veal, 155 pounds, at $0.11, . 
Vinegar, 1,871 gallons, at $0.10, . 
Wood, 219 cords, at $4.50, . 



Greenhouse Products. 
Asparagus, 10 1 boxes, at $3.50, . 

Bulbs, plants, etc., 

Celery, 50 boxes, at $0.90, 

Chicken, 216 pounds, at $0.23, .... 
Cucumbers, 6 boxes, at $0.75, .... 
Dandelions, 56f bushels, at $0.50, 

Eggs, 202| dozen, at $0.30, 

Fowl, 2381 pounds, at $0.15, .... 
Lettuce, 351 boxes, at $0.50, .... 

Parsley, 1 bushel, 

Pears, 3 bushels, at $1, 

Peas, \ bushel, at $2, 

Peppers, \ bushel, at $0.75, 

Plums, 13| bushels, at $0.30, .... 
Pumpkins, 176 pounds, at $0.03, .... 
Radishes, 4 dozen bunches, at $0.30; . 
Strawberries, 151 boxes, at $0.12, 
Tomatoes, green, 27 bushels, at $0.50, 
Tomatoes, ripe, 401 bushels, at $0.75, 



$31,524 27 

245 70 
50 

50 36 
300 00 

42 00 
231 09 
125 00 
4 11 

65 67 
280 94 

17 05 
187 10 
985 50 



$34,059 29 

$36 94 
1,795 17 
45 00 
49 68 
4 50 
28 38 
60 75 
35 74 

17 61 
50 

3 00 
1 00 

38 

4 05 

5 28 
1 20 

18 12 
13 50 
30 28 



$36,210 37 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



27 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Monson State Hospital. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this 
institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1911: — 

Cash Account. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910 $458 21 

Receipts. 

Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 

Private, $7,511 37 

Reimbursements, insane, . . 3,192 60 

Cities and towns, . . . . 357 96 

$11,061 93 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 

Labor of employees, 1170 

Sales: — 

Food, $517 99 

Clothing and materials, . . 168 69 

Furnishings, .... 3 40 

Repairs and improvements, . 66 55 

Miscellaneous 18 51 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Cows and calves, . . . . 240 65 

Pigs and hogs 401 75 

Hides, 35 60 

Use of teams, .... 9 25 

Sundries 84 93 

1,547 32 

Miscellaneous receipts: — 

Interest on bank balances, . $139 95 

Sundries 38 76 

178 71 

12,799 66 

Receipts from Treasury of C on, mon wealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance of 1910 $1,639 14 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30) 11,500 00 

Approved schedules of 1911, . $177,456 19 

Less returned, .... 3 84 

177,452 35 

190,591 49 

Special appropriations 16,291 62 



Total, 



$220,140 98 



28 MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 

Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, .... $12,799 66 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1910, . . . §2,097 35 

Eleven months' schedules, 1911, . . . 177,452 35 

November advances, 8,124 88 

187,674 58 

Special appropriations: — 

Approved schedules, 16,291 62 

Balance Nov. 30, 1911: — 

In bank $1,557 66 

In office 1,817 46 

3,375 12 



Total $220,140 98 

Maintenance. 

Appropriation, $189,200 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 189,196 16 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, .... S3 84 

Analysis of Expenses. 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 

General administration, 825,074 28 

Medical service, 7,716 69 

Ward service (male), -. 17,064 84 

Ward service (female), 14,859 33 

Repairs and improvements, .... 4,537 89 

Farm, stable and grounds, .... 9,704 75 

878,957 78 

Food: — 

Butter $8,277 14 

Beans, 352 10 

Bread and crackers 420 46 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., 2,024 35 

Cheese, 83 90 

Eggs 2,779 11 

Flour 4,295 77 

Fish 2,006 77 

Fruit (dried and fresh), 1,716 68 

Meats 14,079 83 

Milk 44 00 

Molasses and syrup, 545 81 

Sugar, 3,053 53 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, .... 896 24 

Vegetables 3,850 33 

Sundries, 1,478 20 

45,904 22 

Clothing and materials: — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, .... $348 95 

Clothing, 2 r 511 43 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, . 1,473 34 

Furnishing goods, 3 74 



Amounts carried forward, 



$4,337 46 $124,862 00 



1911.1 



Amounts brought forward 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 29 

$4,337 46 S124.S62 00 



Con. 



Clothing and materials 
Hats and caps, . 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, 



69 49 
547 87 
119 57 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms, 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc. 

Furniture and upholstery, 

Kitchen furnishings, . 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc. 

Sundries, 



Heat, light and power: — 
Coal, . 

Freight on coal, . 
Oil, 

Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements: — 

Brick 

Cement, lime and plaster, 

Doors, sashes, etc., .... 

Electrical work and supplies, . 

Hardware 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 

Roofing and materials, 

Sundries, 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies, . 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Horses, .... 
Cows, .... 
Other live stock, 
Tools, farm machines, etc 
Sundries, 



Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressage and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, .... 

Gratuities, 

Hose, etc., 



$2,579 75 
487 96 
650 22 
980 98 
307 89 
950 22 
30 30 
1,032 27 



814.910 97 
341 43 
397 26 
137 74 



S172 90 
483 16 

19 80 
2.454 54 
1,141 57 
1,047 23 

51 48 
1,386 34 
3,553 77 

13 60 
527 61 



S313 17 
567 12 
912 03 

7,809 16 
131 48 
750 00 
828 50 
105 50 
378 03 
710 53 



S265 79 

1.218 17 

2.219 38 
248 75 
113 12 
205 99 



5,074 39 



7,019 59 



15,787 40 



10,852 00 



12,505 52 



Amounts carried forward, 



S4.271 20 8176,100 90 



30 



MOXSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, 



$4,271 20 $176,100 



Miscellaneous — Con. 

Ice, 

Medicines and hospital supplies, 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 

Postage, 

Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report, 
Return of runaways, .... 
Soap and laundry supplies, 
Stationery and office supplies, . 
School books and school supplies, . 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, . 

Tobacco, 

Water, 

Sundries, 



536 00 
1,405 18 
46 00 
401 36 
98 74 
144 80 
80 25 
1,244 47 
792 70 
12 11 
1,112 46 
218 50 
669 39 
1,397 87 
664 23 



13,095 26 



Total expenses for maintenance 

Special Appropriations. 



Balance Dec. 1, 1910, 
Appropriations for fiscal year, 



Total 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), 



Balance Nov. 30, 1911, 



$189,196 16 



$14,001 75 
18,000 00 

$32,001 75 
16,291 62 

$15,710 13 



Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, $3,375 12 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance 

money), 8,124 88 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth, account 

November, 1911, schedule, 243 81 



Liabilities. 



Schedule of November bills, 



$11,743 81 
$11,743 81 



Per Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 835.3452. 

Total cost for maintenance, $189,196.16. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $4.3555. 

Receipts from sales, $1,547.32. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $0.0356. 

All other institution receipts, $11,252.34. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $0.2590. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



31 



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32 MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



VALUATION. 



Land, $31,977 00 

Buildings, 575,645 41 

Water and sewerage system, . . . . . 51,521 73 

Personal property : — 

Provisions and groceries, 1,802 16 

Clothing and clothing material, 5,408 04 

Furnishings, 70,548 38 

Heat, light and power: — 

Fuel, 64 00 

All other property, 620 85 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . . 51,122 79 

All other property, 3,643 53 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Live stock on the farm, 14,361 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, 8,033 25 

Carriages and agricultural implements, .... 5,446 49 

All other property, 2,335 96 

Miscellaneous, 10,093 73 



$833,674 32 

Nurses' Training School Fund. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910, $408 97 

Twelve months' receipts, 183 06 



$592 03 

Twelve months' payments, 223 30 



Balance Nov. 30, 1911, $368 73 

Investment, 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank, $41 74 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 326 32 

Cash in office, 67 



S368 73 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 



33 



Patients' Money. 



Balance Dec. 1, 1910 S672 80 

Twelve months' receipts, 2,345 20 



S3,018 00 

Twelve months' pajnnents, 2.303 94 



Balance Dec. 1, 1911, $714 06 

Investment. 

Deposited in Palmer National Bank,. $43 51 

Deposited in Palmer Savings Bank, 592 96 

Cash in office, 77 59 



S714 06 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



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40 MOXSOX STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



4. — Residence of Persons admitted by Commitment. 





First admitted 
to Any 
Hospital. 


Other 
Admissions. 


Totals. 


PLACES. 




Females. 


J2 


H 


DC 

"3 


Females. 


■ 


H 


CO 

3 

S3 


Females. 


•A 
■ 

H 


A. — Insane: — 

Bristol County, . 
Essex County, 
Middlesex County, 
Plymouth County, 
Suffolk County, 
Worcester County, 


2 
1 
4 
1 
12 
8 


1 

5 
3 


2 
2 
4 
1 

17 
11 




- 


: 


2 
1 
4 
1 
12 
8 


1 

5 
3 


2 
2 
4 

17 
11 


Totals, .... 


28 


9 


37 


— — 






28 


9 


37 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over) , 
Country districts (under 10.0C0), . 


16 
12 


5 
4 


21 
16 




- 




16 
12 


5 
4 


21 
16 


B. — Sane: — 

Barnstable County, 
Berkshire County, 
Bristol County, . 
Essex County, 
Hampden County, 
Hampshire County, . 
Middlesex County, 
Norfolk County, 
Plymouth County, 
Suffolk County, 
Worcester County, 


8 
9 
2 
4 
2 
14 
6 
2 
19 
11 


2 
5 
11 
4 

12 
3 
2 
21 
11 


.5 
14 
13 
8 
2 
26 
9 
4 
40 
22 


1 

2 
1 
1 

2 


3 


1 

2 
1 
1 

5 


1 
4 

9 
4 
5 
3 
14 
6 
2 
21 
11 


2 
5 
11 
4 

12 
3 
2 
24 
11 


1 

6 
14 
15 
9 
3 
26 
9 
4 
45 
22 


Totals, .... 


73 


71 


144 


7 


3 


10 


80 


74 


154 


Cities or large towns (10,000 or over) , 
Country districts (under 10,000), . 


60 
13 


56 
15 


116' 
28 


5 
2 


3 


8 
2 


65 
15 


59 
15 


124 

30 



5. — Civil Condition of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 





Insane. 




Sane 




Totals. 


















00 








J 






I 






« 


GO 




Males 


Fema 


Total 


ce 
e» 

Is 


Fema 


Total 


Males 


oj 

1 


Total 


Unmarried, 


25 


9 


34 


64 


58 


122 


89 


67 


156 




3 




. 3 


9 


9 


18 


12 


9 














4 


4 




4 


2 i 










































Totals 


28 


9 


37 


73 


71 


144 


101 


80 


181 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 41 

6. — Occupations of Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



Males. 





I 


& 


CD 




6 

ej 

8 


c 


■ 
1 






% 


o 








o 
H 


Antique furniture 








Janitor, 


- 


1 


1 


restorer, 


- 


1 


1 


Laborer, . 


2 


5 


7 


Bookkeeper, 


- 


1 


1 


Meter tester, . 


- 


1 


1 


Canvasser, 




1 


1 


x amuer, 




i 
i 


1 
1 


Carpenter, 




2 


2 


Press feeder, . 




1 


1 


Chair maker, . 


_ 


1 


1 


Printer, 


1 




1 


Commercial traveler, 




1 


1 


Scholar, 




8 


8 


Factory operative, . 


1 


5 


6 


Screw worker, . 




1 


1 


Farmer, . 




2 


2 


Teamster, 




2 


2 


Fisherman, 




1 


1 


No occupation, 


23 


37 


60 


Grocer, 




1 


1 




















Hostler, . 


1 




1 


Totals, . 


28 


73 


101 



Females. 



Boxmaker, 




1 


1 


Scholar, 




8 


8 


Clerk, . . . 




1 


1 


Seamstress, 




1 


1 


Domestic, 


1 


13 


14 


No occupation, 


8 


34 


42 


Factory operative, . 




3 


3 




















Housewife, 




9 


9 


Totals, . 


9 


71 


80 


Mail correspondent, 




1 


1 









Wife or Daughter of — 



Baker, 








Grocer, 




1 


1 


Bartender, 








Hackman, 




1 


1 


Bleacher, 








Hatter, 




2 


2 


Boiler maker, . 








Laborer, . 




3 


3 


Carriage washer, 








Leather cutter, 


1 




1 


Clergyman, 








Machinist, 




2 


2 


Clerk, . . . 








Mason, 




1 


1 


Engineer, . 








Musician, 




2 


2 


Expressman, . 








Real estate, 




1 


1 


Factory operative, . 




4 


4 


Ship calker, 




1 


1 


Farmer, . 




2 


2 


Unknown, 


8 


38 


46 


Fireman, . 




2 


2 
























Gardener, 




1 


1 


Totals, . 


9 


71 


80 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 



Died. 


AT TIME OP 
DEATH. 


•SJT^OJ, 




CO ' 


CO CO 
CO 


"SGyTSHI^hT 


1 ^ Tti | CI CM 1 HU5NH I 


00 1 


oo 

-M o 




1 t)«cO | 1 CM CM -h <M 1 CM 1 


O I 


a 

CO 

t-c CM 
CO 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 


•sji^oj. 




cn 50 


CO 


"(2^ITT , TTTa .T 


1 O 1 1 1 1 1 -H-H-H | | 


CO lO 


oo -* 

-h 00 






"0 -H 


o 

<-t CO 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF INSANITY. 




1 O CO CM 1 CO CO ^ d I | 


CO 


CO oo 
<M 




I T»« CO >— 1 1 ClrtNMN 1 1 


00 1 


oo OS - 

r-l CM 

co 




IOWH |HNNH | | | 


CO I 


o « 

-H CO 

<M 


First admitted to Any Hospital. 


WHEN ADMITTED. 


•S|B^OX 


' n'*^ I-hcM-h»^^h 1 | 


CO 1 


CO «5 




I !SM 1 1 1 1 i— 1 1 | 1 | 


Oi 1 


00 
CO 


•sarejq; 


1 O <N — 1 | (MM | fHH | | 


28 1 


1« 

oo 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF EPILEPSY. 


•spjioj, 


CCSlrtHil | 1 <-< 1 1 I 1 

CM 


CO r-4 

CO 


CO 00 




-moo 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


OS | 






CMjH-H-H-l | |H| | | | 


t--H 

CM 


00 

00 

CM O 


AT FIRST ATTACK 
OF INSANITY. 


•srejoj, 


ICO^f-H | (M -H ^ | | 


CO ' 


CO >o 








00 
CO* 




1 ©IM-H 1 -HIM 1 -H^ 1 1 

CN 


00 1 

CM 


IQ 

00 

CM "0 


OS 

U 
< 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, 

From 15 to 20 years, 

20 to 25 years, j 

25 to 30 years, 

30 to 35 years, 

35 to 40 years, 

40 to 50 years, 

50 to 60 years 

60 to 70 years - 

70 to 80 years 

80 to 90 years 

Totals, . . 

Unknown, 

Total persons, 

Mean known age, 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



43 



I CO>flU3N(M>OMNN(M I 



I »H sjl I (M IH N T-l I 



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d 
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O 



so 

so 
"8. 

I- 



I 0<tH I tN ^ CO I 



I t- CO I I I ,-H<M 



■spnox 



M 

o . 

(n CO 



• • 33 ^ ■ 81 ■ 1 T- T- T- ? J 
. S £ 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 

It 0) S 3 C O "J 3 S S 'J 
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— O»»©>0000000 
-.MMMCO'tiOCNOOO 

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o2£ 



o 9 



a 

i 



44 MOXSON STATE HOSPITAL. [Dec. 

8. — Probable Causes of Epilepsy in Persons first admitted to Any Hospital. 



Predisposing Causes. 





Admitted. 


HEREDITARY 
TENDENCY. 


NEUROTIC 
TENDENCY. 


ALCOHOLIC 
TENDENCY. 


EXCITING CAUSES. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


J 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


/ TISQTIC, 

Physical: — 


























■ 

Encephalitis, 


9 


5 


14 




- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Diet indiscretion, .... 


1 


- 


1 




- 


1 














Fright 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 














Indigestion, 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 




1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 














TW-ala 


13 


5 


18 


4 


- 


4 


1 


- 






- 


1 




15 


4 


19 






















28 


9 


37 


4 


- 


4 


1 


- 


i 


1 


- 


1 


Physical: — 




























3 


5 


8 




















Cerebral hemorrhage, 


3 


2 


5 






















1 


3 


4 




















Blow on head 


2 


1 


3 




















Spinal meningitis, .... 


1 


1 


2 




















Diet indiscretion, .... 


1 




1 














1 




1 


Injury and fright, .... 




1 


1 




1 


1 














Traumatism, 


1 




1 




















Puerperal eclampsia, 




1 


1 
























1 


1 




1 


1 














Establishment of menstruation, 




1 


1 




1 


1 


















1 


1 




















Hydrocephalus, .... 


1 




1 
























1 


1 




















Pneumonia, 


1 
























Typhoid fever, 




























1 


















































Alcoholism, ..... 


1 
























Totals 


16 


20 


36 




3 


3 








1 




1 


Unknown 


57 


51 


108 


11 


8 


19 




1 




1 




1 


Totals 


73 


71 


144 


11 


11 


22 






i 


2 




2 


Aggregates, 


29 


25 


54 


4 


3 


7 


1 




i 


1 




1 


Unknown, 


72 


55 


127 


11 


8 


19 




1 




1 




1 


Aggregates 


101 


80 


181 


15 


11 


26 


1 




2 


2 




2 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



T}H CO CM 



I CO CM CO CO CM 

NHHH 



OS CM 
»0 CM 



i-H OS 



I I 



i— I CO t— I CO 00 i— I GOCO 

NWHH OOtH 



I I (NHHtOOOOCJH 

CO CO CM CM 



I | hh | MONiOH 
NHHH 



I | H | HCOOOOO^O 



00 CO 
CM i-h 



CO 00 
CO 



LO 00 CO 
CO t>- 



I I I I I iO OS lO CM 



I j i i i I CM ^ i — i i— i 



r-i CO 

CO 



CO io 
CM 



I I I 

CO 



I os I I I I I I I I 



I 00 I ! I I I I I I 
CM 



OS I 



00 I 
CM 



S 

03 
o 

>> 

.s 

a 

o 

£t= a gq m H 3 
„ O CO CO t-h CM >0 i-h CM c3 - ~ 2 

^gooooooo^ ^ ~ £ 

§ a 8 > s > 



46 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



to to <M 



CO CO CM 
<M CM CM 



CO lO 
to 



^ rH i-h 



i-h Oi OS CO 
tO to LQ 



^ <M 
CO 



GO 00 >0 



*0 I 



CO CO 

CO CO CO 



to to to 



i— I i— i i— i to I 



i O CO to 



i— I i—l i— I CO I I i— I Tt< ^tl 



•sajBinaj 



CM <M i-i 



CO CO (M I 
to 



i—l H tO 

CO CO to 



CO CO CO 



to i cm i 

CM 



(M(N CM 



CO CO to 



I 1-1 

CO CO CO 



< 3 



•sajraj^ 



•sajBuiaj 



a o 
•■ §^ 

'51 o __ 

o o 



• 02 

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02 O 

CD 02 

c3 O 

o a 

o o 



l <« 



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ra 

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02 02 

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« s 5 
o 



. • 02 

02 O 

33 02 

02 

O Oh 

O O 





o3 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 62. 47 



11. — Causes of Death. 





IXSAX 


E. 


Sane. 


! 1 


OTAI 


s. 


CAUSES. 




t 






S 






s 






GO 
71 


g 


r. 

3 


"3 


"3 
| 


X 

n 




1 


rt 

"o 






i 


o 




1 


I 




fa 


H 


Nervous system : — 




















Status epilepticus, 


- 


1 


1 


6 


1 


7 


6 


2 


8 


Epilepsy, 


8 


7 


15 


5 


2 


7 


13 


9 


22 


Epileptic convulsion, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


1 - 


3 


3 


Cerebral hemorrhage, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Respiratory system: — 




















Lobar pneumonia, 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 




i 


i 
l 


Pulmonary edema, 


1 


1 


2 


- 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, 


2 


4 


6 


1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


8 


Broncho-pneumonia, 


I 


o 


3 


o 


o 

z 


A 

4 


3 


4 


7 


Asphyxia, 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


4 


Pulmonary abscess, . 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


i 
i 




i 


Circulatory system : — 






















- 


- 




- 


2 


2 




9 


o 

Z 


Myocarditis 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 





1 


1 


Fatty degeneration of heart, 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 - 


1 


1 


Geni to-urinary system-: — 




















Acute parenchymatous nephritis, 


1 


_ 


1 




_ 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


General : — 




















Enteric fever, .... 






- 


i 
i 




i 
l 


1 


- 


1 


Carcinoma of prostate, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Cellulitis (septicemia), 








1 




1 


i 
i 




1 
1 


Accidental drowning, . 






- 


1 




1 


1 


- 


1 


Digestive system : — 




















Ptomaine poisoning, 








1 




1 


1 




1 


Acute gastroenteritis, . 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Totals, 


16 


18 


34 


21 


15 


36 


37 


33 


70 



48 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 



[Dec. 



ALL OTHER ADMISSIONS. 


Whole Known 
Period 
of Hospital 
Residence. 


•ei^ox 


1 111 1 1 1 1 C4 


CO 1 


CO CO 

cs 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CM t1 


CO 1 


CO CO 

at 




Ill 


1 1 


1 1 


Whole Known Period 
of Disease. 


epilepsy. 


•srtr>ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 i-l CM 


CO 1 


« g 

CM 


•soreuia^ 


1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 ~* «M 


CO 1 


« g 

CM 




i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 


insanity. 


•srB*ox 


t 1 1 1 1 • 1 1 *h e« 1 


CO 1 


CO o 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i-l CM 1 


CO 1 


CO o 
CM 


■saji3j\[ 




1 1 


1 1 


FIRST ADMITTED TO ANY HOSPITAL. 


Whole Duration of Attack. 


epilepsy. 


sjtnox 




CO 1 


OS 

CO • 
CM 




1 1 1 1 1 1 i— I CM lO 


tO 1 


tO Tt4 
i-l t>- 

CM 




1 1 1 1 1 1 i-4 -c(4 to CO 




16 

220.12 


insanity. 


•s^ox 


1 -H | | 1 CO -h CO O i-l 


5 1 


31 

96.02 




1 1 1 1 1 CO -c(4 CO tO 1 


tO 1 


15 

92.80 




1 1 1 1 1 CO -H 


CO 1 


16 
99.03 


Hospital 
Residence. 


si^ox 


1 — H I | I CO >-l 00 i-l 


CO ' 


31 

93.09 


•sajBuia^ 


1 1 1 1 1 CO ^4 ^4 ^4 | 


tO 1 


o 

to oo 

CO 

OO 




1 i—l 1 1 1 1 I s - CO TJ4 i-C 


CO 1 


16 

99 . 03 


Duration before Admission. 


epilepsy. 


•si^ox 






31 
161.16 


•sajBuiaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CM CO t~- CO 


tO 1 


15 
195.60 




1 1 1 1 1 i-H CM CO O i—i 


CO 1 


16 
130.12 


INSANITY. 


"SIT310X 


' CO ' ' ' ' ' ' 


S ' 


-H tO 

CO 


•sarBtna^ 


I >o 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


tO 1 


to »o 


sa^K 


1 CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


CO I 


CO to 


PERIOD. 


Congenital, .... 

Under 1 month, . 

From 1 to 3 months, 
3 to 6 months, 
6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, 

2 to 5 years, 
5 to 10 years, 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, 

Totals, .... 
Unknown, .... 

Totals, .... 

Average of known cases (in 
months). 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 62. 



49 



<M I I CO 



i-H i-l CM 



I I I I I I I I I 



I I 




2 2 2 



o 

$ 8 



is J 
2 o 
5 H 



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